Tag: Bombing

Ben Sasse: Democrats nixing filibuster ‘suicide bombing’ of government

  • Sen. Ben Sasse slammed Joe Biden and Senate Democrats for declining to state their position on expanding the Supreme Court and called out the party for considering an elimination of the filibuster, according to The Hill.
  • “What they’re really talking about — or refusing to talk about — is the suicide bombing of two branches of government,” Sasse said.
  • Joe Biden has stated that he’ll express his position on adding seats to the Supreme Court after the election.
  • Amid questions about how Judge Amy Coney Barrett would rule in major cases, Sasse defended her, saying that she was “very clear about her jurisprudence” as “an originalist and a textualist.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sen. Ben Sasse on Sunday harshly criticized Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for declining to state his position on expanding the Supreme Court and called out Senate Democrats for considering an elimination of the filibuster if they were to win a majority in November, according to The Hill.

Speaking to Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday,” the first-term GOP senator said that any attempts to eliminate the 60-vote rule to advance legislation and add seats to the Supreme Court would amount to a “suicide bombing” of government. When asked about his position on “court packing,” Biden has consistently said that he didn’t want his decision to be a headline and would state his position after the November election.

“It’s grotesque that Vice President Biden won’t answer that really basic question,” Sasse said. “And it isn’t just one branch of government. What they’re really talking about — or refusing to talk about — is the suicide bombing of two branches of government.”

He added: “What they’re talking about is blowing up the deliberative structure of the United States Senate by abolishing the filibuster and making it possible to turn the Senate into just another House of Representatives where every two years, by a 51-49 or 49-51 majority, major portions of American life change. And they’re talking about doing that to pack the Supreme Court.”

 

Hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s nominee to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, are set to begin this week amid outcry from Democrats over her ideology and the accelerated timeline of the confirmation process.

Sasse expressed his support for Barrett in the interview, saying that she was “very clear about her jurisprudence, she’s an originalist and a textualist.”

Amid heavy speculation on how she would rule in cases threatening the Affordable Care Act or abortion, Sasse added that judges “don’t advocate for policy positions” and that “we shouldn’t have either Democrats or Republicans on the committee trying to figure out how can they divine the future of how they’re going to rule on particular cases.”

If Barrett were to be confirmed to the Supreme Court, it would cement a 6-3 conservative majority on the bench. Biden has firmly maintained his stance that the winner of the November election should make the judicial nomination.

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Court Packing Is ‘Suicide Bombing of Two Branches of Government’

Senator Ben Sasse (R., Neb.) on Sunday called Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s refusal to say whether he would add seats to the Supreme Court if elected “grotesque,” saying court packing amounts to the “suicide bombing of two branches of government.”

“It’s grotesque that Vice President Biden won’t answer that really basic question,” Sasse said in an appearance on Fox News Sunday. “And it isn’t just one branch of government, what they’re really talking about or refusing to talk about, is the suicide bombing of two branches of government.”

He continued:

What they’re talking about is blowing up the deliberative structure of the United States Senate by abolishing the filibuster and making it possible to turn the Senate into just another House of Representatives where every two years by a 51-49 or 49-51 majority major portions of American life change. And they’re going about doing that to pack the Supreme Court.

Sasse’s comments come as a bitter political battle is set to play out in confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett beginning on Monday. Republicans have quickly moved to confirm Barrett ahead of the November 3 election, and in response many on the left have called on Democrats to add additional seats to the nine-seat Supreme Court in retaliation.

When asked on Friday whether voters “deserve to know” if he would pack the court, Biden responded, “No, they don’t.”

Sasse also called the efforts of Senator Chris Coons (D., Del.) to excuse Biden’s evasion of the court packing question “Orwellian.”

“For the last four years I’ve seen unprecedented court packing where nominees to fill lifetime seats in the federal judiciary who the American Bar Association said were not qualified got jammed through,” Coons said on Fox News Sunday, moments before Sasse’s appearance, seemingly changing the definition of court packing in order to avoid the question.

Coons said that Republicans’ push to confirm Barrett “constitutes court packing” and called her views “not just extreme,” but “disqualifying.”

