Tag: public

Tesla Beefing Up Its Public, Government Relations Teams in China

(Bloomberg) — Tesla Inc. is hiring public and government relations staff in China as the world’s biggest car market becomes a more important source of income for the top electric-vehicle maker.

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The Palo Alto, California-based company is seeking new hires in China’s large cities, as well as smaller hubs including Shijiazhuang in Hebei province near Beijing and Haikou, a port city that’s the capital of the island province of Hainan, according to a job advertisement that was confirmed by a company representative. The online ad didn’t specify how many people Tesla is looking for but the recruitment posting covers 10 cities.

The hirings are in contrast to Tesla’s media approach in the U.S., where its communications team has largely been disbanded. The company, run by billionaire Elon Musk, hasn’t responded to inquiries from Bloomberg and other media outlets for nearly a year, and many of the people who were in communications roles have moved on to jobs at other tech companies. Chief Executive Officer Musk does appear on podcasts and is an avid user of Twitter.

Tesla, which gets almost a quarter of its revenue from China versus about half from the U.S., has a factory in Shanghai where it builds Model 3s. It plans to export China-made EVs to countries including Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, as well as Europe as soon as the end of this year or early 2021, people familiar with the matter said last month.

Although China is already the world’s largest car market, the potential upside is huge. Vehicle penetration is still low and there’s a rising middle class able to afford personal transport for the first time. EVs in China are also much cheaper than in Europe and the U.S., and the Chinese consumer is more tech savvy and likely to be an early adopter.



chart: Cheap in China


© Bloomberg
Cheap in China

The position, described as a regional external relations manager, will be responsible for “establishing and maintaining a positive corporate image of Tesla in regional markets,” building contacts with media, government agencies and industry groups. Responsibilities may involve arranging media interviews for executives, conducting policy research and liaising with local governments. The ads were posted in late August.

Tesla delivered 69,514 domestically built Model 3s in the first eight months of 2020, making it the No. 1 player in China followed by BYD Co. with more than 40,000 cars, registration data show. Tesla is however facing greater competition from China’s legions of smaller EV firms, including NIO Inc., Xpeng Inc. and SAIC-GM Wuling Automobile Co., which has a an EV for less than $5,000.

Volkswagen AG’s Audi is also expanding its partnership with Chinese manufacturer FAW, saying earlier this week a memorandum of understanding was signed to start a company that will produce electric cars in China from 2024.

To boost China sales, Tesla has been rolling out price cuts, bringing the starting price of Model 3s to as low as 249,900 yuan ($36,800). People familiar have said that move has been

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On immigration, the public is far more liberal than UK government

“It’s what the public demands.” That’s always been the government’s alibi for tough immigration rules. Polls, though, have suggested that the public is more nuanced and liberal than given credit for. The latest British Social Attitudes report, on post-Brexit policy, confirms this.



text: Photograph: The Image Factory/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: The Image Factory/Alamy

Most headlines about the report have focused on the fact that two-thirds of Britons oppose freedom of movement for EU nationals. What the survey asked, however, was whether EU nationals should be treated the same as everyone else. Most people agreed they should. Two-thirds also thought that EU countries should not favour Britons over other non-EU migrants. This is, in other words, as much a demand for equal treatment as for ending freedom of movement.



text, letter: Only 13% of Brits think it should be ‘relatively difficult’ for French people to migrate to the UK; the corresponding figure for Pakistani immigrants is 29%.


© Photograph: The Image Factory/Alamy
Only 13% of Brits think it should be ‘relatively difficult’ for French people to migrate to the UK; the corresponding figure for Pakistani immigrants is 29%.

When asked how difficult it should be for immigrants to come to Britain, just 13% thought it should be “relatively difficult” for French people to migrate. For Poles and Australians, the figures were 18% and 12%, respectively. Inevitably, people were less welcoming of Pakistani immigrants, yet, just 29% thought it should be “relatively difficult” for Pakistanis to enter Britain.

The government has made much of its desire to welcome “high-skilled” workers and to restrict “low-skilled” ones. While the vast majority of the public want priority given to doctors, they also favour prioritising care workers, deemed “low skilled” by the government. Fewer than one in five want more “high-skilled” bankers. There is much opposition, too, to salary thresholds for prospective immigrants.

