Tag: order

Unrest in Avon? Trump’s message of law and order, loaded with racist undertones, takes aim at safety and security in Connecticut suburbs

In the eyes of President Donald Trump and some Republicans, electing the Democrats in 2020 would lead to a clear and frightening outcome: tranquil suburbs in Connecticut and elsewhere would be overrun by crime, violent protests, and social decay.

It’s an old message with a new twist, fueled by the backlash against Black Lives Matter protests and demonstrations this summer that were largely peaceful in Connecticut, but turned violent in Portland, Chicago, Los Angeles and other cities.

Referring to the prospect of civil unrest, David X. Sullivan, a Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District, told the Courant that he is “concerned about Avon, Farmington and Simsbury becoming as violent as Portland, New York and Chicago.”

Unrest in Avon?

Trump’s law and order message and its many versions may sound far-fetched to some. But there is a racist undertone to the rhetoric that has proven effective in the past, said Noel A. Cazenave, a professor of sociology at UConn. It reflects a long history of American politicians attempting to secure votes by playing up racial fears.

A Trump campaign video from July conjures up a world of defenseless suburbs under attack, showing a fictionalized scene of an elderly white woman watching a news segment about the defunding of the police as a shadowy intruder breaks into her house. She calls 9-1-1 but there is no dispatcher to pick up. The ad flashes a message: “You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.”

Sullivan said he rejects any implication that there is a racial element to his campaign messaging, which he described as an effort to “promote safety, in our homes, in our workplaces.”

But Cazenave notes that fear-mongering in political campaigns has deep roots in America, from Richard Nixon’s “Law and Order” campaign in the late 1960s to George H. W. Bush’s late 1980s political ad centered on Willie Horton, a Black man incarcerated in Massachusetts who raped a white woman while released on furlough, meant to demonstrate his Democratic opponent’s weak stance on crime. Trump is exploiting those same themes this year, Cazenave said.

“Donald Trump’s appeal to European-American suburban women voters is intended to exploit fear that if Joe Biden is elected, low-income African Americans and African American protestors will invade their suburbs,” Cazenave said. He noted that the tactic is “an extension of the old racist trope of imperiled white women.”

Message resonating?

Many Trump supporters in the state say they find comfort in Trump’s promise of safety and were angered to see Connecticut law enforcement come under attack during Black Lives Matter protests this summer and through the recent police accountability bill signed by Gov. Ned Lamont.

In a Biden White House, Trump supporters say they fear the dismantling of constitutional liberties and a lax approach to public safety.

“We haven’t seen the Democrats come out and really put a squash on the increase in crime or the rioting out West and even though we haven’t seen it here, there is that fear that

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How Trump lost the law and order debate

For months, in the midst of protests against racial injustice and a worsening global pandemic, President Trump has sought to portray his Democratic rivals as lawless rioters bent on mob rule.



a group of people standing around a fire: On The Trail: How Trump lost the law and order debate


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On The Trail: How Trump lost the law and order debate

His presidency, Trump has insisted, is the only thing standing between a wave of crime and chaos. Speakers at the Republican National Convention this year – including a St. Louis couple who was charged last week with felony counts after they waved weapons at protesters – repeatedly invoked the threat of violence looming over American cities.

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But Americans think otherwise. In poll after poll, a plurality – and in many cases a majority – say Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden would be better equipped than Trump to handle law and order or crime and violence.

A CNN survey released last week asked respondents which presidential candidate would be better at handling crime and safety issues. Fifty-five percent chose Biden, while 43 percent chose Trump.

Pollsters for NBC and The Wall Street Journal asked who would be better at dealing with crime and violence. Biden led again, 45 percent to 41 percent. Meanwhile, 52 percent told Monmouth pollsters they were very or somewhat confident Biden could maintain law and order if he were elected; 48 percent said the same of Trump.

In a Pew poll released this week, 49 percent of respondents said they were very or somewhat confident Biden could effectively handle law enforcement and criminal justice issues; 44 percent were confident in Trump’s ability to do so.

But perhaps most damningly, 58 percent of Americans surveyed by Fox News said they thought the way Trump talks about racial inequality and the police was actually leading to an increase in acts of violence. Just 38 percent said the same of the former vice president.

Biden, in short, is beating Trump on one of the key issues on which Trump wanted to base his reelection campaign.

Both Democratic and Republican strategists said Trump’s failure to use protests that turned violent in cities like Seattle and Portland against Biden illustrates the most significant challenge Trump now faces: Unlike four years ago, Trump is not the outsider coming to disrupt the system. He is the incumbent, presiding over a deeply divided country.

