Tag: care

Supreme Court: Democrats and Republicans seek hints for how Barrett will rule on health care law

For the second day of Barrett’s questioning in the Senate Judiciary Committee, the health care law was a dominant topic on both sides of the aisle thanks to the looming November case the Supreme Court will hear on a Republican effort to strike down the law.

Both Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the panel’s top Democrat, asked President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee about the legal doctrine of “severability,” or whether the entire law can stand if one part of it is deemed unconstitutional, during Barrett’s second day of questions before the committee on Wednesday.

It’s a concept that could play a key factor in the case from Republican attorneys general and the Trump administration that seeks to strike down the Affordable Care Act case next month. They argue the entire law, commonly known as Obamacare, should be struck down because the law’s individual coverage mandate is unconstitutional.

Barrett explained to Feinstein, a California Democrat, that severability was like a game of “Jenga.”

“If you picture severability being like a Jenga game, it’s kind of like, if you pull one out, can you pull it out while it all stands? If you pull two out, will it all stand?” Barrett asked. “Severability is designed to say well would Congress still want the statute to stand even with the provision gone?”

Graham, during his questioning of Barrett, seemed to suggest he thought that the Affordable Care Act could be saved because of severability, saying the doctrine’s “goal is to preserve the statute if that is possible.”

“From a conservative point of view, generally speaking, we want legislative bodies to make laws, not judges,” Graham said, before asking Barrett, “Would it be further true, if you can preserve a statue you try to, if possible?”

“That is true,” Barrett said.

“That’s the law folks,” Graham responded.

The challenge to President Barack Obama’s health care law from Republican state attorneys general and the Trump administration has become a central issue in this year’s election in part due to Barrett’s confirmation. Democrats have focused their arguments during Barrett’s confirmation hearings on the way the law has provided care for individuals.

But Senate Republicans, who back the lawsuit to kill the law, have backed away from that implication in the lead-up to Election Day. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is also up for reelection, said during his debate Monday that “no one believes” the Supreme Court will strike down the entire law.
Graham, who is facing a tough reelection fight this year, raised the severability argument but also launched into another attack on the health care law, “Obamacare is on the ballot.”
How Jaime Harrison's campaign could spend $57 million before Election Day

The South Carolina Republican praised Barrett’s record, comparing her to Obama’s nominees Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, calling Barrett the first woman nominated to the high court who is “unashamedly pro-life.”

Just as they did during Tuesday’s lengthy questioning, Democrats sought to pin down Barrett on a number of topics she could hear in the future, including voting

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Pilot key worker scheme for relatives of care home residents announcement – Alzheimer’s Society comment

Kate Lee, Chief Executive Officer at Alzheimer’s Society, said:

‘Care home visitor restrictions, while intending to prevent the spread of coronavirus, have sadly had cruel and tragic consequences.  We’ve heard daily about the grief and despair of families via our Dementia Connect support line. People’s loved ones with dementia have felt bewildered, abandoned and in many tragic cases, faded away from the lack of personalised care, understanding and love that only family members can bring.

That’s why we’re delighted that the Government has listened to Alzheimer’s Society and other dementia charities, and announced a pilot scheme granting family carers key worker status. But ‘soon’ isn’t enough for people losing their partners, mums, dads and grandparents – we need the ‘when’ and the ‘where’, plus plans for national rollout. Time is of the essence.

‘Keeping coronavirus out of care homes has to remain an absolute priority, so these key family carers must get the regular testing and PPE they need to visit safely. This will give people with dementia better care and quite simply enjoyment of life that’s an essential right, while keeping them safe during the winter.’

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CJ Extra: Helping Hands Humane Society’s annual fundraiser supports, helps care for animals – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

Most events have changed in format this year because of COVID-19, and the same is true for Bone Appetit, a fundraiser that helps defray the costs of Helping Hands Humane Society while celebrating the human-animal connection.

Grace Clinton, director of business development and special events at Helping Hands Humane Society, answered questions about this year’s event.

Could you share Bone Appetit’s history along with its purpose and goals?

