Tag: Professor

Harvard Medical School Renames Academic Society After First Black Tenured Professor


Harvard Medical School Dean George Q. Daley has approved renaming the school’s Holmes Society in honor of physician-scientist William Augustus Hinton, the first Black tenured professor at Harvard, The Harvard Crimson reported.

Two medical students had started a petition to rename the Holmes Society earlier in 2020, accruing more than 1,000 signatures.

A task force of students and faculty chose Hinton as the new namesake.

“The quality that stood out about Professor Hinton, that I think really moved us towards his selection, was that he openly admitted his humanity,” Advisory Dean and Director of the Hinton Society Anthony V. D’Amico said. “There are times when people fail, and we saw one of his qualities is that he would fall in terms of his research or clinical practice, or in terms of his science, and he wouldn’t give up. And I think that that kind of tenacity and fortitude, courage, that students want to be reminded of.”

The Holmes Society – one of five academic societies at the school – was named after Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., former dean of Harvard Medical School.

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Harvard Medical Society Renamed in Honor of First Black Tenured Professor, Physician-Scientist Hinton | News

Harvard Medical School Dean George Q. Daley approved renaming the school’s Holmes Society in honor of physician-scientist William Augustus Hinton, Class of 1905, the first Black tenured professor at Harvard.

HMS and Harvard School of Dental Medicine students are assigned to one of five academic societies upon entering the schools. Until now, the Holmes Society bore the name of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Class of 1829, a writer, physician, and former Dean of Harvard Medical School.

Holmes was one of the first American intellectuals to promote the racist doctrine of eugenics. In 1850, he revoked the acceptances of the Medical School’s first three Black students, writing that the “intermixing of the white and black races in their lecture rooms is distasteful to a large portion of the class and injurious to the interests of the school.”

Hinton — a 1905 graduate of the College and later HMS — specialized in the fields of bacteriology and immunology. He created a new diagnostic blood test for syphilis, one the U.S. Public Health Service later adopted.

Earlier this year, two medical students launched a petition to rename the former Holmes Society due to Holmes’s support of eugenics and racism towards Black and Indigenous people. The petition garnered over 1000 signatures from HMS and HSDM faculty, administrators, students, and alumni.

A Faculty Council Subcommittee on Artwork and Cultural Representations task force composed of students and faculty drafted a set of qualities they hoped the society’s new namesake would embody. The task force members then identified individuals who might best match those ideals, which led to Hinton’s selection.

“The quality that stood out about Professor Hinton, that I think really moved us towards his selection, was that he openly admitted his humanity,” Advisory Dean and Director of the Hinton Society Anthony V. D’Amico said. “There are times when people fail, and we saw one of his qualities is that he would fall in terms of his research or clinical practice, or in terms of his science, and he wouldn’t give up. And I think that that kind of tenacity and fortitude, courage, that students want to be reminded of.”

LaShyra T. Nolen, the author of the petition and Class of 2023 HMS student council president, said while the renaming of the academic society does not constitute an end to the conversation surrounding anti-racism at Harvard, this change makes clear that racist symbols or figures “are no longer going to be part of our DNA.”

Jalen A. Benson, the creator of the petition and a member of the Hinton Society, said as a Black student he finds it “so powerful to see that excellence will be rewarded, excellence will be recognized,” even if not during Hinton’s lifetime.

“Hinton wasn’t allowed to be a surgeon as he wanted to be, they wouldn’t take him on at Mass General,” Benson said. “So to see Harvard recognize contributions from people of color, especially Black people, means so much to me, because I can look and say I’m proud to

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Iran university professor and government advisor says ‘ordinary Iranians’ are praying for Trump’s recovery

In the days since President Donald Trump was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus and subsequently transferred to the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), one Tehran-based sociology professor has taken to social media to depict the “two groups” of Iranians “praying” for the infected commander in chief.

“It is not surprising that Donald Trump has been hospitalized for coronavirus; anyone, including the president of any country, can get sick. But it is very strange that those in Iran, among the people whose lives have suffered the most since Trump’s presidency, wish him well,” wrote Mohammad Fazeli, an Iranian sociologist and assistant professor at Tehran’s Shahid Beheshti University, who is also reported to serve as an advisor to the Iranian Minister of Energy and is the deputy director of the Research Center of the Presidential Office, in an Instagram post over the weekend. “I have seen people wishing Trump was released from the hospital safe and sound since morning.”