Sasse denounced the politicization of the courts, accusing the left of wanting to turn the Supreme Court into “a super legislature to advance things they can’t get done through the electorate.”

“That is not what textualists want,” he said. 

He called Barrett a “rock star” who is “very clear about her jurisprudence.”

“She’s an originalist and she is a textualist, which means when she puts on her black robe in the morning, she knows what it is to be a judge, and that is to cloak your personal preferences,” he said. “Our judges don’t wear red or blue jerseys, they don’t advocate for policy positions and we shouldn’t be having either Democrats or Republicans on the committee trying to figure out how can they divine the future of how they’ll rule on particular cases.”

When Wallace asked if Sasse, who is pro-life, is counting on Barrett to either end or restrict Roe v. Wade , the Nebraska senator said that while it is his job to tout specific

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Sasse accuses Democrats of ‘suicide bombing of two branches of government’

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSunday shows preview: Trump, top Republicans recover from COVID-19; stimulus bill remains in limbo GOP vows quick confirmation of Trump’s Supreme Court pick amid coronavirus turmoil McConnell: Plan is to confirm Trump’s Supreme Court pick before election MORE (R-Neb.) said on Sunday that Democrats expanding the Supreme Court and ending the filibuster would be “suicide bombing” and called Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district Nebraska district could prove pivotal for Biden in November Bringing Black men back home MORE’s refusal to clarify whether he would expand the court “grotesque.”

“It’s grotesque that Vice President Biden won’t answer that very basic question,” Sasse, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said on “Fox News Sunday.”

The Nebraska Republican said an expansion of the court, combined with the elimination of the filibuster, would constitute a “suicide bombing” that would “blow up” their respective branches of government and “turn the Senate into just another House of Representatives.”

Sasse also defended Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE’s Supreme Court nominee, amid warnings that she would overturn Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act, saying she was “very clear about her jurisprudence, she’s an originalist and a textualist.”

Judges, Sasse claimed, “don’t advocate for policy positions … we shouldn’t have either Democrats or Republicans on the committee trying to figure out how can they divine the future of how they’re going to rule on particular cases.”

Host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceBob Dole claims no Republicans on debate commission support Trump Debate commission co-chair: ‘No evidence whatsoever’ Trump has tested negative Trump calls into Rush Limbaugh’s show for two hours MORE pushed back, saying Sasse, who is himself staunchly anti-abortion, was “being a little disingenuous here.”

“Aren’t you in fact counting on Justice Barrett to either end or restrict Roe v. Wade, and wouldn’t you be terribly disappointed if she failed to do that?” Wallace asked.

Sasse again denied that judicial originalists held policy positions, saying: “If Amy Barrett were running for the United States Senate from the state of Illinois, she would have policy positions that she would lay out to the American people, [but] that isn’t what a judge’s job is.”

As to the president saying he would appoint a Supreme Court justice who would rule in his favor on issues like the ACA and Roe v. Wade, Sasse replied: “President Trump says a whole bunch of things, so he may say something that’s more outcomes-based.”

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Alabama’s governor apologizes to Sarah Collins Rudolph, a survivor of the 1963 Birmingham church bombing, and says government ready to discuss reparations

After lawyers requested an apology and financial reparations for a survivor of the 1963 Birmingham church bombing, Alabama’s governor has somewhat obliged: offering a formal apology, while proposing further discussions as the woman seeks restitution.



a man and a woman sitting on a couch: Sarah Collins Rudolph sits with her husband, George Rudolph. Earlier this month, Collins Rudolph's legal team requested a formal apology and restitution for the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.


© Jay Reeves/AP
Sarah Collins Rudolph sits with her husband, George Rudolph. Earlier this month, Collins Rudolph’s legal team requested a formal apology and restitution for the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Sarah Collins Rudolph’s lawyers pressed Gov. Kay Ivey earlier this month to offer her a formal apology and restitution for the losses Collins Rudolph suffered as a result of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, including the loss of her sister and her vision in one eye.

Wednesday, Ivey responded, calling the bombing on September 15, 1963, “one of the darkest days in Alabama’s history.”