Since 2001, Bone Appétit has been our annual dinner and gala fundraiser to help the homeless animals in the Shawnee County community and the greater area of northeast Kansas. This essential fundraiser helps our organization care for over 6,000 animals who come through HHHS’s doors each year, and allows us to celebrate the human-animal bond with our supporters. These funds are vital to continuing our lifesaving mission.

When does this year’s event take place? How has COVID-19 changed this year’s event?

This year will be a bit different than in the past due to COVID-19 restrictions. It is most prudent to host this event virtually. While this decision was not an easy one to come to and we feel the loss of not getting to see everyone in person, we believe that community and public safety are pivotal elements in the work that we do here, and we needed to consider what would be the most prudent for our staff, volunteers and supporters. Our pets need their humans to remain well.

Additionally, COVID-19 has affected our operations tremendously. While we are very grateful for the outpouring of support from our community this year, it’s been a tough year for everyone and non-profits are no exception. We need fundraisers like this each year, even without a pandemic, but this year has proven to be particularly challenging.

The live, silent and wine auctions are some of the highlights of Bone Appétit. The auction will be hosted on a digital platform that you can access and bid from your computer, tablet or phone. Registration for this is free and the link is on our website.

During the livestream, which will take place from 7-8 p.m., you’ll hear about the progress being made to make Topeka a more humane city, as well as meet some adoptable pets and hear updates on some of the wonderful animals that your support has helped us save.

Finally, if you’d like to recreate the fun table atmosphere of our in-person gala, order a five or 10-person party pack, including a catered LaRocca’s Italian meal delivered by HHHS volunteers, a bottle of wine, and event swag bags for your guests. Register and buy your party packs on our website.

What is the admission fee? What will this fee cover?

The admission free for this year’s event is free. Anyone can watch the event on our Facebook or YouTube channels (we recommend YouTube as it allows clearer streaming), and can bid on the silent auction for free. If individuals are interested in receiving a commemorative event bag of goodies as an attendee,

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Health care law on line at court, but is it likely to fall?

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump’s nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage.

But that’s not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10, just one week after the election.

Yes, the Trump administration is asking the high court to throw out the Obama-era healthcare law, and if she is confirmed quickly Barrett could be on the Supreme Court when the court hears the case.

But even if the justices agree that the law’s mandate to buy health insurance is unconstitutional because Congress repealed the penalties for not complying, they could still leave the rest of the law alone. That would be consistent with other rulings in which the court excised a problematic provision from a law that was otherwise allowed to remain in force.

Democratic lawmakers, however, sounded alarm bells Monday, the start of four days of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Barrett.


The party’s vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, who sits on the committee, said Republicans are “trying to get a justice onto the Court in time to ensure they can strip away the protections of the Affordable Care Act.”

“If they succeed, it will result in millions of people losing access to health care at the worst possible time: in the middle of a pandemic,” the California senator said.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California’s other senator and the committee’s senior Democrat, said, “Health care coverage for millions of Americans is at stake with this nomination.” And Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island called Barrett’s nomination a “judicial torpedo aimed” at Affordable Care Act protections, including for preexisting health conditions. Other Democrats on the panel made similar points.

Democrats also repeatedly brought up words Barrett wrote in 2017, when she was a law professor, criticizing Chief Justice John Roberts’ 2012 opinion saving the Affordable Care Act. Barrett wrote that Roberts had “pushed the Affordable Care Act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute.”

After that 5-4 ruling, which split the court along ideological lines, the justices rejected a second major challenge to the healthcare law by a vote of 6-3 in 2015.

The case before the court this year stems from Congress’ decision in 2017 to eliminate the law’s unpopular fines for not having health insurance. Despite repealing the fines, lawmakers left in place the law’s requirement that virtually all Americans have coverage. Texas and other conservative-led states argue that the change makes the requirement unconstitutional and also dooms the rest of the law because the mandate was so central to it.

But the court could simply “sever” the mandate from the law and leave the rest of the law alone. Many observers see that as a likely outcome and note the upheaval that would result across the American healthcare system if the law were to be struck down in its entirety.

