Tag: Fall

Lipocine Announces Presentations at the 21st Annual Fall Meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America

SALT LAKE CITY, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Lipocine Inc. (NASDAQ: LPCN), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on metabolic and endocrine disorders, today announced it will present results from studies suggesting that low testosterone levels may play an important role on the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in men as well as the safety and efficacy of TLANDO™, an oral testosterone replacement therapy without a dose titration requirement, at the 21st Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (“SMSNA”). Lipocine will outline the possible mechanisms and clinical evidence that suggests men with low testosterone have poor COVID-19 outcomes, and the rationale of using an oral testosterone therapy for men with COVID-19. Results from the previously completed dose validation (“DV”) study of a fixed dose TLANDO in hypogonadal males will also be presented at the meeting.  The presentations will take place virtually on November 9, 2020 from 7:00 p.m.9:00 p.m. EST during Session 2 (Androgens and Ejaculation/Orgasm Disorders). 

https://www.smsna.org/V1/2020/program/scientific-program?where_person=44
https://www.smsna.org/V1/2020/program/scientific-program?where_person=42

“We know that while COVID-19 infection rates are comparable between men and women, men are developing severe symptoms and dying at a significant higher rate than women. Furthermore, men with comorbidities commonly associated with lower testosterone are at greater risk for severe disease and death,” said Dr. Mahesh Patel, Chairman, President and CEO of Lipocine Inc.  “The presentation on COVID-19 highlight key clinical evidences suggesting that low testosterone levels may play an important role on the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in men. Based on the published data, the use of oral testosterone with the goal of achieving physiological testosterone levels should be evaluated in clinical trials of COVID-19.”

Dr. Anthony DelConte, Chief Medical Director of Lipocine further stated, “TLANDO will be the first oral testosterone for treatment hypogonadism without titration requirement. It is expected to be easy to prescribe and use.” Dr. DelConte added, “The SMSNA presentation on TLANDO highlights the key safety and efficacy data from multiple clinical studies supporting TLANDO’s ability to effectively restore testosterone levels in hypogonadal men without need for any dose adjustment.”

Is Oral Testosterone a Potential Treatment for COVID-19 in Men? (Benjamin J. Bruno et al)

The authors performed a literature search to understand the possible mechanisms and clinical evidence concerning testosterone levels in COVID-19 patients.  A recent clinical study investigating testosterone levels in men with COVID-19 found 80% of men who died due to COVID-19 had low total or bioavailable testosterone levels at the time of hospital admission. Those with severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (“ARDS”) had acutely depressed total testosterone compared to patients who did not exhibit severe ARDS. The mean total testosterone levels for men who required invasive ventilation was 29 ng/dL (normal range ~300-1100 ng/dL), whereas those who were discharged from the ICU had mean total T of 254 ng/dL at the time of ICU admission.

In comparison to other routes of testosterone administration, oral testosterone therapy may be the most convenient and suitable for acute treatment of COVID-19 in

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to follow his predecessor Shinzo Abe’s policies including the coronavirus pandemic response, Suga has pledged to allow insurance coverage for expensive fertility treatments.

On the pandemic impact on employment and wages, 47% of Japan firms suffered it, causing many to curb new hiring, slash wages and reduce staff, the survey showed.

One third of firms expect employment to remain short of pre-pandemic levels at the year end, while a slim majority, 52% of firms, saw capital expenditure would undershoot their initial plans, dampening prospects for sustained economic recovery.

Reporting by Tetsushi Kajimoto; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to follow his predecessor Shinzo Abe’s policies including the coronavirus pandemic response, Suga has pledged to allow insurance coverage for expensive fertility treatments.

On the pandemic impact on employment and wages, 47% of Japan firms suffered it, causing many to curb new hiring, slash wages and reduce staff, the survey showed.

One third of firms expect employment to remain short of pre-pandemic levels at the year end, while a slim majority, 52% of firms, saw capital expenditure would undershoot their initial plans, dampening prospects for sustained economic recovery.

