Tag: Medical

Harvard Medical School Renames Academic Society After First Black Tenured Professor


Harvard Medical School Dean George Q. Daley has approved renaming the school’s Holmes Society in honor of physician-scientist William Augustus Hinton, the first Black tenured professor at Harvard, The Harvard Crimson reported.

Two medical students had started a petition to rename the Holmes Society earlier in 2020, accruing more than 1,000 signatures.

A task force of students and faculty chose Hinton as the new namesake.

“The quality that stood out about Professor Hinton, that I think really moved us towards his selection, was that he openly admitted his humanity,” Advisory Dean and Director of the Hinton Society Anthony V. D’Amico said. “There are times when people fail, and we saw one of his qualities is that he would fall in terms of his research or clinical practice, or in terms of his science, and he wouldn’t give up. And I think that that kind of tenacity and fortitude, courage, that students want to be reminded of.”

The Holmes Society – one of five academic societies at the school – was named after Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., former dean of Harvard Medical School.

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Harvard Medical Society Renamed in Honor of First Black Tenured Professor, Physician-Scientist Hinton | News

Harvard Medical School Dean George Q. Daley approved renaming the school’s Holmes Society in honor of physician-scientist William Augustus Hinton, Class of 1905, the first Black tenured professor at Harvard.

HMS and Harvard School of Dental Medicine students are assigned to one of five academic societies upon entering the schools. Until now, the Holmes Society bore the name of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Class of 1829, a writer, physician, and former Dean of Harvard Medical School.

Holmes was one of the first American intellectuals to promote the racist doctrine of eugenics. In 1850, he revoked the acceptances of the Medical School’s first three Black students, writing that the “intermixing of the white and black races in their lecture rooms is distasteful to a large portion of the class and injurious to the interests of the school.”

Hinton — a 1905 graduate of the College and later HMS — specialized in the fields of bacteriology and immunology. He created a new diagnostic blood test for syphilis, one the U.S. Public Health Service later adopted.

Earlier this year, two medical students launched a petition to rename the former Holmes Society due to Holmes’s support of eugenics and racism towards Black and Indigenous people. The petition garnered over 1000 signatures from HMS and HSDM faculty, administrators, students, and alumni.

A Faculty Council Subcommittee on Artwork and Cultural Representations task force composed of students and faculty drafted a set of qualities they hoped the society’s new namesake would embody. The task force members then identified individuals who might best match those ideals, which led to Hinton’s selection.

“The quality that stood out about Professor Hinton, that I think really moved us towards his selection, was that he openly admitted his humanity,” Advisory Dean and Director of the Hinton Society Anthony V. D’Amico said. “There are times when people fail, and we saw one of his qualities is that he would fall in terms of his research or clinical practice, or in terms of his science, and he wouldn’t give up. And I think that that kind of tenacity and fortitude, courage, that students want to be reminded of.”

LaShyra T. Nolen, the author of the petition and Class of 2023 HMS student council president, said while the renaming of the academic society does not constitute an end to the conversation surrounding anti-racism at Harvard, this change makes clear that racist symbols or figures “are no longer going to be part of our DNA.”

Jalen A. Benson, the creator of the petition and a member of the Hinton Society, said as a Black student he finds it “so powerful to see that excellence will be rewarded, excellence will be recognized,” even if not during Hinton’s lifetime.

“Hinton wasn’t allowed to be a surgeon as he wanted to be, they wouldn’t take him on at Mass General,” Benson said. “So to see Harvard recognize contributions from people of color, especially Black people, means so much to me, because I can look and say I’m proud to

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Michigan State Medical Society | Farmington, MI Patch

EAST LANSINGThe following is a public statement from S. Bobby Mukkamala, MD, president of the Michigan State Medical Society, which represents more than 15,000 physicians and physicians-in-training, in support of preventive measures to control the spread of COVID-19.

“As coronavirus hospitalizations and new cases are rising, the Michigan State Medical Society (MSMS) encourages Michigan residents to diligently wear masks in public, wash your hands, and practice social distancing. When practiced consistently, these simple strategies are effective tools in containing the spread of the disease.

Early on, Michiganders rose to the challenge of ‘bending the curve,’ but the threat of this virus is not over. As of October 5, 2020, Michigan reported nearly 129,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and more than 6,800 deaths, and recent data show a seven-day average of 884 new cases, the highest since April 29.

If we are to continue to make progress, support our communities, and not negate the many efforts and sacrifices made by our health care workforce, businesses, and citizens, we must use the COVID-19 toolbox – masks (or other appropriate face coverings), hand washing, and social distancing. These precautionary measures help reduce virus transmission, particularly by individuals who are sick or who have been infected but are not showing any symptoms. The medical benefits are clear and remain in our own control.”