Public opinion is not as liberal as I would like. But it’s certainly far more so than you’d imagine from much of the debate about immigration. Or from government policy.

• Kenan Malik is an Observer columnist

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Trump returns to public events with ‘law and order’ speech at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a swift and full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump returned to public events on Saturday with a brief “law and order” speech from a White House balcony.



a man standing next to a clock: Photograph: REX/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

In a closely-watched first public appearance at a live event just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay, the president delivered an 18-minute scripted address to a crowd on the South Lawn. It had been billed as “2,000 invited guests” but in reality a gathering of about 500 mostly young flag-waving supporters, some of whom appeared to be not properly wearing masks.



Donald Trump standing in front of a building: Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.


© Photograph: REX/Shutterstock
Donald Trump removes a mask ahead of speaking from a balcony at the White House on 10 October.

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Trump was maskless during the speech, during which he appeared to show no lingering signs of coronavirus. But questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when he last tested negative for coronavirus.

Today’s lunchtime in-person event also appeared to counter his government’s own health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing as the attendees clustered together tightly in front of the balcony and cheered loudly at his remarks.

The campaign-style rally came after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away.



a group of people posing for the camera: Supporters cheer on Donald Trump during his White House event on 10 October. Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Supporters cheer on Donald Trump during his White House event on 10 October. Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters

Video: White House spokesman sidesteps question on Trump’s last negative coronavirus test (The Washington Post)

White House spokesman sidesteps question on Trump’s last negative coronavirus test

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He explored several familiar themes in his speech, attacking Democrats for an agenda he said was “beyond socialism” and promising again that the battle against Covid-19, which has claimed more than 210,000 American lives, was being won.

He also touted, with little evidence, “the fastest economic recovery in history”, and heaped praise on Black and Hispanic voters in an apparent attempt to shore up support from demographic groups that polls suggest he has been making inroads with recently.

“We’re starting very, very big with our rallies and with our everything because we cannot allow our country to become a socialist nation,” he said.

As for coronavirus: “It’s going to disappear, it is disappearing,” he added, pledging that a vaccine was coming in “record time”, and contradicting growing evidence of a new autumn surge of the virus in many states. Twice he referred to Covid-19 as “the China virus”, resurrecting a racist theming of a pandemic that has affected almost every country in the world.

Trump also praised law enforcement, and repeated again his unfounded assertions of “crooked ballots and a rigged election”.

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Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.

But after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away, the president is seizing an opportunity to try to reposition himself in the race, despite the apparent health risk to attendees from a man likely to still be contagious.

In a Friday night interview on Fox News, Trump, who was given a cocktail of antiviral drugs and strong steroids during his hospital stay, insisted he was “medication-free”.

“We pretty much finished, and now we’ll see how things go. But pretty much nothing,” Trump said when Fox medical analyst Dr Marc Siegel asked the president what medications he was still taking.

Earlier in the day, Dr Sean Conley, Trump’s personal physician, issued a letter clearing the president to return to in-person campaign events, but omitting any medical justification, including crucial information about any negative coronavirus tests.

In the Friday interview, Trump said he had been tested, but gave a vague answer about it. “I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet,” he said. “But I’ve been retested and I know I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free.”

Trump’s speech today at the White House South Lawn will address “law and order” and protests around the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd and racial issues, sources revealed on Friday.

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Government must focus on the public interest in race to a vaccine

The first presidential debate was less an argument over policies and ideas than a boxing match. But there was at least one brief exchange that bordered on an ideological debate.

“We prefer a vaccine,” said Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Sanders endorses more than 150 down-ballot Democrats Debate commission cancels Oct. 15 Trump-Biden debate MORE about the COVID-19 pandemic. “But I don’t trust [President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE] at all, and neither do you. I know you don’t. What we trust is a scientist.”

“You don’t trust Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer?” the president responded.

Unfortunately, the discussion then drifted to trading blows about who spends more time golfing.

Reading between the lines, the candidates were debating the role of government in public health and other public goods. Should people trust private corporations over public institutions? What’s the government’s responsibility in making sure everyone has access to essential public goods, like vaccines, clean water and a quality education?

Virologists and other trusting scientific experts agree that when it comes to the eventual rollout of a vaccine, administering them will be a massive government operation, in which “good management skills and logistics” will be necessary.