(Reporting by Tetsushi Kajimoto; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

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Health care law on line at court, but is it likely to fall?

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump’s nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage.

But that’s not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10, just one week after the election.

Yes, the Trump administration is asking the high court to throw out the Obama-era healthcare law, and if she is confirmed quickly Barrett could be on the Supreme Court when the court hears the case.

But even if the justices agree that the law’s mandate to buy health insurance is unconstitutional because Congress repealed the penalties for not complying, they could still leave the rest of the law alone. That would be consistent with other rulings in which the court excised a problematic provision from a law that was otherwise allowed to remain in force.

Democratic lawmakers, however, sounded alarm bells Monday, the start of four days of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Barrett.


The party’s vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, who sits on the committee, said Republicans are “trying to get a justice onto the Court in time to ensure they can strip away the protections of the Affordable Care Act.”

“If they succeed, it will result in millions of people losing access to health care at the worst possible time: in the middle of a pandemic,” the California senator said.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California’s other senator and the committee’s senior Democrat, said, “Health care coverage for millions of Americans is at stake with this nomination.” And Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island called Barrett’s nomination a “judicial torpedo aimed” at Affordable Care Act protections, including for preexisting health conditions. Other Democrats on the panel made similar points.

Democrats also repeatedly brought up words Barrett wrote in 2017, when she was a law professor, criticizing Chief Justice John Roberts’ 2012 opinion saving the Affordable Care Act. Barrett wrote that Roberts had “pushed the Affordable Care Act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute.”

After that 5-4 ruling, which split the court along ideological lines, the justices rejected a second major challenge to the healthcare law by a vote of 6-3 in 2015.

The case before the court this year stems from Congress’ decision in 2017 to eliminate the law’s unpopular fines for not having health insurance. Despite repealing the fines, lawmakers left in place the law’s requirement that virtually all Americans have coverage. Texas and other conservative-led states argue that the change makes the requirement unconstitutional and also dooms the rest of the law because the mandate was so central to it.

But the court could simply “sever” the mandate from the law and leave the rest of the law alone. Many observers see that as a likely outcome and note the upheaval that would result across the American healthcare system if the law were to be struck down in its entirety.

Before the Supreme Court’s term began in

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Manitowoc Historical Society plans fall stroll for mid-October, plus more local news

Waldo Boulevard opens to traffic after ceremony

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Manitowoc County Historical Society to host Fall Stroll in mid-October



a tree in front of a house: Manitowoc County's Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.


© Courtesy of Manitowoc County Historical Society
Manitowoc County’s Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.

Manitowoc County Historical Society, 924 Pinecrest Road in Manitowoc, is offering a fall site stroll for guests to enjoy the natural beauty of the historic Pinecrest Village from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 16-17.

The village is open for strolling amid the coronavirus pandemic, but all historic buildings are closed to the public. The McAllister House Welcome Center will be open for restrooms and the Museum Store. When people are indoors, masks are required. Restrooms are also available on the back of the General Store/Meat Market.

Pick-up will also be held during these times for those who have reserved an All Hallow’s Eve STEAM Pack. Packs will be available for pick-up on the McAllister House Welcome Center front porch.

Also available for pick-up on the porch will be an outdoor history scavenger hunt. Identify items throughout the historical village and in the windows of the historic structures.

There is no admission charge for the fall site stroll. As a non-profit organization, the museum said it “would greatly appreciate your donation to assist in supporting our Manitowoc County Historical Society during this time. A donation box will be available on the porch of the McAllister House Welcome Center.”

Besides the two-day fall site stroll, the Historical Society grounds and buildings are closed for the year. Local history information is always available on the museum’s website at ManitowocCountyHistory.org and its social media channels. 

