Tag: historical

Mount Prospect Historical Society cancels annual Holiday Housewalk

The Mount Prospect Historical Society board of directors has chosen to cancel its 33rd annual Holiday Housewalk for December 2020 due to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

“We couldn’t imagine homeowners wanting to open their homes to the public under the current conditions, and we also couldn’t foresee many people choosing to tour the homes this year,” said Jean Murphy, Housewalk co-chairman.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“But it will be back. The Housewalk is the society’s largest fundraiser of the year,” Murphy said. “Its proceeds support the many educational endeavors of the society and help to pay for upkeep on our museum campus.”

“We have decided to miniaturize the annual event and offer the ‘2020 Holiday Housewalk: Dollhouse Edition,’ showcasing some of the dollhouses from the Historical Society collection and community in a virtual exhibit,” said Emily Dattilo, museum director. “Stay tuned for more information.”

Those interested can connect on Facebook, www.facebook.com/mphistory, or visit www.mtphist.org, to take a virtual walking tour of local historic homes; find out about scheduled events; purchase a T-shirt or other Mount Prospect-themed items; or make a memorial donation to the society.

“We thank the public for their continued interest in and support of the Mount Prospect Historical Society during this difficult time,” said Deb Rittle, society president.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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Portland protests: Man facing charges after damage to Oregon Historical Society

Malik Fard Muhamad was charged with one count of unlawful possession of a firearm, one count of possession of a loaded firearm in public, one count of criminal mischief in the first degree and one count of riot.

CNN has reached out to Muhamad and his family for a statement.

Activists called for people to march Sunday for an “Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage,” the day before the federally recognized Columbus Day. Police declared the protest a riot after the group of about 300 people vandalized businesses and toppled statues of Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

Law enforcement identified Muhamad as part of a group of people wearing all black and vandalizing buildings, according to a news release from the Multnomah County District Attorney’s office. Muhamad ran from police as they attempted to arrest him, the release said.

During the arrest, police found a pistol behind barrels he was hiding behind that they matched with a loaded pistol magazine in Muhamad’s pocket, the release said.

Detectives say Muhamad has been living in Washington and has attended multiple protests over the past few months in which violence occurred, according to the release.

“It is sickening to me to see the destruction that occurred in Portland overnight,” said District Attorney Mike Schmidt.

A woman pulls a quilt from the display case inside the Oregon Historical Society during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest.

Conflict over racism and inequality

The damage done to the Oregon Historical Society is “inexcusable,” Schmidt said.

“They have put a spotlight on white supremacy, racism, civil rights and social inequality. They have elevated the voices and stories of marginalized and underserved communities in Oregon,” he said.

Schmidt said his office is committed to prosecuting crimes connected to protest violence.

Multiple arrests have already been made in connection to Sunday’s demonstrations, including a person armed with a loaded pistol who broke numerous windows, and the driver involved in pulling down the Roosevelt statue, according to Portland Police Chief Chuck Lovell.

CNN has reached out to the apparent organizers in Portland for comment but has not yet received a response.

In addition to being pulled down, both Lincoln and Roosevelt’s statues had references to violence committed against indigenous people spray painted on them.

Roosevelt’s statue had “stolen lands” written on it. He has drawn criticism for his forced removal of indigenous persons, which he used to make his conservation efforts possible.

Photos show the statue of Lincoln with “Dakota 38,” a reference to the Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising. Lincoln ordered the hanging of 38 Dakota natives in Mankato, Minnesota — the largest mass execution in the US.

Then-Minnesota Gov. Alexander Ramsey originally ordered more than 300 men sentenced to hanging but Lincoln reduced the number.

Lovell said protesters broke several windows of the Historical Society pavilion, tossing at least three lit flares inside. The flares extinguished themselves and did not do any serious damage.

Kerry Tymchuk, the historical society’s executive director, said an African American quilt made by 15 African American women ahead of the US bicentennial, “a priceless piece of history here,” was stolen

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Man facing charges after damage to Oregon Historical Society

An Indiana man has been charged after allegedly using a metal baton to smash out windows at the Oregon Historical Society and Portland State University during protests throughout the city on Sunday.



A woman pulls a quilt from the display case inside the Oregon Historical Society during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest.


