Tag: PROFESSION

Society condemns ‘special tax on legal profession’ | News

Government plans for a levy to fund the fight against financial crime amount to a ‘special tax on the legal profession’, the Law Society said today. In a strongly-worded response to a consultation on the economic crime levy announced by the chancellor earlier this year, Chancery Lane said any levy based on income would be especially harmful to the profession.

‘The legal profession is fully committed to supporting the fight against economic crime and takes anti-money laundering responsibilities very seriously,’ outgoing Law Society president Simon Davis said. ‘Law firms already play an important role in tackling money laundering, as demonstrated by the substantial costs and resources allocated by the profession to comply with its anti-money laundering (AML) and financial crime obligations.’

He noted that further increasing the cost of doing business would hit the international competitiveness of the legal sector and the willingness of law firms to invest in the UK.

‘With the UK in recession, the predicted future state of the economy being so uncertain and the legal sector already struggling in so many areas, imposing a tax on the profession is an unjustified step too far,’ Davis said. 

The Treasury has proposed that the economic crime levy, designed to collected £100m a year, be imposed from 2022/23. It is based on the idea that the costs of further action to tackle money laundering should not be borne solely by the general taxpayer but rather by a ‘joint public-private partnership’. Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced in his March budget that firms already in the ambit of money-laundering regulations should be required to pay. This would potentially affect 90,000 businesses, including many legal practices.

The consultation, on the design principles of the levy, proposed that ‘revenue from UK business should form the basis of the levy calculation’. The Law Society disagrees, saying that if the levy goes ahead it should be calculated according to the number of suspicious activity reports (SARs) that a firm submitted the previous year. This would be ‘simple, cheaper and fairer than a revenue-based levy’. However the consultation document argued that this method of calculation could incentivise non-reporting and entrench poor reporting behaviour.  

The consultation closed yesterday. The Treasury said it would announce further steps in due course.

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION …

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers ( ASID ) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology, infrastructure, resources and support. Focus group participants reported different degrees of preparedness, with some undergoing a seamless transition and others facing a longer adjustment. Designers also navigated transitioning clients to a virtual working relationship. 

Designers collaborated to

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION IN NEW RESILIENCY REPORT

In Partnership with Design Leaders Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald, Research Demonstrates the Effects of COVID-19 on Design Professionals and Spaces

Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology,

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