‘InfoFun Day’ set for Oct. 17 at Lighthouse Inn

The Manitowoc County “That’s Enough Already” (TEA) movement said in a news release that it will host an “InfoFun Day” on Oct. 17 at the Lighthouse Inn, 1515 Memorial Drive, Two Rivers. It said doors will open at 1 p.m. with activities starting at 2 p.m.

Activities include a “Best Dressed Patriot” contest and a trivia contest. For the trivia contest, teams will consist of four people with registration ending at 1:45 p.m. on the day of the event. To pre-register, call 920-732-3200 or email with subject line “TEA — Contest Entry” to [email protected] with team name and list of members.

The group said “several speakers have been secured and we are looking for appropriate vendors. Other activities available are Jenga or play a hand of sheepshead.”

For more information, call 920-732-3200 or email [email protected]

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Preservation Society of Charleston’s Fall Tours about to begin, with COVID-related changes | Features

For more than four decades, the Preservation Society of Charleston’s Fall Tours have been a regular feature of autumn, offering a chance to tour grand historic homes and gardens, but the novel coronavirus pandemic has required some significant changes.

Notably, this year tours that run from Oct. 8 through Nov. 7 will not be taking guests inside homes. The Preservation Society is instead offering “Piazzas, Porches & Gardens Tours” along with a large selection of themed guided walking tours. 



How SC women fought for and earned the right the vote

“We really put a lot of thought into how to handle an educational program during COVID,” said Kristopher King, executive director of the 100-year-old preservation group. “What we’ve really focused on is staying outside.”

“We’re actually able to layer in a lot more history about Charleston architecture and gardens,” he said. “We can really talk about the stuff that really gets us excited — the history, architecture and gardens.”

The Fall Tours are the Preservation Society’s largest annual fundraising event, attracting local residents as well as tourists from other states and nations.

A chance to visit the private gardens hidden behind brick walls and iron gates on the lower Charleston peninsula has always been a draw for the tours, and none of the homeowners involved declined to participate this year, according to tours manager Susan Epstein.



Preservation Society fall tours (copy) (copy)

The Preservation Society of Charleston will host its 44th annual Fall Tours Oct. 8-Nov. 7, 2020. Preservation Society of Charleston/Provided


“I had one homeowner call and tell me her garden had never looked better, because everyone’s been working in the gardens,” she said.

The project is a large undertaking, involving more than 150 volunteers and a half-dozen paid guides. Tour sizes will be limited in order to maintain social distancing, with most groups being 10 or 20 people at a time.

“It will be more like going on a private tour,” said Epstein.

Add up all the different tours, dates and time slots, and there are about 1,000 tickets offered, according to the Preservation Society. Prices range from $30 to $150, and face masks will be required.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

“If people don’t want to wear a mask, they’re not going to come on tour with us, and we’re OK with that,” said King.



Richard-Hernandez Alley.jpg (copy)

The Fall Tours offerings include a “Photography Walkabout and Workshop” tour of the French Quarter and the South of Broad Street area, with a focus on picturesque streets and alleys. This photograph of Stoll’s Alley was taken by Richard Hernandez of Goose Creek in 2018. Richard Hernandez/Provided




Philadelphia Alley handprint (copy) (copy)

A complete handprint can be seen in this brick on Philadelphia Alley, near Queen Street. The alley is named after the Pennsylvania city because it provided aid to Charleston after a disastrous fire in 1810. File/Brad Nettles/Staff




The tours are:

  • Curated Garden Tours, led by horticulture professionals. This is one of the most expensive tours, at $150 for nonmembers.
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Personal Income And Savings Fall As Government Supports Fade

By Robert Hughes

Personal income fell 2.7 percent in August, according to data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Personal income data over the past six months have been sharply distorted by lockdown policies which caused massive layoffs, and government stimulus programs that sent transfer payments skyrocketing. As those payments fade, measures of personal income and components are returning to trend.

Disposable personal income fell 3.2 percent after a 0.3 percent increase in July. The personal savings rate fell in August, coming in at 14.1 percent of disposable income following rates down from 17.7 percent in July and a peak of 33.6 percent in April (see first chart).