Before the Supreme Court’s term began in

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Law scholar Jonathan Turley takes on Chris Wallace regarding Amy Coney Barrett and the Affordable Care Act

Law scholar Jonathan Turley took on Fox News’s Chris Wallace regarding Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearings for the Supreme Court and the Affordable Care Act.





© Provided by Washington Examiner


“You need, truly, waders to get through the rising hypocrisy from both parties. That’s nothing new. Both parties are adopting the opposite views that they had in 2016. Although I’m not too sure the Democrats would be doing anything different if they were given this vacancy and this opportunity. But I want … Chris Wallace raises some good points. The lower court did strike down the ACA, but there … does not appear to be a majority of votes from our count of overturning the entire Act. In fact, the betting money is that conservatives might join liberals,” Turley said on Monday on Fox News.

Wallace interjected, “Jonathan, if I may, you know, the point I’m simply making is this: That’s what the court did. You are predicting how judges, including one who is not even on the court yet, are going to vote. I’m just saying.”

“No,” Turley said.

“Let me finish. You don’t know what’s going to happen, and I don’t know what’s going to happen. But the fact is for Democrats to talk about the cases of these individual people, and to say that their lives might be at stake is not an irrational leap. That’s the case that’s being heard by the court,” Wallace continued.

The segment broke for a commercial break but allowed Turley to respond when it returned.

“Well, what concerns me is that this is becoming a sort of milk carton hearing with all of these pictures surrounding the nominee. And the members making arguments of policy, saying how important the ACA is. At the same time, they are accusing her of being overtly political. Those are not consistent positions. They are arguing for the policy and benefits of the ACA to a future justice who is not supposed to consider her decision on policy. She just looks at whether law is constitutional or legal in every respect,” he said.

“Where Chris and I disagreed is that yes, the ACA was struck down by the lower court judge. But the betting of most legal experts is that at least two conservative justices will support sending it back to sever the one provision found to be unconstitutional. So my point is only that the assumption being made, being brought here with all of these pictures, is that this future justice is going to end healthcare for all these individuals. That’s just not likely, and more importantly, the arguments on the merits of the ACA, in my view, are really inappropriate for a confirmation hearing,” he added.

Barrett’s first day of hearings began Monday morning. Barrett is expected to be grilled by senators on issues such as healthcare and abortion beginning Tuesday.

Tags: News, Fox News, Amy Coney Barrett, Affordable care Act, Supreme Court

Original Author: Emma Colton

Original Location: Law scholar Jonathan

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18,000 elderly people have died of COVID-19 in British care homes and now Boris Johnson’s government is being accused of human rights abuse



a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor's hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty


© Getty
Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor’s hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty

  • The death of thousands of COVID-19 in British care homes was a violation of their human rights, according to Amnesty International.
  • The human rights organization has now called for the public inquiry, promised by the government in July, to begin immediately. 
  • The report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued on a blanket basis in care homes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

More than 18,000 untested elderly people died of COVID-19 in British care homes in what a damning new report from Amnesty International has described as a violation of their human rights.

Between March and June, over 28,116 “excess deaths” were recorded in care homes in England, with 18,500 of them confirmed to have been from COVID-19, according to the human rights group’s Crisis Response team.

The report. entitled As If Expendable: The UK Government’s Failure to Protect Older People in Care Homes during the COVID-19 Pandemic, found that many of the deaths were “entirely avoidable.”

Amnesty International, the world’s leading human rights group,  has called for the public inquiry promised by the government in July to begin immediately in a move that would compel the government to release confidential records and documents. 

Ministers, including Secretary of State for Health, Matt Hancock, would also be required to testify under oath and attempt to justify their actions, which Amnesty International has called “shockingly irresponsible.” 

Until March 13, two days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared coronavirus a global pandemic, Public Health England had said that “there is no need to do anything differently in any care setting at present.”

Four days later, the government ordered the discharge of 25,000 hospital patients into care homes and reiterated the instruction at the beginning of March despite the WHO confirming the existence of pre-symptomatic cases on the very same day. 

The Amnesty report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued to care managers who were told to add the instruction to residents’ files as a blanket approach.

