Tag: Poll

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to follow his predecessor Shinzo Abe’s policies including the coronavirus pandemic response, Suga has pledged to allow insurance coverage for expensive fertility treatments.

On the pandemic impact on employment and wages, 47% of Japan firms suffered it, causing many to curb new hiring, slash wages and reduce staff, the survey showed.

One third of firms expect employment to remain short of pre-pandemic levels at the year end, while a slim majority, 52% of firms, saw capital expenditure would undershoot their initial plans, dampening prospects for sustained economic recovery.

Reporting by Tetsushi Kajimoto; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to follow his predecessor Shinzo Abe’s policies including the coronavirus pandemic response, Suga has pledged to allow insurance coverage for expensive fertility treatments.

On the pandemic impact on employment and wages, 47% of Japan firms suffered it, causing many to curb new hiring, slash wages and reduce staff, the survey showed.

One third of firms expect employment to remain short of pre-pandemic levels at the year end, while a slim majority, 52% of firms, saw capital expenditure would undershoot their initial plans, dampening prospects for sustained economic recovery.

(Reporting by Tetsushi Kajimoto; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

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Poll: Many Americans blame virus crisis on US government

The White House is seen in the background as sign of the National COVID-19 Remembrance, event at The Ellipse outside of the White House, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

The White House is seen in the background as sign of the National COVID-19 Remembrance, event at The Ellipse outside of the White House, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

AP

More Americans blame the U.S. government instead of foreign nations for the coronavirus crisis in the United States, a rebuke to the Trump administration’s contention that China or other countries are most at fault, a new poll shows.

The poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was conducted before President Donald Trump tested positive for the virus Friday and was hospitalized. Trump has downplayed the severity and impact of the pandemic in recent months.

Although many see plenty of blame to go around and there’s a wide bipartisan divide over who is responsible, 56% of Americans say the U.S. government has substantial responsibility for the situation. That compares with 47% who place that much blame on the governments of other countries and only 39% who say the same about the World Health Organization.

“It reflects a general lack of confidence in the way the government has handled the situation,” said Austin Wright of the Harris School for Public Policy.

More than 1 million people worldwide, including more than 200,000 Americans, have died of COVID-19 in the outbreak. Trump has squarely blamed the virus’ spread on China, where it originated, and an inadequate response from the WHO.

As he faces a rough reelection contest in November, Trump has steadily ramped up criticism of China for the virus and announced the U.S. would halt funding for and withdraw from the international health agency over alleged Chinese interference in its work. Critics, including public health experts, have said China bears some responsibility but have also harshly criticized Trump’s response.

The poll shows Democrats are especially likely to say the U.S. government is responsible for the situation, while many Republicans are likely to place the blame elsewhere. Among Democrats, 79% say the U.S. government has a great deal of responsibility, while 37% say that about other countries’ governments and 27% about the WHO. Among Republicans, 38% say the U.S. government is responsible, compared with 60% for the governments of other countries and 55% the WHO.

Self-described conservative Republican Ralph Martinez, a 67-year-old grocery store manager from the Fort Worth, Texas area, said he wasn’t sure that any government could have handled it better and dismissed criticism that Trump had downplayed the matter.

“It’s an open question, honestly,” he said. “I don’t care who’s in office, I think they’re going to do their best for everyone. But how much can they do?”

Martinez, who said he had to throw a customer out of his store for not wearing a mask recently, lauded Trump for not wanting to create panic in the early stages of the outbreak in the U.S. He also recalled unprecedented runs on items such as toilet paper and paper towels when people realized the

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Poll: More blame US government than foreign nations for coronavirus crisis

More than half of Americans blame the federal government for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a higher number than those who said they primarily blamed foreign governments such as China for the disease’s spread.

A poll conducted for the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 56 percent of respondents say the U.S. government carries “substantial” responsibility for the state of American COVID-19 outbreak, while just 47 percent said the same about leaders of foreign countries and 39 percent blamed the World Health Organization (WHO).

That comes after months of the Trump administration blaming both China’s government and the WHO for the scale of the U.S. outbreak, which has surpassed 7 million cases and more than 209,000 deaths. Top administration officials have claimed for months that the U.S. response was hampered by China’s supposed unwillingness to share data with global health experts, as well as the WHO’s alleged deference to Chinese authorities.

Blame for foreign countries and the WHO is much more popular among GOP voters, 60 percent of whom said that substantial blame is due for leaders of foreign countries including China, while 55 percent said the same about the WHO. Just 37 percent of Democrats blamed foreign countries for the U.S.’s struggles against the virus, and even less — 27 percent — blamed the WHO.