“Thankfully, the violence that unfolded on that fateful Sunday morning — and other incidents during this difficult chapter of American history — resulted in many positive changes that have been beneficial to our national story during the years and decades that followed,” Ivey wrote, going on to condemn the “racist, segregationist” rhetoric used by some state leaders at the time.

She continued, formally apologizing for the incident: “Moreover, there should be no question that Ms. Collins Rudolph and the families of those who perished — including Ms. Collins Rudolph’s sister, Addie Mae, as well as Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson, and Carole Denise McNair — suffered an egregious injustice that has yielded pain and suffering over the ensuing decades. For that, they most certainly deserve a sincere, heartfelt apology — an apology that I extend today without hesitation or reservation.”

Ivey did not address the request for restitution directly, but proposed that attorneys for the governor’s office and the state legislature start discussions with Collins Rudolph’s lawyers as soon as possible. Ivey said she would instruct her general counsel to reach out “to continue this very important dialogue.”

In a follow-up statement, the legal team for Collins Rudolph said they were “gratified” by the governor’s acknowledgment of the injustice as well as her apology, and they “look forward to engaging in discussions in the near future with the Governor about compensation, which Ms. Collins Rudolph justly deserves after the loss of her beloved sister and for the pain, suffering and lifetime of missed opportunities resulting from the bombing.”

Collins Rudolph has yet to receive financial help, she has said

On September 15, 1963, members of the Ku Klux Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four Black girls between the ages of 11 and 14.

Though the attack was a major catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement — a year later, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act — Collins Rudolph claimed she was never offered payment, medical care or an official apology.

“Given recent events,” her lawyers wrote in the initial letter to Ivey on September 14, “now is the time for Ms. Collins Rudolph to receive long overdue justice.”

Collins Rudolph

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White Supremacist Group Linked To Mosque Bombing Planned Violent Revolution Against Government

An Illinois-based white supremacist group linked to a mosque attack and an attempted abortion clinic bombing had stockpiled guns and explosives to wage a revolution against the federal government, according to reports.

Michael Hari, the suspected leader of the White Rabbit Militia group, is due to go on trial in connection to the bombing of the Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, Minnesota. No one was killed or injured during the attack, which took place just before morning prayers on August 5, 2017.

According to court documents, the group carried out the attack on the mosque “because Hari and his men hated Islam and wanted Muslims out of the United States.”

Hari is also accused of the attempted bombing of the Women’s Health Practice abortion clinic in Champaign, Illinois, on November 7, 2017. Two other men—Joe Morris and Michael McWhorter—have already pleaded guilty for their role in the attack, in which a pipe bomb was thrown through the clinic’s window but failed to detonate.

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The new court documents show how the “paramilitary terrorist organization” stockpiled weapons and equipment including devices to jam cell phone signals to wage a war against those they did not like.

The photos also show badges the far-right militia group wore, including one reading “ain’t no fun when the rabbit got the gun” and another in which they refer to themselves as “pork eating crusaders.”

Court documents showed Morris and McWhorter had robbed a Walmart store in Watseka, Illinois, in December 2017 because they believed that Walmart funded antifa. The pair, along with Hari, are accused of attempting to rob a Walmart store in Mount Vernon, Illinois, that month for the same reason.

The three are also accused of planting an incendiary device to vandalize a segment of railroad track used by the Canadian National Railway. Hari is then alleged to have called Canadian National Railway to demand they send digital currency or they would carry out more attacks.

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Following his arrest in connection to the Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center attack, McWhorter allegedly told an FBI agent that the group wanted to let Muslims know they are not welcome in the U.S. and to “scare them out of the country.”

Hari is accused of conspiring to commit federal crimes using explosives and possessing an unregistered explosive device. He also faces charges relating to targeting a religious property and trying to obstruct the free exercise of religious beliefs.

He is due to stand trial in November. His date had been postponed from July due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

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(File photo) A man carries a knife and a handgun as several hundred members of the Proud Boys and other similar groups gathered for a rally at Delta Park in Portland, Oregon on September 26, 2020. The Illinois-based White Rabbit Militia are accused of stockpiling weapons to preparing for a revolution against the federal government.
Maranie R. STAAB / AFP/Getty

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