Tag: fatherinlaw

Father-in-law insults bride’s appearance at ‘surprise’ wedding, gets slammed online

A Reddit user was facing criticism last week after seeming to insult his daughter-in-law about how she looked at her “surprise” wedding. 

The angry father-in-law posted about the incident on Reddit’s “Am I the A–h—” forum. 

According to the user, who has since deleted his account, his son and daughter-in-law were married eight months ago but didn’t tell anyone in advance that their ceremony was happening.

Instead, the bride and groom invited everyone to attend a cocktail party, which was eventually where the couple said “I do.” 

The father of the groom explained that his wife unintentionally wore white to the event. In the United States, wedding guests typically tend to avoid wearing white as a means to not distract from the bride. 

WOMAN LOANS DESIGNER WEDDING DRESS TO OTHER BRIDES FOR FREE

According to the Redditor, his wife frequently wears white, so the newlyweds should have known to warn them that it was a wedding. Instead, the bride has reportedly been blaming her mother-in-law for the fashion faux pas.  

A man is being slammed online for insulting his daughter-in-law about her appearance at her "surprise" wedding. (iStock)

A man is being slammed online for insulting his daughter-in-law about her appearance at her “surprise” wedding. (iStock)

“For eight months she has been trying to spin it to make my wife look like some crazed MIL [mother-in-law] who showed up in a wedding dress,” the man wrote. “She had a wedding picture on social media and when someone commented who wore white, she wrote back ‘that’s my mother in law, she doesn’t like me’ and a laughing emoji.”

“My wife called her out on it and she played the victim and whined about my wife trying to upstage her,” the man added. “She has made a couple snide comments, and told people who weren’t at the wedding that it was intentional.”

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Apparently, the groom eventually talked to his dad about the situation, explaining that the bride was hurt after her own mom and best friend commented on how “gorgeous” her mother-in-law looked, before saying anything about the bride herself in the wedding photos, the Redditor said. 

“My wife used to model and not to be an a–, but she draws your eye much more than DIL [daughter-in-law],” the man wrote.

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His son also told him that the bride “is insecure, and she has always felt insecure” around her mother-in-law.

“I don’t really care,” the man wrote. “I have a 15-year-old daughter, so I certainly get that woman struggle with body issues, but you don’t get to take that out on someone else and spread lies.”

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Eventually, the man couldn’t take it anymore after the bride commented that the photo was “proof that she is the innocent one in the relationship.”

“I snapped at her that I am sick of hearing about the white dress, and that maybe if she put more effort into her own appearance she would have been a beautiful

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Seahawks’ Damien Lewis honors Andrew Sledd, his ‘future father-in-law’ and a police-brutality victim

The chef flew in from Chicago the day before the Seahawks’ first home game against the New England Patriots, landing in Seattle around 6 that Saturday night. About 28 hours later, Andrew Sledd completed his latest culinary masterwork: four pounds of Cajun fried chicken, a pot of collard greens, an overflowing pan of macaroni and cheese, Cajun cornbread stuffing and, for desert, peach cobbler.

Sledd and his wife Marie had come to Seattle for the first time at the behest of Seahawks rookie offensive lineman Damien Lewis, who grew accustomed to Sledd’s cooking after his college games the past couple years at LSU. Lewis wanted that tradition to continue in Seattle. The Sledds were happy to oblige — and happy for an excuse to visit their 4-month-old grandson, Damien Lewis Jr., the first child for Savannah Sledd and Damien Lewis.

The family watched on a 70-inch TV as the Seahawks pulled off a last-second victory over New England, then waited for Lewis to get home. Then they feasted.

“Oh, it was nice,” Lewis said of the spread. “We had to do it the South way — ain’t too much soul food around here.”

For the Seahawks’ next game, Lewis came up with a way to show his appreciation for his future father-in-law, “Mr. Sledd,” as Lewis has insisted on calling him. The NFL gave formal approval of the gesture, and there it was on the back of Lewis’ helmet Sunday against the Dallas Cowboys:

ANDREW SLEDD

The NFL has granted players permission to honor victims of police brutality and racial injustice this season. Many Seahawks players, Lewis included, began the season with Breonna Taylor’s name on their helmets. Lewis has a personal connection with someone he wanted to share, and he’s offering a hand — and a helmet — to help spread the message.

Sledd, a Chicago native whose mother is Black and father is white, was a 24-year-old basketball player at St. Xavier College when in 1989 he became a victim of police brutality. He is sharing his story in detail now, for the first time publicly, in hopes of continuing the conversation around racial injustices. He said he feels an obligation to speak for those victims — for Breonna Taylor, for George Floyd, for Jacob Blake and for the many Black victims before him — who cannot speak for themselves.

“I’m one of the lucky ones,” Sledd said.

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The first bullet grazed the top of Sledd’s head. The next one almost killed him.

Officer Elroy Baker was firing his 9 mm gun over his shoulder, blindly shooting as he ran down a flight of 20 stairs. Baker, who was African-American, was one of seven Chicago police officers executing a search warrant at Sledd’s family residence around 10:30 p.m. on March 31, 1989, court records show. The narcotics team was looking for a man who didn’t live there and had no association with Sledd or his family. Officers were not wearing uniforms, they did not announce who they

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