Critics of the Trump administration’s COVID-19 response have pointed to a rise in violence and bigotry suffered by Asian Americans as evidence that the president and other officials’ attempts to link the virus to China has resulted in a rise in racial discrimination.

The AP-NORC poll surveyed 1,053 U.S. adults between Sept. 11-14, before President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE‘s own diagnosis of COVID-19 was announced last week. The poll’s margin of error is 4.1 percentage points. 

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Poll: Many Americans Blame Virus Crisis on US Government | Political News

By MATTHEW LEE, AP Diplomatic Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans blame the U.S. government instead of foreign nations for the coronavirus crisis in the United States, a rebuke to the Trump administration’s contention that China or other countries are most at fault, a new poll shows.

The poll by The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was conducted before President Donald Trump tested positive for the virus Friday and was hospitalized. Trump has downplayed the severity and impact of the pandemic in recent months.

Although many see plenty of blame to go around and there’s a wide bipartisan divide over who is responsible, 56% of Americans say the U.S. government has substantial responsibility for the situation. That compares with 47% who place that much blame on the governments of other countries and only 39% who say the same about the World Health Organization.

“It reflects a general lack of confidence in the way the government has handled the situation,” said Austin Wright of the Harris School for Public Policy.

More than 1 million people worldwide, including more than 200,000 Americans, have died of COVID-19 in the outbreak. Trump has squarely blamed the virus’ spread on China, where it originated, and an inadequate response from the WHO.

As he faces a rough reelection contest in November, Trump has steadily ramped up criticism of China for the virus and announced the U.S. would halt funding for and withdraw from the international health agency over alleged Chinese interference in its work. Critics, including public health experts, have said China bears some responsibility but have also harshly criticized Trump’s response.

The poll shows Democrats are especially likely to say the U.S. government is responsible for the situation, while many Republicans are likely to place the blame elsewhere. Among Democrats, 79% say the U.S. government has a great deal of responsibility, while 37% say that about other countries’ governments and 27% about the WHO. Among Republicans, 38% say the U.S. government is responsible, compared with 60% for the governments of other countries and 55% the WHO.

Self-described conservative Republican Ralph Martinez, a 67-year-old grocery store manager from the Fort Worth, Texas area, said he wasn’t sure that any government could have handled it better and dismissed criticism that Trump had downplayed the matter.

“It’s an open question, honestly,” he said. “I don’t care who’s in office, I think they’re going to do their best for everyone. But how much can they do?”

Martinez, who said he had to throw a customer out of his store for not wearing a mask recently, lauded Trump for not wanting to create panic in the early stages of the outbreak in the U.S. He also recalled unprecedented runs on items such as toilet paper and paper towels when people realized the virus was not a momentary phenomenon.

“You would not believe how crazy these people got,” he said. “I can’t imagine how bad it would have been

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Harvard poll shows voters receptive to law and order messaging

A new poll from Harvard University suggests the American electorate is receptive to President Trump’s messaging about law and order.

More than two-thirds of the 1,314 registered voters surveyed by the Harvard Center for American Political Studies/Harris Poll have a favorable opinion of law enforcement, compared with 51% for the Black Lives Matter movement.

The two have found themselves increasingly at odds this year after the death of George Floyd, a Black man being detained by a White Minneapolis police officer. Caught on video, Floyd’s death sparked nationwide protests and occasional violence, spurring harsh rhetoric from the White House.

Antifa — a loosely-knit movement opposing right-wing ideologies that has been a frequent talking point for the president — has just 14% approval.

TRUMP ACCUSES BIDEN OF BEING WEAK ON CRIME: ‘WE BELIEVE IN LAW AND ORDER AND YOU DON’T’

Approximately three-quarters of survey respondents want to see the southern border of the U.S. tightened and illegal immigrants who commit crimes deported.

While each of those positions, on which participants were questioned from Sept. 22 to Sept. 24, more closely aligns with the president rather than 2020 Democratic opponent Joe Biden, voters give a higher overall approval rating to the former vice president.

According to reporting from The Washington Times, Biden leads the president by 6 percentage points, with 44% saying they find him personally likable and 38% disliking him.

President Trump has a 22-percentage-point deficit, with just 33% saying they like him personally.

As many national polls show, Biden has maintained a slight lead over the president through this point in the campaign.

The Harvard poll revealed a 47% to 45% edge for Biden, and when undecided voters were pressed, his lead expanded to 52% versus 48%.

The Real Clear Politics Average, which included these results in its calculation, currently shows Biden up by over seven percentage points.

Harvard cautioned, however, that 21% of voters conceded they might still change their minds come November.

