Tag: European

European Parliament cements position on climate change before haggling by member states

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union lawmakers have backed a plan to cut greenhouse gases by 60% from 1990 levels by 2030, hoping member states will not try to water the target down during upcoming negotiations.

FILE PHOTO: A general view shows European Council President Charles Michel addressing an extraordinary plenary session of the EU Parliament following an EU leaders summit, in Brussels, Belgium July 23, 2020. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Results of the vote released on Thursday confirm their preliminary votes earlier this week on a landmark law to make the EU’s climate targets legally binding.

The law, which contains the new EU emissions-cutting goal for 2030, passed by a large majority of 231 votes.

Parliament must now agree the final law with the EU’s 27 member countries, only a few of whom have said they would support a 60% emissions-cutting target. Lawmakers want to avoid countries whittling it away to below the level of emissions cuts proposed by the EU executive of at least 55%.

The EU’s current 2030 target is a 40% emissions cut.

Parliament also supported a proposal to launch an independent scientific council to advise on climate policy – a system already in place in Britain and Sweden – and a carbon budget, setting out the emissions the EU could produce without scuppering its climate commitments.

With climate-related impacts such as more intense heatwaves and wildfires already felt across Europe, and thousands of young people taking to the streets last month to demand tougher action, the EU is under pressure to ramp up its climate policies.

Groups representing investors with 62 trillion euros in assets under management, plus hundreds of businesses and NGOs on Thursday wrote to EU leaders urging them to agree an emissions-cutting target of at least 55% for 2030.

Scientists say this target, which has been proposed by the European Commission, is the minimum effort needed to give the EU a realistic shot at becoming climate neutral by 2050. The Commission wants the new 2030 goal finalised by the end of the year.

However, the climate law will require compromise from member countries. Wealthier states with large renewable energy resources are pushing for deeper emissions cuts, but coal-heavy countries including Poland and Czech Republic fear the economic fallout of tougher targets.

Given its political sensitivity, heads of government will likely decide their position on the 2030 target by unanimity, meaning one country could block it.

Reporting by Kate Abnett, editing by Marine Strauss and Philippa Fletcher

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European Parliament set for tight vote on ‘historic’ climate law

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Lawmakers in the European Parliament expect a tight vote on Tuesday on the European Union’s new climate target for 2030, with support splintered over the bloc’s green ambitions.

FILE PHOTO: A general view shows European Council President Charles Michel addressing an extraordinary plenary session of the EU Parliament following an EU leaders summit, in Brussels, Belgium July 23, 2020. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

The assembly will vote in the evening on a landmark bill to make EU climate targets legally binding. The most contentious part is a new target for emissions cuts this decade.

The EU’s current goal is to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, against 1990 levels. That needs upgrading if the bloc is to become climate neutral by 2050.

The European Commission last month proposed a 2030 emissions cut of “at least 55%”, which it said was economically feasible but would require tougher policies for many sectors, including tighter car emissions standards and higher carbon costs for industry and airlines.

The European Parliament’s environment committee last month voted for a 60% cut target for 2030, and groups representing just under half of the assembly said they would back this goal on Tuesday. Some officials said enough extra votes had been secured for a razor-thin majority.

“I think we have a historic opportunity to take the climate policy to higher levels,” said Sweden’s Jytte Guteland, lead lawmaker on the issue.

“It will be a very tight result,” said Pascal Canfin, chair of Parliament’s environment committee.

Conservative lawmakers are meanwhile rallying behind a proposal by the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP) to cut emissions by at least 55% this decade.

“The 60% is stretching too much,” German EPP lawmaker Peter Liese said, adding that he was “quite optimistic” his proposal would gain majority support.

Some Green lawmakers said they could support a 55% goal, but took issue with EPP’s plan to count carbon sinks – emissions absorbed by forests – and carbon credits from overseas projects towards the target.

“That is a clear red line for us,” Green lawmaker Bas Eickhout said.

The split in Parliament reflects broader divisions among the EU’s 27 countries, which must also approve the 2030 goal.

Wealthy western and northern countries largely back an emissions cut of at least 55%, while others oppose tougher climate policies that could hit their strategic economic sectors, such as coal mining in Poland and automobile manufacturing in the Czech Republic.

Reporting by Kate Abnett; Editing by John Chalmers and Alex Richardson

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European Green Law Risks Delay as Leaders May Defer Decision

(Bloomberg) —



a close up of a windmill: Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.


© Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.

A landmark law to strengthen European Union climate policies and make the 2050 goal of climate-neutrality irreversible risks falling off a fast-track approval process, as the bloc’s leaders take time to consider the economic impact of the unprecedented overhaul in the midst of the deepest recession on record.

