Tag: passes

Indonesia Passes Law to Simplify Labor, Investment Rules

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia has rushed the approval of a law aimed at creating jobs and attracting investments, a day before 2 million workers were set to stage a three-day strike to reject it.



a group of people walking down the street: Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.


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Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.

The parliament agreed to pass the omnibus bill on jobs in a plenary meeting on Monday. It was previously set to hold the meeting on Oct. 8.

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The law that seeks to simplify and revise more than 70 existing regulations will overhaul the country’s labor rules, make it easier for companies to secure permits and ease foreign ownership requirements. Its passage sets the income tax from capital gains to 20%, while some dividend taxes will be exempted.

Indonesian Workers Rally Against New Job Bill, Massive Layoffs

The bill’s passage could help President Joko Widodo shore up an economy that’s set to slip into another contraction in the third quarter as the continued spread of the coronavirus damped household spending and investments. The government has sought to speed up state spending, while warning that growth can’t come from the public sector alone.

The rupiah gained 0.4% to 14,800 a dollar as lawmakers voiced their support for the bill, the steepest rise in two weeks. The benchmark Jakarta Composite Index of shares advanced 0.7%.

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Unemployment Fund

As part of the law, the government will set up an unemployment fund to support workers who lost their jobs, with the premiums paid for by the state budget. The fund will give cash payments, provide access to the job market and pay for training. The law will also maintain workers’ rights to maternity and menstruation leave as set out in the existing labor rule.

The law has been met with opposition from labor unions and politicians who sought to reject the reduction in severance pay and the introduction of indefinite labor contracts. Activists have also spoken out against the bill, which lets investments judged to be low risk to continue without needing to submit a report on their expected environmental impact.

Other changes included in the jobs creation omnibus law:

Government to set up one-map policy to solve the issue of overlapping land claims and conflicts, which would ensure legal certainty for businessesThose who hire foreign workers are required to submit a plan for how the employee will work, while banning foreigners from holding roles that oversee personnelSimplified process for registering intellectual property and getting halal certificationLaw to speed up the construction of low-cost homes

(Updates with market movement in fifth paragraph.)

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Indonesia Passes Law to Cut Corporate Tax, Simplify Labor Rules

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia has rushed the approval of a law aimed at creating jobs and attracting investments, a day before 2 million workers were set to protest against it.



a group of people walking down the street: Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.


© Bloomberg
Workers transport carts loaded with boxes at Tanah Abang market in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Indonesia is scheduled to announce its second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Aug. 5.

The parliament agreed to pass the omnibus bill on jobs in a plenary meeting on Monday. That’s one day before labor unions were planning to stage a national three-day strike across 300 cities to reject it. The parliament was previously set to hold its plenary meeting on Oct. 8.

The law that seeks to simplify and revise more than 70 existing regulations will overhaul the country’s labor rules, make it easier for companies to secure permits and ease foreign ownership rules. Its passage means the corporate income tax will be gradually lowered to 20%, from 22% currently, while some dividend taxes will be exempted.

Video: Senate fends off government shutdown with temporary funding bill (Fox Business)

Senate fends off government shutdown with temporary funding bill

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The bill’s passage may help President Joko Widodo shore up an economy that’s set to slip into another contraction this quarter as the continued spread of the coronavirus damped household spending and investments. The government has sought to speed up state spending, while warning that growth can’t come from the public sector alone.

The law has been met with opposition from labor unions and politicians who sought to reject the reduction in severance pay and the introduction of indefinite labor contracts. Activists have also spoken out against the bill, which exempts investments judged to be low-risk to go ahead without submitting a report on their expected environmental impact.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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California passes landmark law to study proposals for reparations

The law establishes a task force to make recommendations.

California became the first state to pass a law establishing a task force to study and make recommendations on reparations for Black Americans.

The landmark legislation calls for the creation of a nine-member commission to “inform Californians about slavery and explore ways the state might provide reparations,” according to a statement from Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office.

The bill was authored by Assemblymember Shirley Weber of San Diego, who introduced it to state legislators back in February. Newsom signed it into law on Wednesday.

“California has historically led the country on civil rights, yet we have not come to terms with our state’s ugly past that allowed slaveholding within our borders and returned escaped slaves to their masters,” Weber said in a statement after Newsom signed the bill.

PHOTO: Assemblywoman Shirley Weber at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., June 10, 2020.

Assemblywoman Shirley Weber calls on members of the Assembly to approve her measure to place a constitutional amendment on the ballot to let voters decide if the state should overturn its ban on affirmative action programs, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., June 10, 2020.

Assemblywoman Shirley Weber calls on members of the Assembly to approve her measure to place a constitutional amendment on the ballot to let voters decide if the state should overturn its ban on affirmative action programs, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., June 10, 2020.

