Tag: accident

RHOD ‘s Brandi Redmond Says 9-Year-Old Daughter Survived Car Accident That Killed Her Mother-in-Law

Brandi Redmond is asking fans to keep her family in their prayers.

On Saturday, Oct. 10, The Real Housewives of Dallas star took to Instagram and shared that her mother-in-law, Jill Marie Redmond, died in a car accident. She also noted that her 9-year-old daughter Brinkley, who was in the vehicle at the time of the incident, survived.

“My husband’s beautiful mom has gone on to be with our Savior and my sister in laws said it best…so I PLEASE ask that you keep my family in your prayers during this difficult time,” she wrote, “and I ask that you lift my sweet Brinkley up as she continues to heal and that God protects her heart and eyes from this tragedy. I am so thankful for her life. This is probably the most thankful yet pain I’ve ever felt.”

The Bravolebrity did not share any further details regarding the accident or if the child suffered any specific injuries.

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In addition to publishing her own note, Brandi reposted a message from her sister-in-laws Lauren Cranford, Megan Hughey and Kristen Kosch.

“This is our mom, Jill Marie Redmond,” the post, which featured a series of photographs, read. “We spoke to her daily. To speak of her in past tense hurts beyond words. Hours ago we lost her in a tragic car accident. Thank you, Jesus, for saving our niece who was in the car with her.”

The women then went on to describe their mother. “To know our mom was to love her,” they continued. “She was a shining light to all who were lucky enough to know her. She loved so fiercely. She felt so deeply. And she loved Jesus with all her heart. Her world was FAMILY. She loved her 4 children and many grand babies to the depths of her soul, and she left us doing what she loved most- caring for her grand babies. We are in shock and are experiencing an indescribable pain.”

Cranford, Hughey and Kosch, who host the podcast Girl, I Slept in My Makeup, then informed their followers they were going to pause their show and thanked them for their support.

“In our mom’s honor, if you have a living parent please tell them how much you love and appreciate them, and hug your loved ones extra tight tonight and always,” they concluded. “We love you. Shine bright and spread love and kindness.”

News of the accident came a week after Brinkley celebrated her ninth birthday. Brandi—who is also the mother to Brooklyn, 11, and Bruin, 2—marked the milestone with a heartfelt message. “Happy 9th Birthday @brinkley__redmond,” Brandi wrote at the time. “You are my sunshine. I love you so so so much and can’t believe 9 years have already gone by. Thank you for your sweet gentle soul that loves life to the fullest. You are EVERYTHING and I am so blessed to call you my daughter.

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This government’s incompetence is no accident. It’s inevitable

The serial incompetence of Boris Johnson’s government is not an accident. It may look like haplessness, but that is to mistake the symptom for the cause. Instead this government’s ineptitude is a function of both the character of the man at the top and the defining creed of his administration.



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Neil Hall/EPA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Neil Hall/EPA

Reminders of our rulers’ clumsiness arrive with such regularity that it’s easy to become inured. This week we had the prime minister “misspeak” as he botched an attempt to explain the new regulations imposed by the government he leads. Perhaps that’s an easy mistake to make, considering the ever-shifting nature of the advice, best captured by that short video of Matt Lucas channelling the PM as he tells Britons, “Go to work, don’t go to work. Go outside, don’t go outside.”

But it hardly excuses the repeating pattern of errors that has blighted the government’s response to coronavirus from the start. You’ll recall the contact-tracing app that Matt Hancock hailed as a crucial weapon in the fight against the pandemic. It was scrapped in June after trials found it didn’t work, and relaunched last week – only for it to be exposed as carrying a pretty major bug. It turned out that users of the NHS Covid-19 app who had been tested in NHS hospitals couldn’t enter their results. An app with NHS branding all over it would only accept results done outside the NHS, by private, outsourced companies. That problem has been partially fixed now, but it was par for what has been a very bumpy course.

From those critical seven days that were wasted before a clearly inevitable national lockdown was imposed in March – a delay that Prof Neil Ferguson, then on the Sage committee, estimates to have cost 20,000 lives – to the multimillion-pound contracts handed to pals to supply PPE that turned out to be useless against Covid, Johnson and his team have blundered at every turn. The result is that the UK has managed to score a rare double: notching up the highest death toll in Europe along with the severest economic slump in the world.

But this is not just bad luck, an unfortunate coincidence that saw a global health crisis collide with a set of ministers sadly unsuited to the task. Governments don’t just happen to be incapable – or capable, for that matter. On the contrary, if you want competence, competence has to be prized. Take the last Labour government, particularly in its first term. Determined to rid the party of its historic association with economic failure, culminating in the IMF bailout and the “winter of discontent”, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown prized efficiency – sometimes to a fault – promoting the quiet and technocratic over the loud and inspiring. Brown apart, its longest-serving cabinet minister was Alistair Darling, never happier than when making no news. The mantra of the age was “what works”.



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: ‘Even Boris Johnson’s admirers don’t pretend that he’s a details man, across policy and process.’


© Photograph: Neil Hall/EPA
‘Even Boris Johnson’s admirers

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This government’s incompetence is no accident. It’s inevitable | Jonathan Freedland | Opinion

The serial incompetence of Boris Johnson’s government is not an accident. It may look like haplessness, but that is to mistake the symptom for the cause. Instead this government’s ineptitude is a function of both the character of the man at the top and the defining creed of his administration.

Reminders of our rulers’ clumsiness arrive with such regularity that it’s easy to become inured. This week we had the prime minister “misspeak” as he botched an attempt to explain the new regulations imposed by the government he leads. Perhaps that’s an easy mistake to make, considering the ever-shifting nature of the advice, best captured by that short video of Matt Lucas channelling the PM as he tells Britons, “Go to work, don’t go to work. Go outside, don’t go outside.”

But it hardly excuses the repeating pattern of errors that has blighted the government’s response to coronavirus from the start. You’ll recall the contact-tracing app that Matt Hancock hailed as a crucial weapon in the fight against the pandemic. It was scrapped in June after trials found it didn’t work, and relaunched last week – only for it to be exposed as carrying a pretty major bug. It turned out that users of the NHS Covid-19 app who had been tested in NHS hospitals couldn’t enter their results. An app with NHS branding all over it would only accept results done outside the NHS, by private, outsourced companies. That problem has been partially fixed now, but it was par for what has been a very bumpy course.

From those critical seven days that were wasted before a clearly inevitable national lockdown was imposed in March – a delay that Prof Neil Ferguson, then on the Sage committee, estimates to have cost 20,000 lives – to the multimillion-pound contracts handed to pals to supply PPE that turned out to be useless against Covid, Johnson and his team have blundered at every turn. The result is that the UK has managed to score a rare double: notching up the highest death toll in Europe along with the severest economic slump in the world.

But this is not just bad luck, an unfortunate coincidence that saw a global health crisis collide with a set of ministers sadly unsuited to the task. Governments don’t just happen to be incapable – or capable, for that matter. On the contrary, if you want competence, competence has to be prized. Take the last Labour government, particularly in its first term. Determined to rid the party of its historic association with economic failure, culminating in the IMF bailout and the “winter of discontent”, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown prized efficiency – sometimes to a fault – promoting the quiet and technocratic over the loud and inspiring. Brown apart, its longest-serving cabinet minister was Alistair Darling, never happier than when making no news. The mantra of the age was “what works”.

Johnson’s administration places no such premium on good governance. Why might that be? First, look

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