“Sometimes, reality wins. It’s hard for President Trump to argue that lawless Democrats are responsible for a surge of violence that has occurred during his administration,” said Michael Steel, a Republican strategist who was the top spokesman for former Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio).

Trump has been obsessed with law and order since the 1980s, when he paid for an advertisement calling for the death penalty for the Central Park Five, five Black and Hispanic teenagers who were wrongly convicted of rape. He used his inaugural address in 2017 to call for an end of “American carnage,” even though statistics released by the FBI show crime rates have steadily declined for decades.

Today, law and

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In a state known for ‘law and order,’ Texas Republicans struggle to make the message stick

But there are signs the message has fallen flat, even with some suburban Republican voters who say the efforts to mirror President Trump’s demonization of “Democratic-run cities” and social justice demonstrations needlessly stoke fear and exacerbate political divisiveness.

In the longtime Republican stronghold of Collin County, home to two of the nation’s most competitive state legislative contests, Republican candidates and supporters have spotlighted rising crime rates in neighboring Dallas, where homicides are hovering near a 10-year high. But lifelong Republican Jim Murry said he shakes his head — or shouts at his television screen — when he hears Abbott or Trump rail against “violent” protesters or accuse Democrats of wanting to decimate local police forces.

“To me, it’s all unfounded fear,” said Murry, 64, as he stood among his neighbors’ spacious homes and manicured lawns in west Plano, a Dallas suburb. The idea that Democrats “are going to ruin the suburbs is just ridiculous. Crime is not really an issue here.”

But in many parts of Plano, one of the epicenters of the statehouse fight, Trump lawn signs still outnumber those supporting Biden, especially in the most affluent neighborhoods, and some residents say Democrats are too soft on crime. One resident said several of his neighbors bought guns after racial justice protests erupted this summer. Another blamed Democratic leaders in Dallas for his 26-year-old son’s desire to move back to Plano because he no longer feels safe in the city.

Private GOP polling shows a vast majority of suburban Texas voters reject “defunding the police,” said Austin Chambers, president of the Republican State Leadership Committee — a message the GOP has successfully tied to Democratic candidates in some voters’ minds, even over those Democrats’ objections.

“If they go along these lines and defund the police, we will go back to the days of vigilantes, where we all wear sidearms,” said Plano resident Jack Lusk, 77, a longtime Republican voter and retired pharmacist.

But the GOP’s law-and-order message also has butted up against changing demographics and priorities in the suburbs as Democrats target more than a dozen state House districts, many just outside of Houston or Dallas. The state has been a top priority for both parties in the nationwide battle for statehouses: The GOP controls 29 state legislatures and Democrats hope to flip more than a half-dozen chambers, including in Minnesota, Arizona and Pennsylvania, next month.

The two competitive statehouse races in Collin County are getting a boost from celebrities like Oprah Winfrey and Willie Nelson, who have latched onto a phone-bank campaign organized by Beto O’Rourke.

Since Democrats made major inroads in the Texas suburbs in 2018, Abbott has been attempting to halt their momentum by touting GOP support for law enforcement. He has railed against Democratic leaders in Austin, the state capital, who voted to divert $150 million from policing to housing, social service and health-care initiatives.

Abbott responded by proposing legislation that would cut off funding and limit the powers of Texas cities that reduce police department

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Trump Was ‘Pandering’ to Black and Latinx Voters in ‘Law and Order’ Protest: Fox Host Arthel Neville

President Donald Trump was “pandering” to Black and Latinx Americans during his White House speech on Saturday in a bid to get their votes just weeks before the election, Fox News anchor Arthel Neville told viewers.

The president stood on a balcony to address several hundred supporters gathered on the South Lawn on Saturday afternoon in his first in-person event since he revealed he had tested positive for coronavirus.

The rally was organized by Black conservative commentator Candace Owens and former Arizona police officer Brandon Tatum’s Blexit Foundation.

Touted by the White House as a “peaceful protest for law and order,” Trump told the crowd: “You just marched to the White House because you understand, to protect the lives of Black Americans and all Americans, you have to have your police support you.”

He also claimed Joe Biden, his Democratic rival in November’s election, had “betrayed” Black and Hispanic Americans during his time in office and that his “law and order” campaign is necessary to help them feel safe.

Analyzing the event on Fox, Neville noted that at 18 minutes, the speech was “really short” for the president.

She added: “The president was pandering to the Black and Latinx Americans, garnering… or wishing to garner their support this election. And he also made sure to say that he is pro-jobs, pro-workers, pro-law and order.”

