Tag: parliament

Kyrgyz parliament set to meet, discuss new government amid unrest

BISHKEK (Reuters) – Kyrgyzstan’s parliament was set to meet on Saturday and potentially vote in a new government to end a power vacuum in the strategically important Central Asian nation which has been gripped by unrest since a contested Oct. 4 election.

The former Soviet republic of 6.5 million hosts a Russian military airbase and serves as a hub for trade with neighbouring China. It is also home to a large Canadian-owned mining operation.

Military checkpoints were put up overnight around capital Bishkek and armoured personnel carriers were spotted in the city after President Sooronbai Jeenbekov ordered troops to deploy and re-establish order amid flare-ups of violence.

The parliament planned to gather in the presidential residence on the outskirts of Bishkek, after its own offices were ransacked by protesters who seized key government buildings on Tuesday.

Russia, which exerts significant influence on Kyrgyzstan, this week described the situation as “chaos”. More than 1,200 people have been injured and one person has been killed in street clashes since protests erupted on Monday.

It was unclear which candidates the legislature would consider for premiership, although deputy speaker Aida Kasymaliyeva urged MPs to reconsider the nomination of opposition politician Sadyr Zhaparov, saying that voting him in would only divide the country further.

Zhaparov’s supporters clashed with followers of a few other parties on Friday which nominated their own candidate, Omurbek Babanov. Several people were wounded including a politician nominated to serve as Babanov’s deputy.

The opposition is divided between 11 parties which represent clan interests in a country that has already seen two presidents toppled by popular revolts since 2005.

(Reporting by Olzhas Auyezov and Olga Dzyubenko; editing by Richard Pullin)

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European Parliament cements position on climate change before haggling by member states

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union lawmakers have backed a plan to cut greenhouse gases by 60% from 1990 levels by 2030, hoping member states will not try to water the target down during upcoming negotiations.

FILE PHOTO: A general view shows European Council President Charles Michel addressing an extraordinary plenary session of the EU Parliament following an EU leaders summit, in Brussels, Belgium July 23, 2020. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Results of the vote released on Thursday confirm their preliminary votes earlier this week on a landmark law to make the EU’s climate targets legally binding.

The law, which contains the new EU emissions-cutting goal for 2030, passed by a large majority of 231 votes.

Parliament must now agree the final law with the EU’s 27 member countries, only a few of whom have said they would support a 60% emissions-cutting target. Lawmakers want to avoid countries whittling it away to below the level of emissions cuts proposed by the EU executive of at least 55%.

The EU’s current 2030 target is a 40% emissions cut.

Parliament also supported a proposal to launch an independent scientific council to advise on climate policy – a system already in place in Britain and Sweden – and a carbon budget, setting out the emissions the EU could produce without scuppering its climate commitments.

With climate-related impacts such as more intense heatwaves and wildfires already felt across Europe, and thousands of young people taking to the streets last month to demand tougher action, the EU is under pressure to ramp up its climate policies.

Groups representing investors with 62 trillion euros in assets under management, plus hundreds of businesses and NGOs on Thursday wrote to EU leaders urging them to agree an emissions-cutting target of at least 55% for 2030.

Scientists say this target, which has been proposed by the European Commission, is the minimum effort needed to give the EU a realistic shot at becoming climate neutral by 2050. The Commission wants the new 2030 goal finalised by the end of the year.

However, the climate law will require compromise from member countries. Wealthier states with large renewable energy resources are pushing for deeper emissions cuts, but coal-heavy countries including Poland and Czech Republic fear the economic fallout of tougher targets.

Given its political sensitivity, heads of government will likely decide their position on the 2030 target by unanimity, meaning one country could block it.

Reporting by Kate Abnett, editing by Marine Strauss and Philippa Fletcher

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Trudeau government survives confidence vote in Canadian Parliament

Lawmakers voted 177 to 152 in support of the speech, which was written by Trudeau and his aides, but delivered as is tradition by Governor General Julie Payette, Queen Elizabeth’s representative in Canada, on Sept. 23.

With his government reduced to a minority in last year’s federal elections, Trudeau has been reliant on the backing of at least one main opposition party to pass bills and stay in power. He secured support for the speech from the New Democrats after revising a relief bill to expand access to paid sick leave and benefits for workers left unemployed by the pandemic.

Parliament passed that legislation last week in a vote that the government also considered a test of confidence.

Trudeau, who was on the defensive for much of the summer during an ethics controversy that had pushed down his approval ratings, made the controversial decision in August to seek the suspension of Parliament. He pledged to return with a “bold” plan for getting through the pandemic and accelerating the economic recovery, which he said he would put to a confidence vote.

The speech, which was short on detail and dollar figures, reiterated several promises made in last year’s federal election campaign and featured others that would require support from Canada’s provinces and territories.

In it, Trudeau pledged to create 1 million jobs, to legislate net-zero emissions by 2050, to make a “significant” investment to create a national child-care system and to work toward a national program for prescription drug coverage. He also promised support for businesses that might need to shut down temporarily because of the pandemic.

The speech included a vow to use “whatever fiscal firepower” is necessary to address the challenges wrought by the public health crisis. Pandemic relief programs are projected to push the federal budget deficit beyond $250 billion, and business groups have sought details on plans to manage the debt.

“This is not the time for austerity,” the speech said.

The other opposition parties in Parliament voted against the speech. The Conservatives criticized it as “another speech full of Liberal buzzwords and grand gestures” that paid no attention to the struggles of the oil and gas sector. The Bloc Québécois lambasted it for infringing on areas of provincial jurisdiction and for failing to provide greater health-care transfers to the provinces.