In his post, Fazeli depicted two distinct groups of Iranians turning to divine intervention to propel the president’s recovery.

“The first group of Trump praying people are often ordinary people who think that although the Trump presidency and the return of sanctions and maximum pressure have caused terrible damage to the Iranian economy and made life difficult for the people, there is no hope for reform inside,” he explained. “Except for external pressure. The economic fundamentals, rethinking governance practices, and turning away from wrong paths.”

POMPEO: U.S.’ FULLY PREPARED’ AGAINST ‘MALIGN ACTORS’ AS TRUMP BATTLES CORONAVIRUS

As for the second group of “Trump health praisers,” Fazeli characterized them as Iranians “who think that his possible death from Corona will increase Joe Biden’s chances of victory, and the opening up of the economic situation and even the psychological impact of this victory will improve the situation of Hassan Rouhani’s administration, and this is not what they like.

“This situation raises a big question for our rulers. The rulers should think about what they have done to bring the first group of worshippers to the point where they hope to exert pressure from their enemies in order to find an opening in their present life and future prospects,” Fazeli surmised. “The second group of Trump health advocates is afraid that his death will lead to an opening in the government and improve its image.”

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani adjusts his face mask in a meeting of the national headquarters of the fight against the COVID-19, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 18, 2020. He estimated as many as 25 million Iranians could have been infected with the coronavirus since the outbreak's beginning, citing an Iranian Health Ministry study that has so far not been made public, the state-run IRNA news agency reported. Writing in Farsi at top right reads, "The Presidency." (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani adjusts his face mask in a meeting of the national headquarters of the fight against the COVID-19, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 18, 2020. He estimated as many as 25 million Iranians could have been infected with the coronavirus since the outbreak’s beginning, citing an Iranian Health Ministry study that has so far not been made public, the state-run IRNA news agency reported. Writing in Farsi at top right reads, “The Presidency.” (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)

SPOTLIGHT ON WALTER REED MEDICAL CENTER BRINGS BACK POWERFUL MEMORIES FOR US WOUNDED WARRIORS

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the Sydney professor under attack from Poland’s ruling party

Video: Activists fear abortion decision could be revisited by conservative Supreme Court (Sky News Australia)

Activists fear abortion decision could be revisited by conservative Supreme Court

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Wojciech Sadurski does not immediately seem like a danger to a foreign government. By day the internationally renowned legal scholar is Challis chair of jurisprudence at the University of Sydney. By night he posts videos on YouTube of his other passion – playing drums on jazz standards.

But the 70-year-old professor has had to pay attention to a more disturbing drumbeat since the ruling party and public broadcaster of his home country, Poland, sued him for defamation over tweets accusing them separately of indulging far-right nationalists and harassing the government’s political opponents.

On Friday Sadurski was due to be cross-examined remotely from a Warsaw courtroom, in the first hearing of one of three cases against him that have added to the alarm in international legal circles and Poland’s fellow EU members about the rightwing Law and Justice party’s increasingly brazen assault on the independence of the judiciary.

Related: In Poland we’ve become spectators at the dismantling of democracy | Karolina Wigura and Jarosław Kuisz

Legal academics from around the world have rallied in defence of Sadurski under the hashtag #withwoj, with hundreds signing an open letter calling the suits a “coordinated harassment campaign … against a well-known and respected academic who has clearly struck a nerve with his powerful critique of the situation in his native country”.

Sadurski’s case was initially sparked by controversy over the annual commemoration of Polish independence on 11 November, which has increasingly become dominated by extreme nationalists. The day before the 2018 event marking the centenary of the modern Polish state, where president Andrzej Duda awkwardly combined an official event with the march organised by the far right, Sadurski tweeted that “no honest person” should attend, and referred to Law and Justice (PiS in Polish) as “an organised criminal group” colluding with neo-Nazis.