© Nathan Howard/Getty Images
A woman pulls a quilt from the display case inside the Oregon Historical Society during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest.

Malik Fard Muhamad was charged with one count of unlawful possession of a firearm, one count of possession of a loaded firearm in public, one count of criminal mischief in the first degree and one count of riot.

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CNN has reached out to Muhamad and his family for a statement.

Activists called for people to march Sunday for an “Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage,” the day before the federally recognized Columbus Day. Police declared the protest a riot after the group of about 300 people vandalized businesses and toppled statues of Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

Law enforcement identified Muhamad as part of a group of people wearing all black and vandalizing buildings, according to a news release from the Multnomah County District Attorney’s office. Muhamad ran from police as they attempted to arrest him, the release said.

During the arrest, police found a pistol behind barrels he was hiding behind that they matched with a loaded pistol magazine in Muhamad’s pocket, the release said.

Detectives say Muhamad has been living in Washington and has attended multiple protests over the past few months in which violence occurred, according to the release.

“It is sickening to me to see the destruction that occurred in Portland overnight,” said District Attorney Mike Schmidt.

Conflict over racism and inequality

The damage done to the Oregon Historical Society is “inexcusable,” Schmidt said.

“They have put a spotlight on white supremacy, racism, civil rights and social inequality. They have elevated the voices and stories of marginalized and underserved communities in Oregon,” he said.

Schmidt said his office is committed to prosecuting crimes connected to protest violence.

Multiple arrests have already been made in connection to Sunday’s demonstrations, including a person armed with a loaded pistol who broke numerous windows, and the driver involved in pulling down the Roosevelt statue, according to Portland Police Chief Chuck Lovell.

CNN has reached out to the apparent organizers in Portland for comment but has not yet received a response.

In addition to being pulled down, both Lincoln and Roosevelt’s statues had references to violence committed against indigenous people spray painted on them.

Roosevelt’s statue had “stolen lands” written on it. He has drawn criticism for his forced removal of indigenous persons, which he used to make his conservation efforts possible.

Photos show the statue of Lincoln with “Dakota 38,” a reference to the Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising. Lincoln ordered the hanging of 38 Dakota natives in Mankato, Minnesota — the largest mass execution in the US.

Then-Minnesota Gov. Alexander Ramsey originally ordered more than 300 men sentenced to hanging but Lincoln reduced the number.

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Famous quilt celebrating Black history stolen, found and returned to the Oregon Historical Society

A famous quilt made in the 1970s to teach Black history and shown around the country during the 1976 United States Bicentennial celebration was stolen from the lobby of the Oregon Historical Society in Portland Sunday.

Police recovered the priceless quilt a few blocks from the museum, said museum executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. The theft occurred amid violent protests Sunday night in downtown Portland, several prominent statues were toppled and nearly a dozen windows were broken at the society’s pavilion lobby.

Tymchuk said the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Quilt is in one piece, but it was left out in the rain and some of the fabric colors have run.

The museum’s curatorial staff is drying it out, removing leaves and other debris, and mitigating the damage.

Vandalism to the museum building is estimated to cost about $25,000.

The historic quilt is no longer being displayed, but an online panel discussion scheduled on Thursday to discuss the quilt’s significance will be held. One of the speakers was to be the only surviving member of the quilting group, Sylvia Gates Carlisle.

The quilt was the idea of Carlisle’s mother, Jeanette Gates, an advocate for Black history to be taught in schools. Gates saw the Oregon quilt made for the Bicentennial and invited 14 other Black women in Portland to create squares for a quilt representing Black culture.

Each of the 30 blocks that form the king-size quilt depict a significant event, person or group in America’s Black history, starting in 1492 with Black Spanish explorer Pedro Alonso Niño piloting the Santa Maria in Columbus’s expedition to America, to the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

“Mrs. Gates was determined that the Bicentennial exhibit include African-American heritage,” says quilt historian Mary Bywater Cross. “This sophisticated story quilt reflects 500 years of Black history not seen in textbooks.”

