Tag: protest

Polish farmers protest planned animal welfare law

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What does Colorado law say about Denver protest shooting suspect’s self-defense claim?

Whether the security guard who shot and killed a Denver demonstrator over the weekend will be able to successfully argue in court that he acted in self-defense will depend on the particular nuances of the case, Colorado legal experts said Monday.

Doug Richards, who is working with the family of Matthew Robert Dolloff, 30, called the shooting tragic Monday, and said that Dolloff fired only when he was attacked. Dolloff shot and killed Lee Keltner, 49, toward the end of two opposing demonstrations downtown, with one billed as a “Patriot Rally” and the other a “BLM-Antifa Soup Drive.”

“This was a very clear case of Matt acting in self-defense,” Richards said.

Dolloff has not yet been charged by prosecutors but is being held by police on suspicion of first-degree murder.

Under Colorado law, someone can use deadly force in self-defense only if that person reasonably thinks using less force won’t be sufficient, and the person reasonably believes he or someone else faces an immediate threat of being killed or seriously hurt.

There is no duty to retreat under state law, but the action taken in self-defense must be generally proportionate to the attack, attorneys said.

“The way I used to explain it to juries is there are two fundamental components of self-defense,” said Stan Garnett, former district attorney in Boulder County. “The first one is the perception of the person involved in it — what did they reasonably believe was happening? And the second provision is proportionality. Did they respond in a manner that was appropriate and proportionate?”

“If someone comes at you and they are going to punch you, you can’t take out a gun and shoot them,” said attorney Jacob Kartchner. “The amount of self-defense needs to be requisite with the threat presented against you.”

Keltner’s family told The Denver Post he went downtown Sunday to support law enforcement. Toward the end of the rallies, he got into a confrontation with Dolloff — it’s not clear how it started, but photos taken by a Post photographer show at one point Keltner appears to have slapped Dolloff in the face, then the two men stepped back from one another. Keltner pulled out a can of pepper spray and fired it toward Dolloff, who Keltner shot from a few feet away, according to the photos.

Whether Dolloff’s decision to fire was reasonable will depend on myriad factors, attorneys said, such as his state of mind, what words were exchanged and whether he knew Keltner was armed with pepper spray or thought he may have had a gun.

Dolloff was working as a contracted security guard for 9News when he killed Keltner, though city officials say he was not licensed for such work in Denver.

Under state law, Dolloff also can’t claim self-defense if he started the confrontation, unless he tried to end it and communicated that to Keltner, and Keltner nevertheless attacked again, attorneys said.

All of those factors will be part of the determining whether Dolloff held reasonable beliefs

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Thai Government Says ‘Can Handle’ Student-Led Protest | World News

BANGKOK (Reuters) – The Thai government said on Monday it was not concerned about a student-led demonstration on Wednesday as protest leaders sought to escalate their push to demand a new constitution and oust Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha.

During three months of protests, anti-government activists have also broken a taboo by calling for reforms of the powerful monarchy of King Maha Vajiralongkorn, who is “enthroned in a position of revered worship” according to the constitution.

Protesters, who drew tens of thousands of people to a demonstration last month, said they planned to gather on Wednesday at Bangkok’s Democracy Monument before moving to Government House and would camp there overnight.

Deputy Prime Minister Prawit Wongsuwan told reporters that he did not expect huge turnout.

“We’re prepared and not worried,” he said. “I think we can handle it.”

The protest leaders, organising under the new banner of the People’s Movement, said their focus would be a call for constitutional changes before a parliament sitting on Nov. 1.

“We also want to oust Prayuth,” said Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, one of the leaders, adding that she expected even more people than at last month’s protest in Bangkok.

Protesters say the constitution was engineered to ensure that Prayuth, who first seized power in a 2014 coup, continued in office after an election last year. He says the election was fair.

Some protesters also want a reduction in the king’s powers to reflect Thailand’s status as a constitutional monarchy.

Raising the prospect of an encounter between the king and the protesters, his motorcade is due to pass Democracy Monument on Wednesday as he presides over a ceremony at a royal temple during a rare visit to Thailand.

Police said they would urge protesters to choose another location or at least clear the way for the motorcade.

Arnon Nampa, another of the protest leaders, said last week that demonstrators would not obstruct the motorcade but would show a three-finger salute – a symbol of resistance – if it passed by.