The drop in personal income consisted, in part, of a 1.3 percent increase in wages and salaries. Wages and salaries, which typically account for about half of personal income, rose as some employees went back to work after lockdown policies were eased. However, wages and salaries are still down 3.9 percent since February (see second chart). Supplements to wages and salaries (primarily employer contributions to pension and insurance funds and government social-insurance programs) which typically account for another 12 percent of personal income also posted a gain, rising 0.8 percent in August but are still down 2.1 percent from February.

Proprietors’ income jumped 2.7 percent for the month following a 1.2 percent rise in July while income on assets (interest and dividends) rose 0.2 percent in the latest month. Since February, these two components are still off 5.7 percent and 3.4 percent, respectively (see second chart).

Personal transfer payments fell 14.8 percent in August, the fourth consecutive decline after a massive 100.5 percent gain in April. Personal tax payments rose 1.3 percent in August, leaving disposable income with a drop of 3.2 percent. Since February, transfer payments are still up 29.9 percent while tax payments are down 4.2 percent (shown as a positive on the second chart since lower tax payments are a positive for disposable personal income).

On the spending side, total personal consumption expenditures (PCE) rose 1.0 percent in August following a 1.5 percent increase in July. Among the components, durable goods rose 0.9 percent while nondurable-goods spending fell 0.1 percent and spending on services increased 1.4 percent for the month.

The price indexes from the report on personal income and spending are the primary measures followed by the Federal Reserve. The total PCE price index increased 0.3 percent in August as durable-goods prices rose 0.9 percent, nondurable-goods prices increased 0.2 percent, and services prices increased 0.3 percent. The PCE price index excluding food and energy rose 0.3 percent for the month.

Over the past year, the PCE price index is up 1.4 percent, versus 1.1 percent in the prior month. The core PCE index, which excludes food and energy prices, is up 1.6 percent from a year ago. That measure has been running at or below 2 percent since 2012.

Economic activity remains extremely distorted following the outbreak of Covid-19 and the implementation of lockdown policies to reduce the

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New US Jobless Claims Fall To 837,000: Government

New jobless claim filings in the United States fell to 837,000 last week seasonally adjusted, the Labor Department said Thursday, resuming their downward trajectory after increasing slightly earlier in the month.

Initial claims fell by 36,000 over the previous week’s level, however the number of people filing under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program for workers who aren’t normally eligible rose by more than 34,000 to 650,120.

The data is also complicated by most-populous state California’s decision to pause processing claims for the two weeks to October 3 to address a backlog, meaning the level it reported Thursday was the same as the previous week and will be revised later.

The drop in initial claims was better than forecast but remains well above the single worst week reported during the 2008-2010 global financial crisis more than six months after business shutdowns to stop the spread of Covid-19 began in the US.

“Filings are stuck at a high level,” Rubeela Farooqi of High Frequency Economics said, adding that the pause in California reporting introduces “volatility” into the data.

New weekly jobless claim filings in the United States are falling week-on-week but indicate continued widespread joblessness New weekly jobless claim filings in the United States are falling week-on-week but indicate continued widespread joblessness Photo: AFP / Olivier DOULIERY

“Layoff announcements are also ongoing. Even as jobs are being recovered, job losses are mounting, indicative of continuing strains in the labor market.”

The insured unemployment rate dropped 0.6 points to 8.1 percent in the week ended September 19, the latest for which data was available.

More than 26.5 million people were receiving benefits in all programs as of September 12, the data said, an increase of nearly 485,000 from the week prior though the data isn’t seasonally adjusted.

The four-week moving average of new claims is decreasing by less than 12,000 per-week, which Ian Shepherdson of Pantheon Macroeconomics said means they are set to reach 665,000 — the level of the worst single week of the global financial crisis — in January.

“The labor market clearly is still in turmoil,” he said.

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