Agata Kornhauser-Duda, Andrzej Duda standing in front of a crowd: Poland’s president, Andrzej Duda, speaks at the controversial march in Warsaw on 11 November 2018, which marked the centenary of Poland regaining its independence. Photograph: Czarek Sokołowski/AP


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Poland’s president, Andrzej Duda, speaks at the controversial march in Warsaw on 11 November 2018, which marked the centenary of Poland regaining its independence. Photograph: Czarek Sokołowski/AP

Two months later he also incurred the wrath of the country’s public broadcaster, TVP, following the assassination of the liberal mayor of Gdansk, Paweł Adamowicz. Sadurski accused governmental media on Twitter of hounding Adamowicz over his views, referring to “Goebbelsian” behaviour, but without naming TVP. Nevertheless, it took out both a civil and criminal suit for defamation, alleging his tweet amounted to a claim that it had incited the murder. Conviction in the criminal case – which will now be heard in December after Friday’s hearing was postponed – carries a maximum 12-month jail sentence and heavy financial penalties.

Sadurski, who first came to Australia in 1981 and has dual citizenship, is a regular commentator in the Polish media and well known in legal circles there. He is unapologetic about his statements, saying: “People who don’t watch Polish public

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UCI law professor says undercover policing creates criminals

Undercover police stings aren’t effective at combating crime rates and create criminals out of people who possibly wouldn’t otherwise commit crimes, according to a new article by a UC Irvine law professor.

In “The Dangers of Police-Created Crime,” Katie Tinto describes how undercover policing has evolved from focusing on larger crimes to low-level offenses, which tends to “ensnare” vulnerable people.

“Is this effective and cost efficient policing?” Tinto said in a phone interview. “We suggest the answer is no, that we are actually creating criminals. It’s not at all clear that these individuals would commit these crimes were it not for undercover police officers presenting the opportunity.”

Tinto said that rather than targeting high-level drug kingpins, officers are more likely to run a sting operation on vulnerable individuals like a homeless drug addict on Skid Row.

Undercover policing was born of the idea that some criminals are very hard to catch, whether that be a politician taking bribes, or somebody high up in a drug network. Yet, the approach has been “watered down,” Tinto said.

Rather than targeting these high-level criminals, police tend to go after people from vulnerable populations, like homeless people or drug addicts.

“When you approach someone who is drug addicted or down on their luck or recently out of prison or needs money and you offer them a tempting thing, people say yes,” Tinto said.

“They are not going into the private law firm and being like, who wants to buy coke?”

Tinto partnered with the nonprofit Justice Collaborative Institute for the article.

“Inviting people to commit crimes is fundamentally at odds with what we expect police to do, which is to focus on credible and serious public safety concerns,” said Dawn Milam, senior legal counsel for the Justice Collaborative Institute. “Firefighters do not start fires just to extinguish them, and police officers shouldn’t lure desperate people into breaking the law just to arrest them.

Tinto said this type of policing doesn’t have any meaningful impact on crime rates and puts these vulnerable, low-level offenders in jail for long periods of time.

The financial cost is significant, especially during the pandemic economy. Taxpayers end up footing the bill for the costly sting operations and long-term jail sentences.

Tinto said because the undercover policing doesn’t primarily target high-level criminals, law enforcement isn’t going after the root cause of the crime.

“Spending all that money doesn’t make us safer,” Tinto said.

Law enforcement agencies use undercover police stings because it’s an easy method to make arrests and get convictions, Tinto said. It’s a way to boost the numbers.

To the layman, entrapment would seem to be a rock solid defense against being talked into a crime by a police officer.

But that’s not the case.

“Entrapment is a very limited defense,” Tinto said.

The suspect has to show that they weren’t predisposed to saying yes to the crime offered by the undercover officer. Tinto said that under most legal standards, somebody is considered “predisposed” if they have a

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RIT Professor Scott Franklin named American Physical Society Fellow

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IMAGE: Rochester Institute of Technology Professor Scott Franklin
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Rochester Institute of Technology Professor Scott Franklin has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).

Franklin, a professor in the School of Physics and Astronomy and director of RIT’s Center for Advancing STEM Teaching, Learning and Education (CASTLE), was elected upon the recommendation of the APS Forum on Education (FEd). In the society’s citation, he was praised “For decades of work to support emerging and diverse scholars in physics education research and to foster a vibrant and sustained PER community.” The fellowship is a selective and prestigious recognition by peers for outstanding contributions to physics.

“I’m tremendously honored and humbled,” said Franklin. “The award recognizes the truly collaborative nature of the community building activities. In each of the activities that this recognizes, I’ve had the great fortune to partner with really wonderful collaborators. So, while I’m honored to receive this award, I also have to recognize the many, many collaborators who contributed as much as I did, and I’m thankful and grateful to them for all that they have given me.”