She added that Newsom’s signature on the bill “demonstrates that our state is dedicated to leading the nation on confronting and addressing systemic injustice.”

The text of the California bill calls for the task force to “study and develop reparation proposals for African Americans, with a special consideration for Americans who are descendants of persons enslaved in the United States.”

Weber’s legislation has gotten public support from rapper Ice Cube, who tweeted his thanks to Newsom.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive,” Newsom said in a statement. “Our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions.”

The topic of reparations in the U.S. has courted controversy as economists and advocates debate who will pay, who qualifies for payments and what payments might look like.

The dark legacy of slavery in the U.S. has lived on for decades through discriminatory policies such as Jim Crow laws and redlining, overt and systemic racism that contributed significantly to a vast wealth gap.

In 2016, the typical white family had a net worth nearly 10 times that of a Black family, according to a Brookings Institute analysis. Moreover in 2019, the average wage gap between a Black and white worker in the U.S. was 26.5%, according to the Economic Policy Institute.

As the nation grapples with other inequities Black Americans face — disparate health outcomes amid the COVID-19 pandemic and mounting instances of police brutality — many advocates are renewing calls for state and

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California passes a first-of-its-kind law to consider reparations for slavery

By Madeline Holcombe | CNN

California Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a bill establishing a task force to study and make recommendations on reparations for slavery.

Bill AB 3121 — the first of its kind in any state — was signed on Wednesday. It creates a nine-member task force that will inform Californians about slavery and explore ways the state might provide reparations, Newsom’s office said in a news release.

The task force will convene in the wake of nationwide protests calling for racial justice and police reform following the death of George Floyd while in police custody in May. Democratic lawmakers in Congress have also called for a vote on a bill to study reparations.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive. Our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions,” said Newsom in the release.

Newsom acknowledged that Black Californian’s and people of color in the state still face “discrimination and disadvantages.”

Other measures

The bill is joined by two others in the state that target structural racism and bias in the legal system by prohibiting the use of race, ethnicity and national origin to seek or obtain convictions or impose sentences, and to reduce discrimination in jury selection, the press release adds.

“While there is still so much work to do to unravel this legacy, these pieces of legislation are important steps in the right direction to building a more inclusive and equitable future for all.”

The idea of reparations for slavery has been in and out of political conversations since the end of the Civil War. Republicans have been critical of the concept, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell saying last year he opposed the idea, arguing “none of us currently living are responsible” for what he called America’s “original sin.”

But the city of Asheville, North Carolina, unanimously approved a reparations resolution for Black residents in July, formally apologizing for the role it played in slavery and implementing racist policies.

Instead of mandating direct cash payments to descendants of slaves, the city plans to make investments in areas where Black residents face disparities.

In February this year, California also made a formal apology for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Internment was the largest single forced relocation in US history, with more than 100,000 Japanese Americans incarcerated around the country.

“Given recent national events, it is all the more important to learn from the mistakes of the past and to ensure that such an assault on freedom will never again happen to any community in the United States,” the resolution reads.

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Senate passes stopgap funding measure to avoid government shutdown

The Senate passed a resolution with broad bipartisan support Wednesday to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a shutdown before the new fiscal year begins at midnight.



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Trump, who was holding a re-election rally in Minnesota, was expected to sign the measure when he returned to the White House. The stopgap measure passed by an 84-10 vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. The Democratic-controlled House passed the legislation, known as a continuing resolution, last week on a 359-57 vote.

The legislation includes a bailout for farmers — which Trump and Republicans fought to include — in exchange for boosts in funding for nutrition benefits for poor families requested by Democrats. It also continues to fund various parts of the federal government.

Farming and food benefits for poor families appeared to be the only coronavirus-related items included in the resolution as top Democrats, the White House and Republicans continue to haggle over continued Covid-19 relief for families.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., met Wednesday with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to again discuss the next round of coronavirus aid. The House plans to vote Thursday on an updated aid package that includes compromises Democrats have made, she said.

“We will be proceeding with our vote … on the updated Heroes Act in order to formalize our proffer to Republicans in the negotiations to address the health and economic catastrophe in our country,” she said in a statement.

Mnuchin said Wednesday on Fox Business that the updated $2.2 trillion, which was slimmed down from the $3.4 trillion bill the House passed in May, is something “we’re not going to do.”

“The good news is the speaker has come down from her $3.4 trillion deal. If there’s a fair compromise, we’re prepared to do it,” he said.

The interim spending bill also sets up a potential political fight toward the end of the year when it expires and lawmakers have to pass another temporary spending resolution or an annual spending bill just before a new Congress is sworn in, along with, potentially, a new administration.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., criticized the process last week, saying that the resolution is only temporary and that both chambers need to work on passing traditional spending bills.