(Writing by Patpicha Tanakasempipat; Editing by Matthew Tostevin)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Trump Was ‘Pandering’ to Black and Latinx Voters in ‘Law and Order’ Protest: Fox Host Arthel Neville

President Donald Trump was “pandering” to Black and Latinx Americans during his White House speech on Saturday in a bid to get their votes just weeks before the election, Fox News anchor Arthel Neville told viewers.

The president stood on a balcony to address several hundred supporters gathered on the South Lawn on Saturday afternoon in his first in-person event since he revealed he had tested positive for coronavirus.

The rally was organized by Black conservative commentator Candace Owens and former Arizona police officer Brandon Tatum’s Blexit Foundation.

Touted by the White House as a “peaceful protest for law and order,” Trump told the crowd: “You just marched to the White House because you understand, to protect the lives of Black Americans and all Americans, you have to have your police support you.”

He also claimed Joe Biden, his Democratic rival in November’s election, had “betrayed” Black and Hispanic Americans during his time in office and that his “law and order” campaign is necessary to help them feel safe.

Analyzing the event on Fox, Neville noted that at 18 minutes, the speech was “really short” for the president.

She added: “The president was pandering to the Black and Latinx Americans, garnering… or wishing to garner their support this election. And he also made sure to say that he is pro-jobs, pro-workers, pro-law and order.”

A new Pew Research Center poll found Trump is trailing Biden by wide margins among Black, Hispanic and Asian voters. Biden leads Black voters by 81 percentage points, Hispanic voters by 34 points and Asian voters by 53 points, according to the results of the survey, released on Friday.

Neville also noted that there were around 500 people at the event, citing reporters on the ground, far fewer than the 2,000 guests that were reportedly invited.

Fox host Eric Shawn gave credit to the president for not coughing during the speech. “Look, most importantly he looks fine. He sounded good. He seemed in good spirits and good humor and he didn’t cough,” he noted.

“Does that image of looking like his normal self go a long way in this campaign?” Shawn asked the network’s guests.

Brad Blakeman, who was an advisor to former President George W. Bush, replied: “You bet it does. And it also shows that the president is leading by example.”

Blakeman claimed Trump’ case showed the “survivability of the virus” shouldn’t prevent people from living their lives.

“To think that we’re going to shut down our country, shut down our lives. The president is right. The cure is worse than the disease if we allow ourselves not to be able to live life,” he added.

But at this point, Shawn called Trump “a coronavirus president” and noted that the public did not know the results of the president’s latest test. In a memo released on Saturday night by the White House, Dr. Sean Conley said Trump was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, but did not say explicitly whether he had

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Trump gives in-person remarks at ‘peaceful protest for Law & Order’

President Trump will speak in-person Saturday on the South Lawn of the White House in what the administration is characterizing as a “peaceful protest” for law and order.

The president will make his remarks at 2 p.m. ET, and the event marks the first in-person event for both Trump and first lady Melania Trump since they tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 1.

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Trump to Go Ahead With ‘Law and Order’ Protest Amid D.C. Mayor’s Ban on ‘Mass Gatherings’

President Donald Trump is expected to give in-person remarks during an event today on the South Lawn of the White House, despite his coronavirus diagnosis and restrictions on mass gatherings that remain in effect for Washington, D.C.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.


© Win McNamee/Getty
President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.

The president’s schedule for today suggests that he will deliver “remarks at a peaceful protest for law and order” at 2 p.m., confirming the ABC News report yesterday which said Trump was expected to address attendees from a White House balcony.

‘Get Out There’: Trump Removes Face Mask For Photo Op As He Returns To White House

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If it goes ahead, it will mark the president’s first in-person event since announcing last Friday that he and the First Lady had both tested positive for COVID-19.

Trump spent three nights at Walter Reed Medical Center, returning to the White House on Monday while appearing to have labored breathing. He has since released video statements, including one which touted his treatment as a possible cure.

Under medical care, the president was reportedly administered antiviral drug remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone and an unproven experimental drug from Regeneron. He said on Twitter yesterday a “big rally” was scheduled for Florida on Monday.

According to CNBC, all attendees at today’s event will be asked to wear face masks on White House grounds and will undertake a temperature check and brief questionnaire. It was not immediately clear how many people were expected to take part.

Under Phase Two of Washington, DC’s COVID-19 restrictions, which are still in effect, mass gatherings of more than 50 people in a single location are prohibited.