Cross sees a direct link between Portland’s Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Quilt made 44 years ago and recent storied quilts that address gun violence, racial injustice and the Black Lives Matter movement, such as the exhibit “Gone but Never Forgotten: Remembering Those Lost to Police Brutality” at the Textile Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

On Oct. 15, textile consultant Sheridan Collins will lead an online discussion about Portland’s quilt with historian Carmen Thompson and Cross.

The free event, conducted over Zoom from noon to 1 p.m., is part of Portland Textile Month, a series of events in October organized by Caleb Sayan of Portland’s Textile Hive.

Sayan said he has a sense of guilt requesting that the Oregon Historical Society display the quilt in the lobby for the month.

“It’s not the worse-case scenario, but it’s troubling to have something damaged,” said Sayan.

The quilt, an applique style that uses stitchery, is part of the permanent collection at the Oregon Historical Society.

“Quilts are visual records that tell stories,” says Cross. “Mrs. Gates wrote that she wanted the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Quilt to focus on the issues that unite African-Americans: Religious heritage, struggle against oppression and the strength

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After vandals target Oregon Historical Society, director vows, ‘Our mission will be undeterred’

Amid violent protests Sunday night in downtown Portland, several prominent statues were toppled, windows at Portland State University were smashed and police said gunshots were fired into an empty restaurant.

But the vandalism that seemed to gather the most ire from city and state officials occurred at the Oregon Historical Society, a bastion of diverse artifacts and exhibits on the 1200 block of Southwest Park Avenue.

Nearly a dozen windows in the institution’s pavilion were smashed, said Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. Flares were tossed into the lobby, and a priceless quilt was taken. Preliminary estimates to repair the damage were about $25,000, Tymchuk told The Oregonian/OregonLive, though costs could end up higher.

The vandalism occurred during a protest organizers billed as an “Indigenous Day of Rage.” The action was eventually declared a riot, and three people were arrested.

Tymchuk was troubled that the society was targeted, especially given the institution’s recent efforts to tell a full and complete version of Oregon’s history, which is replete with ugly instances of white supremacy.

“We have been doing so much in leading the conversation, the uncomfortable conversation, on Oregon’s past and telling the unvarnished truth through our programming, exhibits, lectures and publications,” Tymchuk said.

Late last year, the society devoted an entire issue of its quarterly publication to Oregon’s unseemly history of racism. Earlier this year, the institution unveiled a permanent exhibit, meant to be the cornerstone of the museum, called “Experience Oregon.” Tymchuk said curators worked diligently with Oregon’s nine federally recognized tribes “to make sure we were telling their story correctly and accurately.”

The quilt taken from the society’s lobby was a bicentennial heritage quilt, stitched by 15 African American women in the mid-1970s. The artifact had traveled the nation before going on display in Portland.

It was the society’s commitment to featuring exhibits that showed the diversity in Oregon’s history that made the vandalism so hard to fathom, said Rep. Tawna Sanchez, a descendent of the Shoshone-Bannock, Ute and Carrizo tribes who represents parts of North and Northeast Portland.

“The fact that someone would hijack Indigenous People’s Day to commit more violence is not appropriate,” she said at a Monday morning news conference. “The destruction of the Oregon Historical Society in any way, shape or form is unconscionable because that place is so amazingly part of the actual truth of our state.”

Amid the shattered glass and singed carpet were elements of hope, though. The windows could be repaired and none of the exhibits were damaged. Tymchuk said police recovered the stolen quilt a few blocks from the museum, wet but mostly undamaged.

Tymchuk has been inundated with texts and emails of support as news of the vandalism has spread, but when he arrived at the society Monday morning, he found a handwritten note on a napkin, wrapped around a single dollar bill.

“Hello,” the note began. “I’m homeless so I dont have much to give to you, just some of my bottle collecting money, but I saw your windows

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Brunswick Area Historical Society fundraiser is anything but ‘old school’

BRUNSWICK, Ohio — As the summer harvest began to wane at the Brunswick Farmers Market, some new ideas cropped up to help the nonprofit Brunswick Area Historical Society in its efforts to raise funds for its nearly completed “old school” building.

With large-crowd fundraisers stymied by COVID-19, and even many of the usual summer activities curtailed this year, fundraising was painfully slow.

That’s when a new vendor at the markets this year, Stacey Asvestas, stepped in to see if she could help.