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New Brunswick Medical Society warns of health-care gaps after Clinic 554 closes

New Brunswick’s only clinic offering abortions outside of hospitals and family care practice Clinic 554 has closed its doors to most of its patients. The New Brunswick Medical Society now says this loss will create a gap in health-care services.



a sign on the side of a building: Clinic 554 in Fredericton, N.B., is shown on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. The only medical clinic offering abortions in New Brunswick announced its impending closure last week, blaming a provincial policy that refuses to fund surgical abortions outside a hospital. Advocates say rural Canadians across the country face barriers accessing abortions but a small number of clinics and strained healthcare systems make the issue especially pronounced in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett


© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett
Clinic 554 in Fredericton, N.B., is shown on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. The only medical clinic offering abortions in New Brunswick announced its impending closure last week, blaming a provincial policy that refuses to fund surgical abortions outside a hospital. Advocates say rural Canadians across the country face barriers accessing abortions but a small number of clinics and strained healthcare systems make the issue especially pronounced in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Bissett

The clinic ended most care on Sept. 30, but some publicly-funded services are still offered to a few vulnerable patients with complex care.

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“I am still seeing some people,” said Clinic 554 owner Dr. Adrian Edgar.

While he hopes to expand his practice again, Edgar says New Brunswick’s new Health Minister Dorothy Shephard has yet to return his calls.

Re-opening “would save the health-care system time, space, money,” Edgar told Global News on Saturday.

Read more: Security removes tents from protesters during vigil for Clinic 554 at N.B. legislature

With the closure of Clinic 554, New Brunswickers lost more than just an abortion clinic.

“The province of New Brunswick has well over 35,000 orphan patients right now who are looking for family doctors and certainly the closure of Clinic 554 is going to add to that list,” Dr. said Chris Goodyear, the new N.B. Medical Society president.

The practice also provided transgender health care and prided itself in being LGBTQ2I+ friendly.

But it constantly faced financial ruin due to lack of funding from the provincial government.

In New Brunswick, abortions are only offered in three locations: two hospitals in Moncton and one hospital in Bathurst, as previous N.B. governments have not repealed a regulation banning the funding of abortions outside of hospitals.

Higgs has also received criticism from the federal government on the Canada Health Act.

Ottawa had actually reduced the Canada Health Transfer to New Brunswick by $140,216, as a result of patient charges for abortion services provided outside of hospitals in 2017.

“I think it’s very clear that there is an obstruction of health-care services in New Brunswick,” Edgar said.

Goodyear says losing the clinic will create a gap in health-care services, and that the Medical Society is still advocating for preservation of the clinic.

“Certainly the closure of the clinic does not mean that our efforts are going to be halted, at all,” said Goodyear.

“We would invite the Premier to sit down with the concerned doctors, the Medical Society and RHAs to have this discussion,” he said.

Read more: 36 senators sign letter in support of Clinic 554

Earlier this week, 36 senators from across Canada released a statement in support of Clinic 554, and Edgar said two out-of-province physicians reached out to him with offers

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Mary Callery O’Brien honored with Massachusetts Medical Society Grant V. Rodkey Award

Mary Callery O’Brien, MD

Mary Callery O’Brien, MD, assistant professor of medicine, has been honored by the Massachusetts Medical Society with the 2020 Grant V. Rodkey Award. The beloved teacher was elected by student members of the medical society to receive the award which recognizes a Massachusetts physician for outstanding contributions to medical education and medical students.

“Dr. O’Brien provides me with great feedback that allows me to improve my skills and challenges me to advance my knowledge,” said Nora Feeney, SOM ’21  “I am so grateful that she always makes herself available to answer my questions and takes the time to teach concepts I’ve struggled with in new ways.” 

Dr. O’Brien invited Feeney to join her in teaching a clinical skills session for first-year medical students regarding sexual health history, a further demonstration of O’Brien’s dedication to medical education.

On faculty at UMMS for 23 years, she has been extensively involved in curriculum development and directed School of Medicine courses, most recently, the multidisciplinary Building Working Cells and Tissues course which brings together basic scientists and clinicians to illustrate the “bench to bedside” model of disease pathophysiology.

“Dr. O’Brien is venerated by medical students as a gifted teacher they ‘know and love from day one,’” wrote nominator Michele Pugnaire, MD, professor emeritus of medicine and former senior associate dean for educational affairs. “She is the consummate clinician-educator dedicated to student teaching and exemplifying the values, knowledge and skills of the expert teacher and accomplished primary care physician, fully deserving of the Rodkey Award.”

O’Brien stresses the importance of lifelong learning to all learners, serving as the chair of the Education Committee of the Worcester District Medical Society. In 2015, she received the Lamar Souter Excellence in Undergraduate Medical Education Award, UMass Medical School’s most prestigious award for educators.

A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross and the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, O’Brien completed internal medicine residency at UMMS before joining the faculty. She practices internal medicine in Shrewsbury.

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