Donatella Rovera, Amnesty International’s Senior Crisis Adviser and author of the report, told Business Insider: “The DNAR orders have not been revised since they were imposed and we are calling for the government’s Department of Health and Social Care to immediately investigate the issue and every single case individually. 

“It is imperative that lessons are learned so that the same mistakes are not repeated, and that those responsible for such disastrous decisions are held accountable.”

Care home residents were often denied access to NHS services they were entitled to, the report found. Staff and relatives told Amnesty that sending residents to hospital was heavily discouraged or outright refused, “violating their right to health and potentially their right to life, as well as their right to non-discrimination,” according to the report.

Official

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Dressing up pets for Halloween requires care, consideration.

Amy Carotenuto, Executive Director
 |  The Daytona Beach News-Journal

Dressing up in a Halloween costume with your best friend is pretty standard, but what if your best friend is your dog or even your cat?  Pets can participate in the Halloween fun thanks to the many adorable, funny and unexpected dog costumes out there.

Safety is an important consideration if your pet will be dressing up for Halloween this year. Whether you shop or make the costume yourself, ensure that the costume is safe and comfortable for your companion.

Pets should be able to walk, sit and move normally when wearing the costume. Look for costumes made of soft, stretchy material that moves with them. Although costumes should allow plenty of room for movement, make sure they aren’t too big or loose.  Costumes that are too big could cause your pet to feel like they will fall, which could cause them to simply refuse to walk.

Make sure masks, headbands, wigs and hats fit well and won’t interfere with your pets’ forward and side vision. Avoid anything that covers your pet’s nose, making it difficult to breathe.

Can your pup’s costume be seen in the dark? Go for costumes that contain bright colors or include reflective trim, rather than an all-black vampire costume.

Avoid flammable materials. Synthetic materials are more flammable than those made of natural fibers.  Read the tags or online product descriptions to avoid inadvertently selecting a highly flammable costume.

Look for choking hazards. If your pet is a chewer, decorations & buttons can pose a choking risk, so watch them closely. 

Pet costumes must accommodate leashes and harnesses. Also, make sure your costume allows you to hold your pet tight. Make sure your pet has his or her ticket home in the form of proper ID. Tags are a good idea even if your pet is microchipped. If an individual finds your lost pet, they can get you back together quickly with a current phone number on an ID tag.

Halloween celebrations can be overwhelming for pets, particularly with people wearing costumes and masks. If your pet tries to run away from that spooky witch or scary skeleton, make sure you are holding tight to that leash. If you notice that your pet seems stressed, don’t push it. Dogs bite more out of fear than aggression. It’s better to cut the evening short rather than have Fido in trouble for nipping a child.  

Be sure to try the costume on your pet before the big day. If it restricts mobility, doesn’t fit well or if your pet simply hates it, you’ll have time to find another costume.

Your pet may not like wearing a costume at first. Place the costume on your pet for a few minutes initially, then gradually increase wearing time. If your pet is obviously unhappy or tries to bite and tear the costume off, it may not be the best option. Try another costume which may be better tolerated.

If your pet doesn’t

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Morrison government to spend $1.6bn funding at-home care for older Australians

The Morrison government says it will fund 23,000 new packages for older Australians waiting to receive at home care, at a cost of $1.6bn.



a person sitting on a bed: Photograph: Yui Mok/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

Tuesday’s budget increases the number of approved home care packages available over the next four years in response to both the aged care royal commission and the Covid-19 pandemic.

The interim report of the royal commission found the government needed to act urgently to reduce waiting times for older Australians seeking in-home support.

For the past two years, more than 100,000 Australians have been on wait lists for approved home care packages, with tens of thousands entering residential care prematurely as a result.

Related: How much will I get from the 2020 federal budget tax cuts? More if you earn over $100,000

The government has been under pressure over its aged care response during the pandemic. There have been more than 670 deaths nationally in aged care facilities, more than 640 of those in Victoria, and older Australians have been left to languish in soiled beds and clothes without proper food and hydration.