A new Pew Research Center poll found Trump is trailing Biden by wide margins among Black, Hispanic and Asian voters. Biden leads Black voters by 81 percentage points, Hispanic voters by 34 points and Asian voters by 53 points, according to the results of the survey, released on Friday.

Neville also noted that there were around 500 people at the event, citing reporters on the ground, far fewer than the 2,000 guests that were reportedly invited.

Fox host Eric Shawn gave credit to the president for not coughing during the speech. “Look, most importantly he looks fine. He sounded good. He seemed in good spirits and good humor and he didn’t cough,” he noted.

“Does that image of looking like his normal self go a long way in this campaign?” Shawn asked the network’s guests.

Brad Blakeman, who was an advisor to former President George W. Bush, replied: “You bet it does. And it also shows that the president is leading by example.”

Blakeman claimed Trump’ case showed the “survivability of the virus” shouldn’t prevent people from living their lives.

“To think that we’re going to shut down our country, shut down our lives. The president is right. The cure is worse than the disease if we allow ourselves not to be able to live life,” he added.

But at this point, Shawn called Trump “a coronavirus president” and noted that the public did not know the results of the president’s latest test. In a memo released on Saturday night by the White House, Dr. Sean Conley said Trump was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, but did not say explicitly whether he had

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Trump returns to public events with ‘law and order’ speech at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a swift and full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump returned to public events on Saturday with a brief “law and order” speech from a White House balcony.



a man standing next to a clock: Photograph: REX/Shutterstock


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Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

In a closely-watched first public appearance at a live event just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay, the president delivered an 18-minute scripted address to a crowd on the South Lawn. It had been billed as “2,000 invited guests” but in reality a gathering of about 500 mostly young flag-waving supporters, some of whom appeared to be not properly wearing masks.



Donald Trump standing in front of a building: Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.


© Photograph: REX/Shutterstock
Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Trump was maskless during the speech, during which he appeared to show no lingering signs of coronavirus. But questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when he last tested negative for coronavirus.

Today’s lunchtime in-person event also appeared to counter his government’s own health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing as the attendees clustered together tightly in front of the balcony and cheered loudly at his remarks.

The campaign-style rally came after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away.



a group of people posing for the camera: Supporters cheer on Donald Trump during his White House event on 10 October. Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters


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Supporters cheer on Donald Trump during his White House event on 10 October. Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters

Video: White House spokesman sidesteps question on Trump’s last negative coronavirus test (The Washington Post)

White House spokesman sidesteps question on Trump’s last negative coronavirus test

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He explored several familiar themes in his speech, attacking Democrats for an agenda he said was “beyond socialism” and promising again that the battle against Covid-19, which has claimed more than 210,000 American lives, was being won.

He also touted, with little evidence, “the fastest economic recovery in history”, and heaped praise on Black and Hispanic voters in an apparent attempt to shore up support from demographic groups that polls suggest he has been making inroads with recently.

“We’re starting very, very big with our rallies and with our everything because we cannot allow our country to become a socialist nation,” he said.

As for coronavirus: “It’s going to disappear, it is disappearing,” he added, pledging that a vaccine was coming in “record time”, and contradicting growing evidence of a new autumn surge of the virus in many states. Twice he referred to Covid-19 as “the China virus”, resurrecting a racist theming of a pandemic that has affected almost every country in the world.

Trump also praised law enforcement, and repeated again his unfounded assertions of “crooked ballots and a rigged election”.

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Trump gives in-person remarks at ‘peaceful protest for Law & Order’

President Trump will speak in-person Saturday on the South Lawn of the White House in what the administration is characterizing as a “peaceful protest” for law and order.

The president will make his remarks at 2 p.m. ET, and the event marks the first in-person event for both Trump and first lady Melania Trump since they tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 1.

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Trump Holds Event On Law And Order At White House

WASHINGTON, DC — Supporters lined up outside the White House South Lawn on Saturday, hoping to catch a glimpse of President Donald Trump’s first public event since he tested positive for COVID-19 just over a week ago.

Thousands are expected to attend what the Trump administration is billing as “a peaceful protest for law & order.” In an address scheduled to start around 2 p.m. ET, Trump will speak from the White House balcony, The Associated Press reported.

Watch live using the above video player or on the White House’s YouTube channel.

RELATED: Thousands Expected At Trump’s First Public Event Since Virus

All attendees were required to bring masks or masks would be provided for them, and also would be given temperature checks and asked to fill out a brief questionnaire.

Attendees were “strongly encouraged” to follow CDC guidelines, which include mask-wearing and social distancing, AP reported.

