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LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locks up Michigan City jail door | Entertainment



LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locks up Michigan City jail door

LaPorte County Commissioner Richard Mrozinski, Museum Director Keri Teller Jakubowski and LaPorte County Historical Society Board President Bruce Johnson pose with the historic Michigan City jail door that was acquired by the LaPorte County Historical Society Museum.




The LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locked up its latest acquisition: the historic jail door from the Michigan City Superior Courthouse.

The museum, at 2405 Indiana Ave., LaPorte, obtained the door to the jail cell from the 111-year-old courthouse at 300 Washington St. where prisoners were held during their daily trial proceedings. It’s actually two doors: a barred door and a steel door with a peep hole that allowed sound and light to enter the holding cell.

“LaPorte County Commissioner Richard Mrozinski was instrumental in acquiring the door on behalf of the Museum,” the LaPorte County Historical Society said in a press release.

“The jail door was in an area of the courthouse that is currently undergoing renovation. The physical transfer of the door was accomplished by Marquiss Electric, Inc. of Michigan City.”

The museum also has a jail door from the third LaPorte County Jail, which was built in 1857 next to the defunct Shafer’s Laundry that was torn down to make room for the LaPorte County Complex. Both doors are similar in design and date back to the same period between the late 1800s and the early 1990s.

“Both are intriguing complements to the police and fire department exhibits,” the LaPorte County Historical Society said in a press release.

The museum is now open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and requires visitors to wear masks during the pandemic.

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Worcester Chamber Music Society shines in first live-streamed Spotlight Concert – Entertainment & Life – telegram.com

The Worcester Chamber Music Society’s first Spotlight Concert — the opening of a series of four hour-long, live-streamed programs the group is broadcasting this fall from Joy of Music’s Shapiro Hall — took place on Thursday night. For this inaugural installment, violist Mark Berger and pianist Randall Hodgkinson joined forces in an enticing mix of pieces by Arvo Pärt, Berger and Johannes Brahms.

 

The night’s most substantial offering was Brahms’ 1894 Viola Sonata no. 1. Originally written for clarinet but transcribed by the composer for viola, it’s a sober piece but a conspicuously hopeful one for a time of pandemic: The music begins in a crepuscular F minor but works its way over four movements to an exuberant conclusion in F major.

 

Thursday’s performance was well-directed and flexible. The lyrical viola lines in the brooding first movement sang fervently, while there was an amiable rusticity to the dancing gestures of the third. Balances between Berger and Hodgkinson seemed consistently well-judged, particularly in the Adagio, where the music’s frequent soft dynamics belied a palpable intensity to the night’s reading.

 

Equally engaging was the Brahms’ finale, taken at a brisk clip and exhibiting a terrific sense of emotional release. Hodgkinson’s execution of the demanding piano part there was nothing short of breathtaking.

 

Opening the night was Pärt’s “Fratres.” Written in 1977, the score is, perhaps, Pärt’s most familiar work, alternating spare chorales, bravura arpeggios and gently unfolding melodic lines.

 

On Thursday, the piece’s virtuosic viola arpeggios shimmered, while the piano’s lean, hymn-like figures provided a potent contrast. As in the Brahms, the blend between players here was impressive, nowhere more so than in the concluding duet between viola harmonics and the piano’s melodic line.

 

In between came the world premiere of Berger’s “Atalerix,” the first movement of a projected piano suite called “Spirit Animals” that’s inspired by the composer’s children’s house pets. Accordingly, “Atalerix” is an homage to Berger’s son’s hedgehog, Zilla.

 

Fittingly, it’s an engaging, whimsical little effort, running just about four minutes. The piece opens with scurrying “rodent-like” figures that give way, gradually, to chordal episodes and inquisitive melodic lines. There’s no lack of personality in it — an impish wit pervades the whole — and Berger’s writing showcases both his technical prowess and a clear command of musical shape and drama.

 

Hodgkinson delivered a lucid performance of this charmer. To be sure, on the merits of “Atalerix,” one looks forward to the successive installments in this cycle.

 

On the whole, then, this first Spotlight Concert did offer what Berger, in some introductory remarks, described as an “intimate setting” for some fine music making. True, one missed the natural resonance of the concert hall: on my end, the program’s climactic moments came across a bit too intensely, particularly in the Pärt.

 

But, especially given the context of the day, that’s a small complaint. Indeed, the WCMS’s remaining series’ offerings — a Schubert survey, a solo cello recital, and a concert of violin duets — promise to be both timely and

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Traveling Indiana Historical Society exhibit on display in LaPorte | Entertainment



Traveling Indiana Historical Society exhibit on display in LaPorte

“A Perfect Likeness: Care and Identification of Family Photographs” will be displayed through Nov. 3 at the LaPorte County Historical Society Museum located at 2405 Indiana Ave. in La Porte.




A traveling Indiana Historical Society exhibit will teach people how to take care of their old family photographs, including images that date back to the 19th century.

“A Perfect Likeness: Care and Identification of Family Photographs” will be displayed through Nov. 3 at the LaPorte County Historical Society Museum located at 2405 Indiana Ave. in LaPorte.

On loan from Indianapolis, the exhibit focuses how to pass down photographs from generation to generation. Sponsored by the Indiana Historical Society and the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, it also shows how to take care of and preserve antiquated media like the daguerreotype, tintype, ambrotype, cabinet card and carte de visite.

“Although there is an established profession dedicated to conserving photographs, much of the research does not trickle down to the average person with cherished family photographs,” guest curator and historic photograph consultant Joan Hostetler said. “The goal of this exhibit is to bridge the gap by relaying information to the public on identifying, dating and caring for their photographs.”

Schools, libraries, museums and historic societies can book traveling exhibits from the Indiana Historic Society in Indianapolis by contacting Karen DePauw at [email protected] or 317-233-3110.

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