President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden during the first presidential debate on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, Pool)

President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden during the first presidential debate on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, Pool)
(Associated Press)

While the president’s job approval is rising, Biden still leads on coronavirus — rated the most important issue. That figure may change after Trump’s disclosure early Friday that he and the first lady have tested positive for COVID-19.

The Harvard poll showed Trump’s approval on handling the COVID-19 pandemic began to tick up from 43% in August to 47% at the end of last month.

Nevertheless, voters polled said they expected a second wave of COVID-19 cases, and 60% said they would support another lockdown if the virus spikes again.

Two-thirds worry about reopening American businesses too soon, though most still want their states to try to remain unrestricted.

More than three-quarters of respondents want to see a national mask mandate, as the Democratic candidate had previously suggested.

Voters also voiced their support for another pandemic stimulus bill, though talks on Capitol Hill have run hot and cold over the past couple

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Harvard poll finds Americans receptive to law-and-order message

Voters want to see immigrants with criminal records deported, want to see rioters and looters arrested and prosecuted, and want to see stiffer border security, according to a new Harvard CAPS-Harris poll that suggests there’s ample room for President Trump to sell his law-and-order message — if he can break through questions about his character.

More than two-thirds hold a favorable opinion of police, compared to 51% for the Black Lives Matter movement. Antifa, the left-wing “ant-fascist” movement, has just 14% approval.

Voters also expect a second wave of coronavirus cases, but most still want their states to try to remain open anyway, rather than return to the crippling lockdowns of the spring, the poll found.

“Trump wins the issue vote, Biden wins on character,” the pollsters said, summing up the results of the survey of 1,314 registered voters, taken Sept. 22-24.

On the border, 72% said it needs to be tightened, versus just 28% who want it loosened. And 73% say illegal immigrants who commit crimes should be deported, versus 27% who think they should stay.

Four in five voters say those committing mayhem during protests should face arrest and prosecution, while 20% want they “released without much penalty.”

And just 18% think taxes should be raised, compared to 40% who want them lowered.

Overall, the mood of the country is improving. Most still think the U.S. is on the wrong track, but the gap is narrowing, as is pessimism over the economy.

Democratic presidential nominee Joseph R. Biden is winning the head-to-head match-up with Mr. Trump, 47-45, among likely voters, and holds a lead among the 9% undecided, too.

A larger share of Biden backers, though, are voting against Mr. Trump, rather than enthused about Mr. Biden.

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Britons Would Pay More Tax for a Fairer, More Equal Society Post-COVID-19: Poll

By Emma Batha

LONDON, Sept 30 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Britons would be happy to pay higher taxes for a fairer, more caring and gender-equal society as the coronavirus pandemic transforms people’s views about the world they want to live in, economists said on Wednesday.

In a major report to be presented to parliamentarians, regional governments, and business leaders, they laid out a radical roadmap for building a “caring economy” that puts people and the planet first.

“This is an idea whose time has come,” said Mary-Ann Stephenson, director of feminist think-tank the Women’s Budget Group, which published the report.

“People don’t want to return to business as usual. We’re calling for a fundamental change in the way we approach the economy. It’s about a vision for doing things differently,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

At the heart of the new economy is a recognition of society’s reliance on paid and unpaid care work — most of which is done by women — and the need to distribute this equally.

Proposals include introducing free social care, free childcare, equal sharing of parental leave, a fairer minimum wage, a universal basic income for retired people, and reducing the working week to about 30 hours.

Stephenson said the pandemic could be a catalyst for reform in the same way as Britain’s welfare system was introduced after World War Two.

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The transformation could be funded by major changes to the taxation system and borrowing, she added.

Stephenson said the pandemic had brought into stark relief the importance of care work to the economy — both paid and unpaid.

Women do 60% more unpaid work than men, reducing their time for paid employment, impacting their earnings, and leaving them poorer in old age, she said.

A poll published by the Women’s Budget Group showed men, as well as women, overwhelmingly agreed a better balance was needed between paid work, caring responsibilities, and free time.

Three quarters of respondents thought economic equality between women and men was the mark of a good society.

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Four in five respondents — including three-quarters of men — agreed women and men should equally share caring for children, older and disabled relatives, with most saying the government should financially support men to provide more care.

“The way things work at the moment they don’t work for women, but they don’t work for men either,” Stephenson said. “Just as women need some time free from care, men need time to care.”

The survey of more than 2,000 people also showed a significant majority would be willing to pay more tax to support secure jobs for everyone, a pay rise for key workers, green transport, and affordable housing. 

Reporting by Emma Batha @emmabatha; Editing by Helen Popper; Please credit

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