“I’m hopeful that everyone will put their heads together to get the appropriation process done, and we’ll probably do it in an omnibus, not single appropriation bills, which is not a good way to do it, either,” he said.

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Senate passes stopgap government funding measure to avoid government shutdown

The Senate on Wednesday passed a resolution with broad bipartisan support to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a shutdown before the new fiscal year begins at midnight.



a man wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by NBC News


Trump, who is holding a re-election rally in Minnesota, is expected to sign the measure before the deadline. The stopgap measure passed by an 84-10 vote in the GOP-controlled Senate. The Democratic-controlled House passed the legislation, known as a continuing resolution or “CR,” last week with a 359-57 vote.

The legislation includes a bailout for farmers — which Trump and Republicans fought to have included — in exchange for boosts in funding to nutrition benefits to poor families requested by Democrats. It also continues to fund various parts of the federal government.

Farming and food benefits to poor families appeared to be the only coronavirus-related items included in the resolution as top Democrats, the White House and Republicans continue to haggle over continued Covid-19 relief to families.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., held a meeting with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on Wednesday to again discuss the next round of coronavirus aid. The House plans to vote on an updated aid package on Thursday that includes compromises Democrats have made, she said.

“We will be proceeding with our vote … on the updated Heroes Act in order to formalize our proffer to Republicans in the negotiations to address the health and economic catastrophe in our country,” she said in a statement.

Mnuchin said Wednesday on Fox Business that the updated $2.2 trillion, which was slimmed-down from the $3.4 trillion bill passed by the House in May, is something “we’re not going to do.”

“The good news is the speaker has come down from her $3.4 trillion deal. If there’s a fair compromise, we’re prepared to do it,” he said.

The interim spending bill also sets up a potential political fight toward the end of the year when it expires and lawmakers have to pass another temporary spending resolution or an annual spending bill just before a new Congress is sworn in and, potentially, a new administration.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., however, criticized the process last week, saying that the resolution is only temporary and both chambers need to work on passing traditional spending bills.

“I’m hopeful that everyone will put their heads together to get the appropriation process done and we’ll probably do it in an omnibus, not single appropriation bills, which is not a good way to do it either,” he said.

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US Senate passes stopgap to prevent government shutdown

The US Senate passed a budget bill Wednesday that avoids an imminent government shutdown and extends funding weeks beyond the November 3 presidential election, after Democrats reached a deal with the White House and Republicans.

The bipartisan text, which easily cleared the Senate 84 votes to 10 a week after it passed the House of Representatives, now goes to the White House.

President Donald Trump would need to sign the stop-gap measure by 11:59 pm Wednesday to avoid a partial government shutdown, as fiscal year 2021 technically begins on October 1.

The short-term legislation would keep government federal agencies operating at current funding levels until December 11, easing pressure on Congress — and presidential candidates Trump and Democrat Joe Biden — to address the issue during a heated election.

The measure adds nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for children and families, and extends funding for community health centers to continue to address Covid-19 and health disparities.

Last week on the day the measure cleared the House, the United States surpassed the grim milestone of 200,000 coronavirus-related deaths.

Separate from the federal budget, lawmakers are in the middle of negotiating a much-needed, trillion-dollar-plus relief package for thousands of communities and millions of families suffering during the pandemic.  

Congress, which is deeply divided along party lines, would not likely have been able to reach a broader agreement on a new 2021 budget before the end of the fiscal year.

“I hope members of Congress can come back to the negotiating table in the coming weeks and work in a spirit of cooperation to pass a comprehensive funding bill,” Senate Republican Roger Wicker said.

“A continuing resolution is no substitute for a full appropriations package,” he added.

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Senate Passes Stopgap Funding Bill to Avert Government Shutdown

(Bloomberg) — The Senate Wednesday passed a stopgap spending bill needed to prevent an Oct. 1 shutdown of the federal government on an 84 to 10 vote.



a large building: The U.S. Capitol building stands in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Senate returns today with the Trump administration and Democrats no closer to agreement on a new virus relief package than they were when talks broke off in early August, despite the pressure of the U.S. election in 56 days.


© Bloomberg
The U.S. Capitol building stands in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Senate returns today with the Trump administration and Democrats no closer to agreement on a new virus relief package than they were when talks broke off in early August, despite the pressure of the U.S. election in 56 days.

The bill, H.R. 8337, which easily passed the House last week, now heads to President Donald Trump’s desk. He is expected to sign it before the midnight deadline.

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The funding bill would keep the government operating through Dec. 11 at current spending levels.

Congressional Republicans and Democrats, along with White House officials, last week removed the final stumbling block, striking a deal by agreeing to provide aid to farmers and more food assistance for low-income families.