Saturday’s event comes two weeks after a Rose Garden event that has since been labeled a “superspreader” event. More than two dozen people linked to the White House have contracted COVID-19 since attending the Sept. 26 event announcing Judge Amy Coney Barrett as Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court.

District of Columbia virus restrictions prohibit outdoor gatherings larger than 50 people, although the rule has not been strictly enforced, according to AP. Masks are mandatory outdoors for most people, but the regulations don’t apply on federal land

This article originally appeared on the White House Patch

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Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


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Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.

But after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away, the president is seizing an opportunity to try to reposition himself in the race, despite the apparent health risk to attendees from a man likely to still be contagious.

In a Friday night interview on Fox News, Trump, who was given a cocktail of antiviral drugs and strong steroids during his hospital stay, insisted he was “medication-free”.

“We pretty much finished, and now we’ll see how things go. But pretty much nothing,” Trump said when Fox medical analyst Dr Marc Siegel asked the president what medications he was still taking.

Earlier in the day, Dr Sean Conley, Trump’s personal physician, issued a letter clearing the president to return to in-person campaign events, but omitting any medical justification, including crucial information about any negative coronavirus tests.

In the Friday interview, Trump said he had been tested, but gave a vague answer about it. “I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet,” he said. “But I’ve been retested and I know I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free.”

Trump’s speech today at the White House South Lawn will address “law and order” and protests around the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd and racial issues, sources revealed on Friday.

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Trump to Go Ahead With ‘Law and Order’ Protest Amid D.C. Mayor’s Ban on ‘Mass Gatherings’

President Donald Trump is expected to give in-person remarks during an event today on the South Lawn of the White House, despite his coronavirus diagnosis and restrictions on mass gatherings that remain in effect for Washington, D.C.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.


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President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.

The president’s schedule for today suggests that he will deliver “remarks at a peaceful protest for law and order” at 2 p.m., confirming the ABC News report yesterday which said Trump was expected to address attendees from a White House balcony.

‘Get Out There’: Trump Removes Face Mask For Photo Op As He Returns To White House

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If it goes ahead, it will mark the president’s first in-person event since announcing last Friday that he and the First Lady had both tested positive for COVID-19.

Trump spent three nights at Walter Reed Medical Center, returning to the White House on Monday while appearing to have labored breathing. He has since released video statements, including one which touted his treatment as a possible cure.

Under medical care, the president was reportedly administered antiviral drug remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone and an unproven experimental drug from Regeneron. He said on Twitter yesterday a “big rally” was scheduled for Florida on Monday.

According to CNBC, all attendees at today’s event will be asked to wear face masks on White House grounds and will undertake a temperature check and brief questionnaire. It was not immediately clear how many people were expected to take part.

Under Phase Two of Washington, DC’s COVID-19 restrictions, which are still in effect, mass gatherings of more than 50 people in a single location are prohibited.

“If shouting or singing is involved, these activities can create droplets that may spread the virus that causes COVID-19 if you are infected. To prevent this, wear a facemask and find alternative ways to voice your message, such as through holding signs and using noise makers,” explain the guidelines from D.C.’s Mayor, Muriel Bowser.

The White House event today comes after a string of Trump administration officials who attended a previous gathering in the Rose Garden on September 26 tested positive for the disease, described as a “superspreader” event by top scientist Anthony Fauci.

On Thursday, D.C. health officials urged anyone who had worked in the White House in the past two weeks to contact local health agencies for guidance about their “potential need to quarantine,” noting there had been “limited contact tracing.”

Despite health concerns, the president’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, claimed in

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Federal court orders change to mail-in voting while Missouri’s high court affirms law | Law and order

The attorney general’s office told the court that suspending the notarization requirement after thousands of people already have requested ballots could be confusing and grant one group of voters a privilege that others did not have.

The case before the state Supreme Court is an appeal of a decision last month by Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem, who ruled against the plaintiffs. Beetem wrote that the evidence showed that election authorities provided “a safe voting experience” during the August primary and “will continue to do so in the upcoming general election.”

Supreme Court Judge Paul Wilson concurred with the majority. In a separate decision, he said the Legislature could have removed the notarization requirement, but didn’t.

“(T)his Court’s role is to construe the law that was passed, not to lament the laws that were not passed,” Wilson wrote.

Absentee voting began Sept. 22. An estimated 364,000 absentee ballots have been requested so far, compared to the 305,000 requested in 2016.

The decision came as a second case in Cole County went to trial Tuesday in Circuit Judge Daniel Green’s courtroom. The lawsuit, filed by the Washington, D.C.-based American Women advocacy organization, also seeks to ensure that ballots are counted even if mail service delays cause them to be delivered after the polls close.

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