Once she heard that the historical society needed to raise money for the building that will house 200 years of Brunswick school artifacts, she jumped into action.

Actually, she skated into action.

Asvestas roller-skated around Heritage Farm from her vendor’s spot this summer, so she skated to each of the vendors at the market and asked if they would contribute to an auction. Because the market season was almost over, she suggested an online auction.

Then, she worked with Ken Chamers, the historical society’s internet guru, to start the auction of items donated by the many vendors and other members of the community.

The first one-week auction started on Monday, Oct. 5 — the day following the last farmers market. The hope is to take the auctions through to the Christmas shopping season — and maybe beyond, she said.

Although Asvestas is new to the farmers market, she is no stranger to the area; she grew up in Valley City and is a Buckeye High School graduate. She is the mother of three and has two grandchildren.

While her children were young, she bought and sold classic cars. She also worked part-time at Miss Molly’s Tea Room in Medina for 15 years. She then formed a 501c(3) nonprofit organization.

“It’s a musical ministry — helping at-risk young people gain self-esteem through performance,” she said.

Her group, Stage 1 Music Campus, has provided entertainment for a number of area events, with Asvestas getting rave reviews for her enthusiasm and organizational prowess.

She has lived in Brunswick for eight years and, as a person with lots of allergies, she discovered and sells ZA Charcoal Slurry detox for people and animals, and also has crafts and other items. She can be reached at Stage1star@gmail.com.

As items are donated for the online auctions, she packages them, photographs them and sends descriptions to Chamers, who lists them on the charity auction site. He set up the bidding process, and there is a way either to pay online or when the items are picked up. Once someone wins, they can arrange to pick up their items at the farm.

Chamers has been a Brunswick resident for 20 years, having grown up in Parma Heights. He is a graduate of Parma High School and, while in college, he worked at a computer store at the beginning of the home computing era.

“I was really interested and started programming,” he said, “and I soon got a programming job and just kept going.”

Currently, he works for

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Weston Historical Society To Host Jack O’Lantern Stroll

Press release from Weston Historical Society:

Oct. 11, 2020

Bring the family to the historic Coley Homestead, 104 Weston Road, on Sunday, October 25, when the Weston Historical Society presents its first-ever “Jack O’Lantern Stroll,” from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Halloween jack o’lanterns will light up the historic Coley Homestead. Stroll the Coley Homestead as you view hand-carved jack o’lanterns and vote for your favorites. Then, take a chance at winning one. Learn about harvest time on a farm in the Coley Barn. Your ticket order includes 10 pumpkin tokens to use to win one of the carved pumpkins! Winners will pick up their pumpkins the following day.

Masks must be worn during the event. “We also ask that you practice social distancing while at the event,” said Samantha Kulish, executive director. “This is to keep you and others safe. Thank you for your cooperation.”

The Weston Historical Society’s Coley Homestead is located at 104 Weston Road. Parking and the event entrance are located on High Acre Road. Turn onto High Acre Road from Weston Road, then make a right into our parking lot.

In the event of severe inclement weather, the Jack O’Lantern Stroll will be rescheduled for Sunday, November 1. Tickets will be honored.

The Weston Historical Society would like to thank its annual sponsors: Fairfield County Bank and KMS Partners at Compass. The Weston Historical Society is 501(c)3 non-profit organization and is generously supported by people like you. For more information and to donate, please contact the Weston Historical Society at info@westonhistoricalsociety.org, 203-226-1804 or visit www.westonhistoricalsociety.org.


This press release was produced by Weston Historical Society. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

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LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locks up Michigan City jail door | Entertainment



LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locks up Michigan City jail door

LaPorte County Commissioner Richard Mrozinski, Museum Director Keri Teller Jakubowski and LaPorte County Historical Society Board President Bruce Johnson pose with the historic Michigan City jail door that was acquired by the LaPorte County Historical Society Museum.




The LaPorte County Historical Society Museum locked up its latest acquisition: the historic jail door from the Michigan City Superior Courthouse.

The museum, at 2405 Indiana Ave., LaPorte, obtained the door to the jail cell from the 111-year-old courthouse at 300 Washington St. where prisoners were held during their daily trial proceedings. It’s actually two doors: a barred door and a steel door with a peep hole that allowed sound and light to enter the holding cell.