Franklin leads research groups in granular materials as well as physics education research (PER), has been principal investigator or co-PI on 17 funded projects exceeding $4 million in total, and has more than 40 peer-reviewed papers and textbooks. Throughout more than 20 years of physics education research, Franklin has prioritized community building and the development of emerging scholars.

At a time when physics education researchers had very few publication outlets, he was a founding editor (2001-2004) of the Physics Education Research Conference proceedings, and organizer of the 2001 joint American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Education Research Conference in Rochester, N.Y. He also co-leads an international training program for emerging education researchers in STEM known as Professional-development for Emerging Education Researchers (PEER), and is a founder of RIT’s multidisciplinary STEM education research group. He served as the first Treasurer of the APS Topical Group on PER from 2014-18.

Within physics education research, Franklin co-developed the Explorations in Physics curriculum and has studied students’ reasoning, metacognition, and use of mathematics in physics. His zeal for promoting emerging scholars has connected with efforts to broaden participation in physics and STEM. Together with other College of Science faculty, Franklin leads the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Inclusive Excellence program at RIT and strives to broaden higher education to better serve women, people of color, and other marginalized groups.

“The RIT community is extremely proud of Scott for receiving this terrific honor,” said Sophia Maggelakis, dean of the College of Science. “His induction is a testament to the quality of his research, his leadership and the respect he has earned from his peers.”

Franklin is the third scientist at RIT to be named a fellow of the society. Professor Manuela Campanelli, director of RIT’s Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, was elected in 2009 and Professor Carlos Lousto was elected in 2012.

“This recognition is very well deserved,” said

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Professor Bates Gill joins Asia Society Australia as the Scholar-In-Residence under a new partnership with Macquarie University

1 October 2020

Asia Society Australia and Macquarie University have today announced the appointment of Dr Bates Gill, political analyst, scholar of China, and author and Professor of Asia-Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University as the inaugural Scholar-in-Residence.

The Scholar-in-Residence Program is a new initiative that will appoint leading thinkers to Asia Society Australia to provide analysis on the critical issues facing Australia in Asia, engage with Australian business and government and contribute to Asia Society programs and publications.

In partnership with Macquarie University, Professor Gill will take up his new appointment on 1 October. Bates is an expert on Chinese foreign policy with a long record of research and publications on international and regional security issues. He is the former CEO of the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney and a former Director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Bates was also the co-editor of Asia Society Australia Disruptive Asia Special China Edition in 2019. Currently, his work focuses on Chinese foreign and security policy, US-China relations, and the US role in Asia.

Under the Program, a residency at Asia Society Australia will be awarded annually to one established scholar with expertise in Asian studies, foreign policy, international security, trade and economics.

Professor Bates Gill, the inaugural Scholar and Professor of Asia-Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University said:

“The Asia Society is a remarkable global organisation, exemplified by its team at the Asia Society Australia.  This appointment is an honour and pleasure, and I look forward to working with Asia Society colleagues in putting forward fresh policy insights and ideas for navigating Australia’s relations with our Asian neighbours.”

Professor Martina Mollering, Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts, Macquarie University added:

“Macquarie University is delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Bates Gill from the Faculty of Arts, as the Asia Society Australia’s inaugural Scholar-in-Residence. This partnership between the Asia Society Australia and Macquarie is making a purposeful contribution to Australians’ understanding of the political, economic and social dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region during this turbulent period.”

Nicole Brigg, Pro Vice-Chancellor (International), Macquarie University noted:

“The Asia Society Australia is an outstanding advocate for deepening and broadening Australia’s knowledge, insight and understanding of our Asian neighbours.  Macquarie University is delighted to contribute to this valuable work through the appointment of Professor Bates Gill from the Faculty of Arts, as the Asia Society Australia’s inaugural Scholar-in-Residence.”

Philipp Ivanov, CEO of Asia Society Australia said:

“The Scholar-in-Residence Program will further enhance Asia Society Australia’s expertise and capabilities, following the launch of Asia Society Policy Institute in Australia earlier this year. It will also contribute to greater collaboration between Australian academia, business and government on evolving foreign and economic policies towards our region.”

To launch the residency and to coincide with the National Day of the People’s Republic of China, Professor Bates Gill has written an opinion piece in the Australian Financial Review which presents an analysis of the key foreign policy objectives under President Xi in the coming decade and

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