This aligns with what’s worked in other places. Vietnam, a country of 95 million people, has suffered only 35 deaths due to the virus. Experts chalk that up to the government’s swift and coordinated implementation of mass testing, lockdowns, contact tracing and compulsory mask wearing.

Such a public response is hard to imagine in the U.S. because we’ve been swimming in anti-government ideology since at least the Reagan administration — which gets to the heart of what was briefly debated in Cleveland. 

How can we trust big drug companies? Hundreds of legal cases have been filed against some of them related to the opioid epidemic, which has so far claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. 

But it goes beyond a few companies with bad track records. It goes to the very nature of market competition versus the responsibility of public institutions in American life.

We’re repeatedly told that market competition — the pursuit of profit and choice — is the only way to make progress and prosperity happen. 

Yes, competition can be a positive force — it drives people to do better and companies to come up with better products and services. But corporations have a clear interest that doesn’t always align with, nor benefit, the public.

That’s why we can’t trust corporations to provide public goods by themselves. It is why things we all rely on, like vaccines, need government coordination and regulation, and other things, like the U.S. Postal Service, should be wholly public. It is why in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine

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PortsToronto Receives Canadian Public Relations Society Gold Award of Excellence for Seabin Pilot Program

TORONTO, Oct. 8, 2020 /CNW/ – PortsToronto has won a Canadian Public Relations Society (CPRS) Gold National Award of Excellence for the PortsToronto Seabin Pilot Program in the Best Use of Media Relations – Small Budget (less than $10,000 CAD).

A Seabin is photographed at the launch of Phase Two of the PortsToronto Seabin Pilot Program at Pier 6 on Toronto's waterfront in October 2019. (CNW Group/PortsToronto)

The CPRS National Awards of Excellence recognize outstanding achievement in a comprehensive public relations and communications project or program, with judging executed by expert panels of leading public relations and communications management practitioners from across the country. The awards were established in 1962 and are considered one of Canada’s most prestigious public relations honours.

The launch of the Seabin Pilot Program, a first in Canada, aimed to reinforce PortsToronto’s role as leaders in sustainability, reduce litter in Toronto’s harbour and encourage behavioural changes amongst the public to reduce reliance on single-use plastics. PortsToronto sought to amplify this message by generating positive earned media coverage through national and local media outlets, gain traction through social media channels by connecting with other waterfront agencies and government leaders, as well as pique the interest of credible, future project collaborators for phase three of the program.

“PortsToronto is immensely proud of this important chapter in our sustainability journey. Pairing a modest budget and hard work, we were able to generate the attention the Seabin Pilot Program deserved and amplify our messaging to a wide audience, including the waterfront stakeholders with whom we hope to collaborate on a future expansion of the program,” said Deborah Wilson, Vice-President, Communications and Public Affairs, PortsToronto. “We are thrilled to be recognized by the best in the industry for the resourcefulness and dedication of our communications team in executing this successful media relations campaign.”

In November 2019, PortsToronto received the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) Living City Impact Award and the Boating Ontario Robert Eaton Environmental Award in November for implementing the Seabin Pilot Project.

To learn more about PortsToronto’s Seabin Pilot Program, click here or visit www.portstoronto.com.

About the CPRS Awards of Excellence
The CPRS National Awards of Excellence recognize outstanding achievement in a comprehensive public relations and communications project or program, with judging executed by expert panels of leading public relations and communications management practitioners from across the country. The awards were established in 1962 and are considered one of Canada’s most prestigious public relations honours.

About CPRS
Founded in 1948, the Canadian Public Relations Society (CPRS) is a not-for-profit association of professionals dedicated to the practice, management and teaching of public relations and communications. Comprising 14 local societies, CPRS’ mission is to build a national public relations and communications management community through professional development and accreditation, collaboration with thought leaders, a commitment to ethics and a code of professional standards, advocacy for the profession, and support to members at every stage of their careers. For more information, visit https://www.cprs.ca/.

About PortsToronto
For more than 100 years PortsToronto has worked with its partners at the federal, provincial and municipal levels to enhance the economic growth of the City of Toronto and the

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Israeli government extends ban that limits public protests

JERUSALEM — The Israeli government has extended an emergency provision that bars public gatherings, including widespread protests against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, for an additional week.