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EU heads of government plan to discuss the draft measure at their two-day gathering next week but may stop short of supporting a more ambitious intermediate target for 2030, according to a draft of their joint communique seen by Bloomberg News. Their political endorsement, key for ministers to reach an agreement on the technical details of the law, and a stricter emissions-reduction goal for the next decade may come only in December.

“The European Council considers that the updated target should be delivered collectively by the EU in the most cost-effective manner possible, and that all member states will participate in this effort, balancing considerations of fairness and solidarity,” according to the draft of the statement to be adopted by the leaders after their Oct. 15-16 summit in Brussels. The Council of leaders will “return to the issue at its December meeting,” according to the draft, which is still subject to changes.

At stake is the pace of a green revolution that will affect everything from transport to farming, putting the 27-nation EU in sync with the goals of the Paris Agreement to fight climate change. The European Climate Law will pave the way for a torrent of regulations that will impose stricter emissions standards, strengthen the region’s carbon market and further stimulate clean energy production.

The proposed climate target will be discussed by energy ministers from national governments at an informal meeting on Tuesday. German Economy and Energy Minister Peter Altmaier, who will chair the gathering told reporters he “wholeheartedly” supported the Green Deal. EU Energy Commissioner Kadri Simson told a briefing before the ministerial meeting that while the deeper emissions reduction target is feasible, it will not be easy.

“I believe we’re all on the same page when it comes to the need to act quickly,” Simson said. “What we need to focus on is how exactly we will move forward, how different member states can contribute and where EU-level measures can have added value.”

2030 Goal

The European Commission, the bloc’s regulatory arm, proposed last month that as part of the Green Deal the bloc deepen its 2030 emissions-cut goal to at least 55%. The current target target, agreed only 6 years ago, is a reduction of at least 40% from 1990 levels.

“To meet the objective of a climate-neutral EU by 2050 in line with the objectives of the Paris Agreement, the EU needs to update its ambition for the coming decade, and its climate and energy policy framework,” leaders will acknowledge next week, according to the draft of their statement. “All relevant EU legislation and

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European Parliament Set for Tight Vote on ‘Historic’ Climate Law | World News

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Lawmakers in the European Parliament expect a tight vote on Tuesday on the European Union’s new climate target for 2030, with support splintered over the bloc’s green ambitions.

The assembly will vote in the evening on a landmark bill to make EU climate targets legally binding. The most contentious part is a new target for emissions cuts this decade.

The EU’s current goal is to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, against 1990 levels. That needs upgrading if the bloc is to become climate neutral by 2050.

The European Commission last month proposed a 2030 emissions cut of “at least 55%”, which it said was economically feasible but would require tougher policies for many sectors, including tighter car emissions standards and higher carbon costs for industry and airlines.

The European Parliament’s environment committee last month voted for a 60% cut target for 2030, and groups representing just under half of the assembly said they would back this goal on Tuesday. Some officials said enough extra votes had been secured for a razor-thin majority.

“I think we have a historic opportunity to take the climate policy to higher levels,” said Sweden’s Jytte Guteland, lead lawmaker on the issue.

“It will be a very tight result,” said Pascal Canfin, chair of Parliament’s environment committee.

Conservative lawmakers are meanwhile rallying behind a proposal by the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP) to cut emissions by at least 55% this decade.

“The 60% is stretching too much,” German EPP lawmaker Peter Liese said, adding that he was “quite optimistic” his proposal would gain majority support.

Some Green lawmakers said they could support a 55% goal, but took issue with EPP’s plan to count carbon sinks – emissions absorbed by forests – and carbon credits from overseas projects towards the target.

“That is a clear red line for us,” Green lawmaker Bas Eickhout said.

The split in Parliament reflects broader divisions among the EU’s 27 countries, which must also approve the 2030 goal.

Wealthy western and northern countries largely back an emissions cut of at least 55%, while others oppose tougher climate policies that could hit their strategic economic sectors, such as coal mining in Poland and automobile manufacturing in the Czech Republic.

(Reporting by Kate Abnett; Editing by John Chalmers and Alex Richardson)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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European Green Law Risks Delay as Leaders Seek to Defer Decision

(Bloomberg) —



a close up of a windmill: Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.


© Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
Wind turbines operated by Vattenfall AB sit on a wind farm in Aggersund, Denmark.

A landmark law to strengthen European Union climate policies and make the 2050 goal of climate-neutrality irreversible risks falling off a fast-track approval process, as the bloc’s leaders take time to consider the economic impact of the unprecedented overhaul in the midst of the deepest recession on record.

Loading...

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EU heads of government plan to discuss the draft measure at their two-day gathering next week but may stop short of supporting a more ambitious intermediate target for 2030, according to a draft of their joint communique seen by Bloomberg News. Their political endorsement, key for ministers to reach an agreement on the technical details of the law, and a stricter emissions-reduction goal for the next decade may come only in December.