The Australian government has announced additional funding for aged care after criticism of its response to the coronavirus pandemic.


© Photograph: Yui Mok/PA
The Australian government has announced additional funding for aged care after criticism of its response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The health minister, Greg Hunt, said on Tuesday there would be an extra $81m for additional staff and training, on top of $101.2m the government announced for this purpose in March.

The health budget comprises $467bn in overall spending over four years, $16.5bn of that makes up the emergency response to the pandemic.

The government says it will increase funding for hospitals by $33.6bn over the new five-year national health reform agreement and provide $5.7bn for mental health, including already announced funding to double the number if Medicare-funded psychology sessions from 10 to 20.

Related: Australian treasurer Josh Frydenberg’s 2020 budget speech – in full

Hunt said the budget would fund the government’s ongoing response to the pandemic and “helps chart the road out”, with aged care “a particular focus”.

Total funding in aged care will be $23.9bn over the forward estimates – an increase of $2.2bn Hunt said – including the $1.6bn for home care packages.

The treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, said on Tuesday night that aged care was “one of the greatest challenges we face in delivering essential services to Australians”.

He said additional responses and funding would be informed by the final report from the royal commission.

“The government will provide a comprehensive response to the final recommendations following receipt of that report,” he said. “This will involve significant additional investment.”

Tuesday’s budget includes $2.3bn in announced funding for investment in Covid-19 treatments and vaccines and funding for the listing of new drugs on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, including Lynparza for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Related: Less Thatcher, more vanilla slice: Frydenberg’s 2020 Australian budget packs a sugar hit | Amy Remeikis

The government will provide $750m in funding for Covid-19 testing, $171m for the extended operation of up

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Morrison government to spend $1.6bn funding at-home care for older Australians | Australian budget 2020

The Morrison government says it will fund 23,000 new packages for older Australians waiting to receive at home care, at a cost of $1.6bn.

Tuesday’s budget increases the number of approved home care packages available over the next four years in response to both the aged care royal commission and the Covid-19 pandemic.

The interim report of the royal commission found the government needed to act urgently to reduce waiting times for older Australians seeking in-home support.

For the past two years, more than 100,000 Australians have been on wait lists for approved home care packages, with tens of thousands entering residential care prematurely as a result.

The government has been under pressure over its aged care response during the pandemic. There have been more than 670 deaths nationally in aged care facilities, more than 640 of those in Victoria, and older Australians have been left to languish in soiled beds and clothes without proper food and hydration.

The health minister, Greg Hunt, said on Tuesday there would be an extra $81m for additional staff and training, on top of $101.2m the government announced for this purpose in March.

The health budget comprises $467bn in overall spending over four years, $16.5bn of that makes up the emergency response to the pandemic.

The government says it will increase funding for hospitals by $33.6bn over the new five-year national health reform agreement and provide $5.7bn for mental health, including already announced funding to double the number if Medicare-funded psychology sessions from 10 to 20.

Hunt said the budget would fund the government’s ongoing response to the pandemic and “helps chart the road out”, with aged care “a particular focus”.

Total funding in aged care will be $23.9bn over the forward estimates – an increase of $2.2bn Hunt said – including the $1.6bn for home care packages.

The treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, said on Tuesday night that aged care was “one of the greatest challenges we face in delivering essential services to Australians”.

He said additional responses and funding would be informed by the final report from the royal commission.

“The government will provide a comprehensive response to the final recommendations following receipt of that report,” he said. “This will involve significant additional investment.”

Tuesday’s budget includes $2.3bn in announced funding for investment in Covid-19 treatments and vaccines and funding for the listing of new drugs on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, including Lynparza for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

The government will provide $750m in funding for Covid-19 testing, $171m for the extended operation of up to 150 dedicated respiratory clinics to manage and diagnose Covid-19 cases, and $112m for the continuation of Medicare rebated telehealth services for GP, allied health and specialist consultations.

The government said it would provide a further $3.9bn for the NDIS.

The government said it would also provide a “targeted capital gains tax exemption” for granny flats – where there is a written agreement – that will apply to older Australians and Australians with a disability.

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