Tag: Brunswick

Brunswick Area Historical Society fundraiser is anything but ‘old school’

BRUNSWICK, Ohio — As the summer harvest began to wane at the Brunswick Farmers Market, some new ideas cropped up to help the nonprofit Brunswick Area Historical Society in its efforts to raise funds for its nearly completed “old school” building.

With large-crowd fundraisers stymied by COVID-19, and even many of the usual summer activities curtailed this year, fundraising was painfully slow.

That’s when a new vendor at the markets this year, Stacey Asvestas, stepped in to see if she could help.

Once she heard that the historical society needed to raise money for the building that will house 200 years of Brunswick school artifacts, she jumped into action.

Actually, she skated into action.

Asvestas roller-skated around Heritage Farm from her vendor’s spot this summer, so she skated to each of the vendors at the market and asked if they would contribute to an auction. Because the market season was almost over, she suggested an online auction.

Then, she worked with Ken Chamers, the historical society’s internet guru, to start the auction of items donated by the many vendors and other members of the community.

The first one-week auction started on Monday, Oct. 5 — the day following the last farmers market. The hope is to take the auctions through to the Christmas shopping season — and maybe beyond, she said.

Although Asvestas is new to the farmers market, she is no stranger to the area; she grew up in Valley City and is a Buckeye High School graduate. She is the mother of three and has two grandchildren.

While her children were young, she bought and sold classic cars. She also worked part-time at Miss Molly’s Tea Room in Medina for 15 years. She then formed a 501c(3) nonprofit organization.

“It’s a musical ministry — helping at-risk young people gain self-esteem through performance,” she said.

Her group, Stage 1 Music Campus, has provided entertainment for a number of area events, with Asvestas getting rave reviews for her enthusiasm and organizational prowess.

She has lived in Brunswick for eight years and, as a person with lots of allergies, she discovered and sells ZA Charcoal Slurry detox for people and animals, and also has crafts and other items. She can be reached at Stage1star@gmail.com.

As items are donated for the online auctions, she packages them, photographs them and sends descriptions to Chamers, who lists them on the charity auction site. He set up the bidding process, and there is a way either to pay online or when the items are picked up. Once someone wins, they can arrange to pick up their items at the farm.

Chamers has been a Brunswick resident for 20 years, having grown up in Parma Heights. He is a graduate of Parma High School and, while in college, he worked at a computer store at the beginning of the home computing era.

“I was really interested and started programming,” he said, “and I soon got a programming job and just kept going.”

Currently, he works for

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New Brunswick Medical Society warns of health-care gaps after Clinic 554 closes

New Brunswick’s only clinic offering abortions outside of hospitals and family care practice Clinic 554 has closed its doors to most of its patients. The New Brunswick Medical Society now says this loss will create a gap in health-care services.



a sign on the side of a building: Clinic 554 in Fredericton, N.B., is shown on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. The only medical clinic offering abortions in New Brunswick announced its impending closure last week, blaming a provincial policy that refuses to fund surgical abortions outside a hospital. Advocates say rural Canadians across the country face barriers accessing abortions but a small number of clinics and strained healthcare systems make the issue especially pronounced in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett


© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett
Clinic 554 in Fredericton, N.B., is shown on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. The only medical clinic offering abortions in New Brunswick announced its impending closure last week, blaming a provincial policy that refuses to fund surgical abortions outside a hospital. Advocates say rural Canadians across the country face barriers accessing abortions but a small number of clinics and strained healthcare systems make the issue especially pronounced in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett

The clinic ended most care on Sept. 30, but some publicly-funded services are still offered to a few vulnerable patients with complex care.

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“I am still seeing some people,” said Clinic 554 owner Dr. Adrian Edgar.

While he hopes to expand his practice again, Edgar says New Brunswick’s new Health Minister Dorothy Shephard has yet to return his calls.

Re-opening “would save the health-care system time, space, money,” Edgar told Global News on Saturday.

Read more: Security removes tents from protesters during vigil for Clinic 554 at N.B. legislature

With the closure of Clinic 554, New Brunswickers lost more than just an abortion clinic.

“The province of New Brunswick has well over 35,000 orphan patients right now who are looking for family doctors and certainly the closure of Clinic 554 is going to add to that list,” Dr. said Chris Goodyear, the new N.B. Medical Society president.

The practice also provided transgender health care and prided itself in being LGBTQ2I+ friendly.

But it constantly faced financial ruin due to lack of funding from the provincial government.

In New Brunswick, abortions are only offered in three locations: two hospitals in Moncton and one hospital in Bathurst, as previous N.B. governments have not repealed a regulation banning the funding of abortions outside of hospitals.

Higgs has also received criticism from the federal government on the Canada Health Act.

Ottawa had actually reduced the Canada Health Transfer to New Brunswick by $140,216, as a result of patient charges for abortion services provided outside of hospitals in 2017.

“I think it’s very clear that there is an obstruction of health-care services in New Brunswick,” Edgar said.

Goodyear says losing the clinic will create a gap in health-care services, and that the Medical Society is still advocating for preservation of the clinic.

“Certainly the closure of the clinic does not mean that our efforts are going to be halted, at all,” said Goodyear.

“We would invite the Premier to sit down with the concerned doctors, the Medical Society and RHAs to have this discussion,” he said.

Read more: 36 senators sign letter in support of Clinic 554

Earlier this week, 36 senators from across Canada released a statement in support of Clinic 554, and Edgar said two out-of-province physicians reached out to him with offers

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