“The European Council considers that the updated target should be delivered collectively by the EU in the most cost-effective manner possible, and that all member states will participate in this effort, balancing considerations of fairness and solidarity,” according to the draft of the statement to be adopted by the leaders after their Oct. 15-16 summit in Brussels. The wording is subject to changes before leaders meet.

At stake is the pace of a green revolution that will affect everything from transport to farming, putting the 27-nation EU in sync with the goals of the Paris Agreement to fight climate change. The European Climate Law will pave the way for a torrent of regulations that will impose stricter emissions standards, strengthen the region’s carbon market and further stimulate clean energy production.

2030 Goal

The European Commission, the bloc’s regulatory arm, proposed last month that as part of the Green Deal the bloc deepen its 2030 emissions-cut goal to at least 55%. The current target target, agreed only 6 years ago, is a reduction of at least 40% from 1990 levels.

To become binding, the climate law needs support from national governments and the European Parliament in negotiations that are yet to begin. To enter the talks, ministers from member states need to agree on a common stance, a move that traditionally needs political guidance from the leaders on climate issues.

The challenge is that, unlike ministers, leaders make decisions by unanimity and Poland, which relies on coal for some 70% of power generation, has said it needs to carefully assess the economic impact of the tighter climate goals before making a decision. The government in Warsaw declined to commit to climate neutrality at a national level at an EU summit last year while stopping short of blocking a deal on a Europe-wide objective to eliminate emissions by 2050.

Germany, which chairs the talks as the holder of the EU’s rotating presidency, wants to reach a deal on the climate law before the end of this year. While it has already secured the required majority support for the 55% emissions-reduction goal, according to two diplomats with knowledge of the talks,

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Rocket Pharmaceuticals Announces Two Presentations at the European Society for Immunodeficiencies 2020 Meeting

Rocket Pharmaceuticals Announces Two Presentations at the European Society for Immunodeficiencies 2020 Meeting

–Oral Presentation to Provide Update on Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial Data of RP-L201 for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I–

–Poster Presentation to Highlight Preclinical Data on RP-L401 for Infantile Malignant Osteopetrosis–

Rocket Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: RCKT) (“Rocket”), a clinical-stage company advancing an integrated and sustainable pipeline of genetic therapies for rare childhood disorders, today announces two presentations at the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) 2020 Meeting to be held virtually October 14-17, 2020. An oral presentation will provide an update on data from the Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RP-L201 for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I (LAD-I). An e-poster will highlight preclinical study data on RP-L401 for Infantile Malignant Osteopetrosis (IMO).

Additional presentation details can be found below:

Oral Presentation

Title: A Phase 1/2 Study of Lentiviral-Mediated Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy for Pediatric Patients with Severe Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I (LAD-I): Results from Phase 1

Session Title:
Treatment

Presenter: Donald B. Kohn, M.D., Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology), Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, and member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at the University of California, Los Angeles

Session Date: Friday, October 16, 2020

Session Time: 10:45 a.m. – 12:01 p.m. CEST

Lecture Time: 11:45 a.m. CEST

Location: Hall D

This session will be followed by a Q&A from 12:01 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. CEST

E-Poster

Title: Preclinical Efficacy and Safety of EFS.HTCIRG1-LV Supports IMO Gene Therapy Clinical Trial Initiation

Presenter: Ilana Moscatelli, Ph.D., Associate Researcher, Division of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Lund University, Sweden

About Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I

Severe Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I (LAD-I) is a rare, autosomal recessive pediatric disease caused by mutations in the ITGB2 gene encoding for the beta-2 integrin component CD18. CD18 is a key protein that facilitates leukocyte adhesion and extravasation from blood vessels to combat infections. As a result, children with severe LAD-I (less than 2% normal expression) are often affected immediately after birth. During infancy, they suffer from recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections that respond poorly to antibiotics and require frequent hospitalizations. Children who survive infancy experience recurrent severe infections including pneumonia, gingival ulcers, necrotic skin ulcers, and septicemia. Without a successful bone marrow transplant, mortality in patients with severe LAD-I is 60-75% prior to the age of 2 and survival beyond the age of 5 is uncommon. There is a high unmet medical need for patients with severe LAD-I.

Rocket’s LAD-I research is made possible by a grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Grant Number CLIN2-11480). The contents of this press release are solely the responsibility of Rocket and do not necessarily represent the official views of CIRM or any other Agency of the State of California.

About Infantile Malignant Osteopetrosis

Infantile Malignant Osteopetrosis (IMO) is a rare, severe autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the TCIRG1 gene, which is critical for the process of bone resorption. Mutations in TCIRG1 interfere with the function of osteoclasts, cells which

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