“LaPorte County Commissioner Richard Mrozinski was instrumental in acquiring the door on behalf of the Museum,” the LaPorte County Historical Society said in a press release.

“The jail door was in an area of the courthouse that is currently undergoing renovation. The physical transfer of the door was accomplished by Marquiss Electric, Inc. of Michigan City.”

The museum also has a jail door from the third LaPorte County Jail, which was built in 1857 next to the defunct Shafer’s Laundry that was torn down to make room for the LaPorte County Complex. Both doors are similar in design and date back to the same period between the late 1800s and the early 1990s.

“Both are intriguing complements to the police and fire department exhibits,” the LaPorte County Historical Society said in a press release.

The museum is now open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and requires visitors to wear masks during the pandemic.

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Schaumburg Twp. Historical Society’s Historic Bus Tour makes virtual stop

The third annual Historic Bus Tour, sponsored by the Schaumburg Township Historical Society, went virtual in September.

“Did You Know?” is a video collection of seven important sites that features architectural and historic treasures in Schaumburg Township.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

View highlights of the Schweikher House and Studio, Sunderlage House, Merkle Cabin, Volkening Heritage Farm, Old St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Schaumburg Center Schoolhouse, and Heritage Park.

This entertaining and educational tour includes a midcentury modern home, similar to Frank Lloyd Wright-style, listed on the National Registry of Historic Places, plus a two-story historic home, schoolhouse, log cabin, an authentic farmhouse kitchen and more. Discover a new park that celebrates the past.

Go to www.schaumburgtownship.org to start the virtual tour.

For information about the Schaumburg Township Historical Society, and to find an additional Schaumburg Township Illinois Bicentennial self-guided tour and map, visit www.s-t-h-s.org.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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Manitowoc Historical Society plans fall stroll for mid-October, plus more local news

Waldo Boulevard opens to traffic after ceremony

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Manitowoc County Historical Society to host Fall Stroll in mid-October



a tree in front of a house: Manitowoc County's Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.


© Courtesy of Manitowoc County Historical Society
Manitowoc County’s Pinecrest Historical Village, shown here in fall.

Manitowoc County Historical Society, 924 Pinecrest Road in Manitowoc, is offering a fall site stroll for guests to enjoy the natural beauty of the historic Pinecrest Village from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 16-17.

The village is open for strolling amid the coronavirus pandemic, but all historic buildings are closed to the public. The McAllister House Welcome Center will be open for restrooms and the Museum Store. When people are indoors, masks are required. Restrooms are also available on the back of the General Store/Meat Market.

Pick-up will also be held during these times for those who have reserved an All Hallow’s Eve STEAM Pack. Packs will be available for pick-up on the McAllister House Welcome Center front porch.

Also available for pick-up on the porch will be an outdoor history scavenger hunt. Identify items throughout the historical village and in the windows of the historic structures.

There is no admission charge for the fall site stroll. As a non-profit organization, the museum said it “would greatly appreciate your donation to assist in supporting our Manitowoc County Historical Society during this time. A donation box will be available on the porch of the McAllister House Welcome Center.”

Besides the two-day fall site stroll, the Historical Society grounds and buildings are closed for the year. Local history information is always available on the museum’s website at ManitowocCountyHistory.org and its social media channels. 

‘InfoFun Day’ set for Oct. 17 at Lighthouse Inn

The Manitowoc County “That’s Enough Already” (TEA) movement said in a news release that it will host an “InfoFun Day” on Oct. 17 at the Lighthouse Inn, 1515 Memorial Drive, Two Rivers. It said doors will open at 1 p.m. with activities starting at 2 p.m.

Activities include a “Best Dressed Patriot” contest and a trivia contest. For the trivia contest, teams will consist of four people with registration ending at 1:45 p.m. on the day of the event. To pre-register, call 920-732-3200 or email with subject line “TEA — Contest Entry” to pattyk2049@gmail.com with team name and list of members.

The group said “several speakers have been secured and we are looking for appropriate vendors. Other activities available are Jenga or play a hand of sheepshead.”

For more information, call 920-732-3200 or email pattyk2049@gmail.com.

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