Tag: bar

Rodgers Bar Society hearing concludes

GUYSBOROUGH – “Anyone that knows me, I think, would be proud of how I defended myself,” Adam Rodgers told The Journal about a recent hearing of the Nova Scotia Barristers Society (NSBS). The hearing involved allegations of professional misconduct made against Rodgers related to activities at the Boudrot Rodgers Law firm in 2018.

In October of 2018, Jason Boudrot, managing partner of the Port Hawkesbury law firm Boudrot Rodgers, contacted the NSBS to report that he had “some issues with his trust accounts,” as stated in a NSBS hearing committee document in September 2019. That statement unlocked an avalanche of information and a settlement agreement between NSBS and Boudrot that saw the lawyer disbarred in 2019.

On August 18, 2020 the NSBS announced it would, “hold a hearing, at a date and time to be determined, respecting charges against Adam Rodgers, a member of the Society.” The hearing was held on October 5 and 6 in Port Hawkesbury with no witnesses called other than Rodgers; all other evidence – documents and transcripts of statements – were provided by the Society’s investigator.

Inquiries made by the Guysborough Journal to the NSBS about the hearing received the following response from Tilly Pillay QC, NSBS Executive Director, on behalf of the Society: “Adam Rodgers was aware that false time entries of his were entered to create inflated Work in Progress Reports to be filed with a lender on a quarterly basis for purposes of supporting credit extended to the firm, and failed to stop this practice. Adam Rodgers was aware of the firm’s practice of posting unsupported disbursements on client files for the purpose of supporting the extension of credit by financial institutions and failed to stop this practice.

“The evidence supporting this charge comes from interviews with employees and associates of the former law firm and from Client Ledgers generated from the firm’s accounting system that the Society reviewed as part of one or more Lawyers’ Fund for Client Compensation claims, as well as other information we received in the course of our investigation,” wrote Pillay.

When asked if it is alleged that Rodgers had knowledge that money was being moved in and out of trust funds without the client’s knowledge, Pillay responded, “Yes, it is alleged that Mr. Rodgers had knowledge of this practice.”

For his part Rodgers denies any wrongdoing. Addressing the assertion made above by the NSBS he stated, “I addressed this allegation at the hearing, and described it then as a red herring in all this. The data entries that the Society was questioning were done for a legitimate purpose, which was to estimate the total work in progress for the firm. They were not for billing clients and have no relation to the money taken by Mr. Boudrot.

“He (Boudrot) was the managing partner and everything he did was designed not to be detected. And the evidence at the hearing showed the fact that Mr. Boudrot had been stringing our accountants along for at least 10 months

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Law School Grad Goes Into Labor During Bar Exam, Finishes Test

A recent law school grad who was taking the bar exam in order to become a lawyer was complicated by the fact that her water broke mid-exam. She completed the test afterward. 

Brianna Hill, who just completed law school at Chicago’s Loyola University, took her bar exam last Monday, which lined up with her 38th week of pregnancy. Like a lot of things this year the timing had been junked up by the pandemic, which ended up pushing her exam date back to Oct. 5. As one might expect, that switch of dates proved pretty stressful.

“I thought I would only be 28 weeks pregnant when I took the bar,” Hill said to CNN. “However, due to the pandemic, the test was pushed to October and I was going to be 38 weeks. I joked about taking the test from my hospital bed. Lesson learned!”

Reports state that Hill had discovered her water broke after wrapping up the first part of a four-part test. That test was spread out over two days, and was conducted remotely with a proctor to prevent cheating. One (and by that I mean me) wonders what this proctor was doing throughout all this. 

“I thought I felt something about 30 minutes into the test and actually thought, ‘I really hope my water didn’t just break,'” Hill added. “But I couldn’t go check and so I finished the first section. As soon as I stood up when I finished, I knew my water had broken.”

For those doing the math in their heads, the test split was set to be evenly distributed for each day, meaning that there was still a second section to be completed despite what was going on in said womb at said time. Hill reportedly completed Day 1’s second section (which was said to be an hour-and-a-half long) and then went to the hospital with her husband and midwife. She adds that she took the second part after her midwife told her she had time to do it. 

Five hours afterward she had her kid, and then (on Tuesday) completed the second day of the bar exam from her hospital bed. 

“The whole time my husband and I were talking about how we wanted me to finish the test and my midwife and nurses were so on board. There just wasn’t another option in my mind,” Hill said.

CNN adds that Hill is not yet aware of her test results, but that she has a job lined up.

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Trump rape accuser seeks to bar U.S. government from her defamation lawsuit

By Jonathan Stempel

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes slandering women they sexually assaulted,” the lawyers wrote.

The Justice Department and a lawyer for Trump did not immediately respond on Tuesday to requests for comment. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan oversees the case.

Last month, the department said Trump acted “within the scope of his office as president” when speaking with the press about Carroll, and was shielded from her lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

But in Monday’s filing, Carroll’s lawyers Roberta Kaplan and Joshua Matz said that law generally covered lower-level government employees, often in federal agencies, but not the president.

The lawyers also noted that since taking office, Trump has sometimes claimed his business dealings and Twitter activity were “personal” matters. They said this made it incongruous for his comments about Carroll to be “presidential” in nature.

“Only in a world gone mad could it somehow be presidential, not personal, for Trump to slander a woman who he sexually assaulted,” they wrote.

Several women have accused Trump of sexual misconduct occurring before he took office. He has denied their claims.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by David Gregorio)

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Trump Rape Accuser Seeks to Bar U.S. Government From Her Defamation Lawsuit | Top News

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes slandering women they sexually assaulted,” the lawyers wrote.