“If shouting or singing is involved, these activities can create droplets that may spread the virus that causes COVID-19 if you are infected. To prevent this, wear a facemask and find alternative ways to voice your message, such as through holding signs and using noise makers,” explain the guidelines from D.C.’s Mayor, Muriel Bowser.

The White House event today comes after a string of Trump administration officials who attended a previous gathering in the Rose Garden on September 26 tested positive for the disease, described as a “superspreader” event by top scientist Anthony Fauci.

On Thursday, D.C. health officials urged anyone who had worked in the White House in the past two weeks to contact local health agencies for guidance about their “potential need to quarantine,” noting there had been “limited contact tracing.”

Despite health concerns, the president’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, claimed in

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Thailand’s Next Protest Could Draw 100,000, Anti-Government Group Says

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a group of people in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Students make the three-fingered salute as they stand behind the gate of Samsen school to demand for less strict school rules, more tolerance and respect during a protest in Bangkok on October 2, 2020


© Photographer: MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP
Students make the three-fingered salute as they stand behind the gate of Samsen school to demand for less strict school rules, more tolerance and respect during a protest in Bangkok on October 2, 2020

A planned anti-government protest in Bangkok next week is set to draw some 100,000 people, or twice as many participants as a demonstration last month, according to organizers.

The gathering scheduled for Oct. 14 will call on the government to resign and the monarchy to be reformed, said Arnon Nampa, a lawyer and leading figure in the campaign.

“People who want any or all of these changes should join the movement,” Arnon said at a briefing in Bangkok on Thursday. “We’re looking to increase pressure on the government.”

Thailand’s political risk is back in focus following a series of protests that started mid-July, adding to challenges faced by Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-Ocha’s government. The economy is headed for its worst ever full-year contraction and year-to-date foreign fund withdrawals from the equity market now exceed a record annual exodus set in 2018.

Read: Thailand’s Political Tensions Seep Into Equities: Taking Stock

Prayuth has said protesters are allowed to gather as long as they follow the law, and that he doesn’t want the movement to escalate because it’s “not good” for the country, according to government spokesman Anucha Burapachaisri.

The protest organizers, representing several youth-led groups, plan to hold their gathering at Democracy Monument, a symbol of Thailand’s transition to constitutional monarchy following a 1932 coup. Thailand has since had about 20 successful putsches, the most recent led by former army chief Prayuth who now heads an elected government.

(Updates with comment from government spokesman in penultimate paragraph.)

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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Thousands protest against ‘omnibus law’ on jobs

Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets across Indonesia since Tuesday
Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets across Indonesia since Tuesday

Workers in Indonesia are protesting for the third straight day after a new job creation law was passed this week.

Thousands have taken part in strikes and demonstrations in several cities, with hundreds detained by the police.

Protesters are worried that the so-called “omnibus law” will hurt both workers and the environment.

But the government says the changes are needed to help its economy which has been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Demonstrations have gathered steam in the capital Jakarta and other cities such as Bandung on Wednesday and Thursday, after relatively peaceful protests earlier in the week.

Indonesian police detained at least 400 protesters, including some who were allegedly armed with molotov cocktails and sharp weapons.

The bill, which is over 1,000 pages long and amends 79 existing laws, was passed on Monday with the support of seven out of nine parties.

Why enact the law?

The bill is aimed at relaxing Indonesia’s complex web of business, labour and environmental laws in an attempt to attract investment and stimulate the economy.

In an interview in January, President Joko Widodo told the BBC that the law is about removing red tape and opening the economy to more foreign investment.

“We want to simplify the licensing and bureaucracy (process), we want speed, so a harmonisation of law is needed to create speedy services, speedy policymaking, so that Indonesia would be faster to respond to every world change,” he said.

Indonesia’s economy, which is the largest in South East Asia, shrank by 5.3% in the second quarter of this year.

What does the law do?

In addition to removing red tape, the bill makes significant changes to Indonesia’s labour regulations.

It abolishes the sectoral minimum wage, in favour of minimums set by regional governors.

It will reduce severance pay to a maximum of 19 months salary, depending on how long the employee has had the job. Previously the maximum was 32 months pay.

However, a new government fund will provide an additional six months pay to the newly unemployed.

Allowable overtime will be increased to a maximum of four hours in one day and 18 hours a week. Businesses will only be required to give workers one day off a week instead of two.

Restrictions on outsourcing have also been reduced, as have restrictions on the jobs in which expatriates can work.