Trudeau’s next test of confidence could come when his government introduces a budget or fiscal update in the coming months.

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European Parliament set for tight vote on ‘historic’ climate law

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Lawmakers in the European Parliament expect a tight vote on Tuesday on the European Union’s new climate target for 2030, with support splintered over the bloc’s green ambitions.

FILE PHOTO: A general view shows European Council President Charles Michel addressing an extraordinary plenary session of the EU Parliament following an EU leaders summit, in Brussels, Belgium July 23, 2020. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

The assembly will vote in the evening on a landmark bill to make EU climate targets legally binding. The most contentious part is a new target for emissions cuts this decade.

The EU’s current goal is to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, against 1990 levels. That needs upgrading if the bloc is to become climate neutral by 2050.

The European Commission last month proposed a 2030 emissions cut of “at least 55%”, which it said was economically feasible but would require tougher policies for many sectors, including tighter car emissions standards and higher carbon costs for industry and airlines.

The European Parliament’s environment committee last month voted for a 60% cut target for 2030, and groups representing just under half of the assembly said they would back this goal on Tuesday. Some officials said enough extra votes had been secured for a razor-thin majority.

“I think we have a historic opportunity to take the climate policy to higher levels,” said Sweden’s Jytte Guteland, lead lawmaker on the issue.

“It will be a very tight result,” said Pascal Canfin, chair of Parliament’s environment committee.

Conservative lawmakers are meanwhile rallying behind a proposal by the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP) to cut emissions by at least 55% this decade.

“The 60% is stretching too much,” German EPP lawmaker Peter Liese said, adding that he was “quite optimistic” his proposal would gain majority support.

Some Green lawmakers said they could support a 55% goal, but took issue with EPP’s plan to count carbon sinks – emissions absorbed by forests – and carbon credits from overseas projects towards the target.

“That is a clear red line for us,” Green lawmaker Bas Eickhout said.

The split in Parliament reflects broader divisions among the EU’s 27 countries, which must also approve the 2030 goal.

Wealthy western and northern countries largely back an emissions cut of at least 55%, while others oppose tougher climate policies that could hit their strategic economic sectors, such as coal mining in Poland and automobile manufacturing in the Czech Republic.

Reporting by Kate Abnett; Editing by John Chalmers and Alex Richardson

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European Parliament Set for Tight Vote on ‘Historic’ Climate Law | World News

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Lawmakers in the European Parliament expect a tight vote on Tuesday on the European Union’s new climate target for 2030, with support splintered over the bloc’s green ambitions.

The assembly will vote in the evening on a landmark bill to make EU climate targets legally binding. The most contentious part is a new target for emissions cuts this decade.

The EU’s current goal is to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, against 1990 levels. That needs upgrading if the bloc is to become climate neutral by 2050.

The European Commission last month proposed a 2030 emissions cut of “at least 55%”, which it said was economically feasible but would require tougher policies for many sectors, including tighter car emissions standards and higher carbon costs for industry and airlines.

The European Parliament’s environment committee last month voted for a 60% cut target for 2030, and groups representing just under half of the assembly said they would back this goal on Tuesday. Some officials said enough extra votes had been secured for a razor-thin majority.

“I think we have a historic opportunity to take the climate policy to higher levels,” said Sweden’s Jytte Guteland, lead lawmaker on the issue.

“It will be a very tight result,” said Pascal Canfin, chair of Parliament’s environment committee.

Conservative lawmakers are meanwhile rallying behind a proposal by the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP) to cut emissions by at least 55% this decade.

“The 60% is stretching too much,” German EPP lawmaker Peter Liese said, adding that he was “quite optimistic” his proposal would gain majority support.

Some Green lawmakers said they could support a 55% goal, but took issue with EPP’s plan to count carbon sinks – emissions absorbed by forests – and carbon credits from overseas projects towards the target.

“That is a clear red line for us,” Green lawmaker Bas Eickhout said.

The split in Parliament reflects broader divisions among the EU’s 27 countries, which must also approve the 2030 goal.

Wealthy western and northern countries largely back an emissions cut of at least 55%, while others oppose tougher climate policies that could hit their strategic economic sectors, such as coal mining in Poland and automobile manufacturing in the Czech Republic.

(Reporting by Kate Abnett; Editing by John Chalmers and Alex Richardson)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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British Parliament Vs. United States Congress

Political science has a relationship in the study of law. Many of the weapons used by criminals are already illegal. A prohibition in opposition to retroactive (ex submit facto) legal legal guidelines guarantees people know the legal guidelines earlier than the government prosecutes them for a given action. As Hitler and his Nazi party grew in energy, the “Regulation on Firearms and Ammunition” was enacted.

This must be read Au fait, by every American that cared how this country is run. Watkins as I promised you, I read your hooked up hub in one in every of my HP’s articles this is a very interesting narrative about the Progressive Motion, which I discover one of the most fascinating periods of American fashionable historical past.

It was far simpler for him to use his speeches, Nazi help, the legal guidelines already in place, and the psychological & financial mindset of the German folks to grow to be Chancellor of Germany and from there grow to be the dictator that initiated and orcestrated the Second World War.

James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and others, held that the federal government was not the only or ultimate decide of its own authority, holding that this might “make it, and never the Structure, the choose of its powers. Let me carry up one other, related, subject – that of legal guidelines making double murder costs against those who kill a pregnant lady.

B) In a federation governmental powers are basically distributed by the structure between the Central government on the one hand and the unit government on the small print of division vary in different the principle folllowed in the division is that all matters which are primarily of common interest and require uniformity of regulation throughout the nation reminiscent of overseas affairs,defence,foreign money and coinage are positioned below the central government, and the resr is left to the Unit governments.…

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