The Justice Department and a lawyer for Trump did not immediately respond on Tuesday to requests for comment. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan oversees the case.

Last month, the department said Trump acted “within the scope of his office as president” when speaking with the press about Carroll, and was shielded from her lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

But in Monday’s filing, Carroll’s lawyers Roberta Kaplan and Joshua Matz said that law generally covered lower-level government employees, often in federal agencies, but not the president.

The lawyers also noted that since taking office, Trump has sometimes claimed his business dealings and Twitter activity were “personal” matters. They said this made it incongruous for his comments about Carroll to be “presidential” in nature.

“Only in a world gone mad could it somehow be presidential, not personal, for Trump to slander a woman who he sexually assaulted,” they wrote.

Several women have accused Trump of sexual misconduct occurring before he took office. He has denied their claims.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by David Gregorio)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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October bar exam saw some technical glitches from ExamSoft

  • An estimated 40,000 rising lawyers started a multiday bar exam today, which is being administered remotely for most of them after months of delay because of the pandemic.
  • Some examinees complained of glitches, lags, and other technical issues on the test, which is being run by ExamSoft, a Texas test-taking software company.
  • Others complained about long hold times for technical troubleshooting or said they were told to give up and take the exam in February.
  • The testing company claimed that 97% of users were able to start the first session by early Monday afternoon, and 98% of users were able to get logged in to their sessions by 2:45 p.m. Eastern.
  • If you’d like to share your experience with the bar exam and diploma privilege, please reach out to us at [email protected] and [email protected]
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After months of uncertainty and upheaval amid the coronavirus, law graduates in several major jurisdictions, including New York, California, and DC, finally sat in front of their computer screens today for the first day of remote bar exams. The “#barpocalypse” — as some test-takers called it on Twitter — has arrived. 

An estimated 40,000 rising lawyers started a multiday bar exam today, which is being administered remotely for most of them after months of delay because of the pandemic. While some jurisdictions have created ways for law graduates to practice without taking the exam, major states like New York have rejected calls for “diploma privilege” and said the bar exam is necessary.

Examinees aren’t the only ones who are under pressure. ExamSoft, the remote test-taking and proctoring software that’s being used by many states, is in the hot seat after months of intense scrutiny for cybersecurity and facial recognition concerns.

Although day one of the exam appears to have gone well enough for many test-takers, who had the opportunity to download and submit mock exams in September, others encountered issues — from minor glitches to nightmarish problems that may potentially force them to sit for the bar in February.

Read more: New York’s bar exam is cancelled. Here’s why calls are mounting for the test to be canned completely.

Some users reported on social media toward the beginning of the testing period that they were having issues loading pages that included the passwords that they would need to start their tests, but several of them said they were able to access pages containing the same information that had been set up as a fallback. An ExamSoft representative said issues with password pages were resolved by 1 p.m. Eastern time.

Bar-takers used Examplify, ExamSoft’s testing software, and needed to connect to the internet to upload their answers, and they were remotely monitored using screen-recording software and the cameras and microphones on their laptops. Many had downloaded the exam files ahead of time, but they were not able to access them until today.

Several examinees complained of issues like small or blurry text. Tanisha Henson, a Widener University Commonwealth Law School

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New law to bar domestic abusers from victims’ homes

domestic abuse gvImage copyright
Laura Dodsworth

Domestic abusers could be barred from the homes of their victims under a law proposed by the Scottish government.

The new legislation would give police and courts the power to remove suspected abusers from homes and ban them from re-entering for two months.

It would also allow landlords to end the tenancy of anyone who has been abusive to their partner.

Dr Marsha Scott from Scottish Women’s Aid said this would mean victims would not face homelessness to escape abuse.

There have been concerns that the Covid-19 lockdown has left many victims shut in with their abusers, with little chance to leave for work or to see other people.

MSPs have already passed legislation this term aimed at combating controlling behaviour, which led to the number of charges for domestic abuse crimes hitting a four-year high in September.

  • New domestic abuse law comes into force

The government has now introduced new proposals aimed at protecting victims and allowing them to remain in the family home.

The bill would allow courts to impose Domestic Abuse Protection Orders, which can bar an abuser from entering the home of their victim for up to two months.

It would also create shorter-term Domestic Abuse Protection Notices, which senior police officers could use in the same way to offer immediate protection to victims.

And it would create a new power for social landlords to end the tenancy of a perpetrator of domestic abuse and transfer their lease to the victim, should they wish to remain in the property.

‘Place of safety’

Justice Secretary Humza Yousaf said the coronavirus pandemic had “highlighted the importance of protecting women and girls who find themselves isolated and vulnerable due to the actions of an abusive partner”.

He added: “This new bill will apply to all those at risk of domestic abuse, but we know women are disproportionally affected, representing 80% of victims.

“A person’s home should be a place of safety and the new orders being introduced will give victims of domestic abuse space and time to address their longer term safety and housing situation.”

Dr Scott said the bill was “a milestone moment for women, children and young people experiencing domestic abuse, who for years have asked us why it should be them rather than their abusers, who have to leave their homes, pets and belongings to seek safety”.

She said: “Domestic abuse is the leading cause of women’s homelessness in Scotland, with women often facing the impossible choice between living with an abuser and making themselves and their children homeless.

“We have long said that emergency protective orders will make an immediate and significant difference for those women and children, offering them respite and breathing space as they seek support and safety.”

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