The law also relaxes environmental standards, only forcing businesses to file an environmental impact analysis if their projects are considered high risk.

By Callistasia Wijaya

BBC News Indonesia

The so-called “omnibus law” is expected to create nearly three millions of jobs for young people who start looking for jobs and six million people who have lost jobs because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

While Indonesia’s ranking in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business index has significantly improved in the past five years, it remained stagnant at 73rd in 2019.

It lags behind Vietnam and it

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Why thousands of labor activists protest Indonesia Job Creation Law

Bandung and Jakarta, Indonesia

Thousands of Indonesian students and workers protested on Wednesday against a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment, with some clashing with police. 

The new Job Creation Law, which was approved Monday, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labor system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labor Law, the Spatial Planning Law, and Environmental Management Law.

It is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people. Supporters of the law say it will increase employment at a time when a recession looms and when Indonesia is competitively falling behind other Southeast Asian countries.

Seven parties in the House of Representatives approved the legislation while two others rejected it, with their members walking out of the plenary session.

The Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions, known as KSPI, said about 2 million workers representing 32 labor unions would take part in mass rallies and strikes in various cities for several days starting Tuesday.

Authorities in Bandung, the capital of West Java province, blocked streets leading to the local parliament building and city hall, where clashes between rock-throwing students and riot police broke out late Tuesday when police tried to disperse the protesters.

On Wednesday, more than 3,000 protesters, including workers and high school and university students, attempted to reach the heavily guarded parliament building. Protesters set fires to tires near blocked streets and pelted police with rocks and gasoline bombs and broke down a gate of the parliament compound. Riot police responded by firing tear gas and water cannons.

Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Jakarta’s satellite cities of Tangerang and Bekasi where large factories are located, and many cities on Sumatra and Sulawesi islands.

National Police spokesman Argo Yuwono said riot police used only tear gas and rubber bullets in dispersing the protesters. He said authorities are still investigating the violence in Bekasi in which both students and police were injured.

Mr. Yuwono urged protesters to convey their views in an orderly and good mannered way, and always wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Thousands of workers from factories in Karawang, in West Java, and Serang, in Banten province, also protested outside their factories.

Police in the capital, Jakarta, prevented labor groups from holding a mass rally in front of Parliament.

KSPI President Said Iqbal released a statement saying the new law will hurt workers, including by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labor by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly wages into hourly wages.

“We reject the entire contents of the omnibus law which is very detrimental to workers,” Mr. Iqbal said. “It must be canceled immediately. The workers are already suffering a lot from the COVID-19 crisis.”

Some academics from prominent universities also expressed disappointment on

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Thousands of students, workers protest new Indonesian law

BANDUNG, Indonesia (AP) — Thousands of Indonesian students and workers protested on Wednesday against a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment, with some clashing with police.



A labor demonstrator raises his fists in support of the protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)


© Provided by Associated Press
A labor demonstrator raises his fists in support of the protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

Authorities in Bandung, the capital of West Java province, blocked streets leading to the local parliament building and city hall, where clashes between rock-throwing students and riot police broke out late Tuesday when police tried to disperse the protesters.



Indonesian workers march during a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation, in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of Indonesian students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)


© Provided by Associated Press
Indonesian workers march during a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation, in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of Indonesian students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

On Wednesday, more than 3,000 protesters, including workers and high school and university students, attempted to reach the heavily guarded parliament building. Protesters set fires to tires near blocked streets.



Students burn a tire during a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)


© Provided by Associated Press
Students burn a tire during a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Jakarta’s satellite cities of Tangerang and Bekasi where large factories are located, and many cities on Sumatra and Sulawesi islands.

Thousands of workers from factories in West Java’s Karawang city and Serang town in Banten province also protested outside their factories.

Police in the capital, Jakarta, prevented labor groups from holding a mass rally in front of Parliament.

The new Job Creation Law, which was approved Monday, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labor system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labor Law, the Spatial Planning Law and Environmental Management Law.



Students take part in a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of Indonesian students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)


© Provided by Associated Press
Students take part in a protest against a controversial omnibus bill on job creation in Tangerang, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Thousands of Indonesian students and laborers protested on Wednesday against the new law they say cripples labor rights and harms the environment. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

It is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people.

Seven parties in the House of Representatives approved the legislation while two others rejected it, with their members walking out of the plenary session.

The Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions, known as KSPI, said about 2 million workers representing 32 labor unions would take part in mass

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