The bill provides as much as $30 billion for the Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corp., which the Trump administration has used to send virus relief payments to farmers. Democrats got almost $8 billion for a pandemic program to feed children who normally receive school lunches.

With the temporary spending bill finished, lawmakers will try to complete work on the 12 annual appropriations bills for fiscal 2021 in the post-election lame-duck session in November and December. The Senate hasn’t drafted any of the bills so far, and there’s likely a battle ahead over paying for Trump’s wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and replacing military funds he redirected to pay for border security last year.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin agreed earlier this month to keep discussion of a coronavirus relief package separate from the stopgap bill. The two leaders on Wednesday held their first in-person talks since August, and while no deal on the stimulus was reached, they plan to continue discussions.

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U.S. Senate passes bill to fund government through December 11 and avert shutdown

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate approved on Wednesday a temporary funding bill to keep the government open through Dec. 11, sending the measure to President Donald Trump for signing into law.



a person standing in front of a building: The United States Capitol dome is seen in Washington, D.C.


© Reuters/ANDREW KELLY
The United States Capitol dome is seen in Washington, D.C.

Government funding runs out at midnight Wednesday (0400 GMT on Thursday). The legislation, which had previously passed the House of Representatives, and passed the Senate on a vote of 84-10, continues funding most programs at current levels.

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Assuming Trump signs the bill, it will avoid a government shutdown in the middle of a pandemic and ahead of the Nov. 3 U.S. elections.

All 10 senators voting against the bill were Republicans.

The measure generally maintains current spending levels and gives lawmakers more time to work out budget details for the fiscal year that ends on Sept. 30 2021, including for military operations, healthcare, national parks, space programs, and airport and border security.

The legislation’s Dec. 11 end date will require Congress to return to the government funding question again during its post-election lame-duck session, after what is likely to be a bruising fight over whether to confirm Trump’s third Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett.

(Reporting by Richard Cowan; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and David Gregorio)

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Israel Passes Law To Limit Protests During ‘Virus Emergency’

Israel’s parliament approved a law early Wednesday restricting demonstrations as part of a coronavirus-related state of emergency, that critics say is aimed at silencing protests against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

The law, which passed its final reading by 46 votes to 38, was meant to be part of a slew of measures approved by parliament last Friday tightening a second nationwide lockdown.

But debate on the measure was put off, as the government struggled to secure the necessary votes amid an opposition outcry and a protest outside parliament on Tuesday.

The lockdown, which went into force on September 18, shutters the majority of workplaces, markets, places of worship, schools and cultural venues.

It also bans journeys of more than a kilometre (0.6 miles) from home, other than for essential purposes such as buying food and medicine or receiving medical treatment.

Israeli demonstrators, angry at the new government powers to restrict gatherings, protest outside parliament ahead of the vote Israeli demonstrators, angry at the new government powers to restrict gatherings, protest outside parliament ahead of the vote Photo: AFP / Menahem KAHANA

The new law gives the government powers to declare a “special emergency caused by the coronavirus pandemic” for renewable periods of one week.

During that time, the one-kilometre limit on travel will apply to demonstrations, and there will also be restrictions on numbers.

The state of emergency can be declared only during a lockdown.

The government has yet to use those powers, but with more than 237,000 coronavirus infections and 1,528 deaths in a population of nine million, Israel currently has the world’s highest weekly infection rate per capita.

In recent months, weekly protests have been held outside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's residence demanding that he quit over his management of the coronavirus pandemic and his ongoing trial on corruption charges In recent months, weekly protests have been held outside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s residence demanding that he quit over his management of the coronavirus pandemic and his ongoing trial on corruption charges Photo: AFP / Emmanuel DUNAND

Meir Cohen, of main opposition party Yesh Atid-Telem, condemned the new controls on demonstrations as a “slippery slope”.

Yair Golan, of the leftwing Meretz party, warned that the new law “won’t stop the demonstrations.”

“The anger growing in the streets will find its way out,” he said.

In recent months, weekly protests have been held outside Netanyahu’s Jerusalem residence, demanding that he quit over his management of the pandemic and his ongoing trial on corruption charges.

Shortly after the measures were finalised, an opposition group, the Movement for Quality Government in Israel, filed a petition to the supreme court challenging the law’s legality.

“In the darkness of the night, members of the Knesset brought Israel a step closer to crushing democracy, but we won’t let that happen,” the movement said in a statement.

“And don’t let them say the law is crucial to save people from corona,” the statement added, pointing out that demonstrations in vehicles where people drive cars in convoy on the streets — where risk of infection was minimal — were prohibited as well.

“There are no health considerations in this legislation, rather a sweeping prohibition on demonstrating against a prime minister accused of bribery, fraud and a breach of trust,” the movement said.

On Tuesday, Netanyahu

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