Government ministers approved the measure until Oct. 13 by a telephone vote, the Prime Minister’s Office said in a statement late Wednesday.

Israel imposed a nationwide lockdown ahead of the Jewish High Holidays last month to rein in the country’s surging coronavirus outbreak. The Knesset, Israel’s parliament, passed a law last week allowing the government to declare a special week-long state of emergency to limit participation in assemblies because of the pandemic. The government then declared the state of emergency, limiting all public gatherings to within a kilometer (0.6 miles) of a person’s home.

Netanyahu has said the restrictions are driven by safety concerns as the country battles a runaway pandemic, but critics and protesters accuse him of tightening the lockdown to muzzle their movement and expression of dissent.

Thousands of Israelis have participated in weekly demonstrations outside Netanyahu’s official residence in Jerusalem for months this summer, calling on the longtime prime minister to resign while on trial for corruption.

Since the restriction was approved last month, tens of thousands of Israelis have staged protests on street corners and public squares near their homes against the government’s perceived mishandling of the coronavirus crisis and its economic fallout.

On Thursday, an Israeli protester painted the Hebrew word “Go” — an increasingly popular slogan among anti-Netanyahu protesters — in large letters across Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square.

Israel was initially praised for its swift imposition of restrictions in February to curb the spread of the coronavirus. But after reopening the economy and schools in May, new cases increased quickly. It imposed a second lockdown on Sept. 18 as the infection rate skyrocketed to one of the highest per capita in the world.

The Health Ministry has recorded over 282,000 confirmed cases of the disease and over 1,800 deaths in the country of around 9 million people.

After nearly three weeks of lockdown, the number of new cases is gradually decreasing, but infections are still spreading, particularly among the country’s hard-hit ultra-Orthodox Jewish community.

Israel’s ultra-Orthodox community, which makes up around 10% of the country’s population, accounts for more than a third of Israel’s virus cases. Some members of the community have flouted the rules and held prayers in enclosed spaces, large festive gatherings and clashed with police over their enforcement of regulations.

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How slashed state budgets affect female teachers and public schools

  • Women, especially teachers, are carrying much of the financial burden as states slash budgets and education spending during the pandemic.
  • June Carbone, Nancy Levit, and Naomi Cahn are law professors tracking how the pandemic is affecting women and contributing to inequality in all types of industries, from public schools to hedge funds.
  • They found that the percentage of women working as K-12 teachers is growing, but the diminishing education budget is leading to lower pay and fewer promotions and leadership opportunities. 
  • Providing government assistance to states — also known as countercyclical assistance — and advocating for more federal control over state budgets could help public schools and teachers pull through. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

States are seeing enormous budget shortfalls because of the coronavirus pandemic, and the consequences for teachers and other public school employees could be dire. At least 640,000 education jobs in state and local government vanished between February and August 2020.

The states, which provide an average of about 47% of US public school funding, are cutting school spending because their tax revenue is declining and they have no easy recourse to balance their budgets; unlike the federal government, states can’t just print money.

Negotiations continue around another pandemic relief bill, which would include money for states to spend on public education. But lawmakers have passed no measures since May, when the House of Representatives passed a $3 trillion coronavirus relief bill that stalled in the Senate.

We study families, employment, corporations — and gender. We are tracking how the coronavirus pandemic is underscoring the disproportionate financial burden women bear when states slash their budgets in times of recession.

Without sufficient federal aid, recessions have historically prompted job losses, pay cuts, and high turnover that burden school districts for years. Because most public school teachers are women, they are affected more.

We are examining this issue and others more deeply in a book we are writing called “Shafted: The Fate of Women in a Winner-Take-All World.” It explores the jobs women do from public schools to Walmart or hedge funds and demonstrates that the forces that have produced a highly unequal economy have undermined women’s well-being.

What we’ve found so far is that women in almost every field have lagged behind men in pay, promotions, and leadership opportunities. And in K-12 schools, this issue can appear starkly.

The government’s role

Historically, the federal government has implemented policies aimed at keeping the economy afloat during recessions.

During the Great Recession, for example, the 2009 stimulus package included money that cushioned the impact of the recession on the states. Economists largely agree that the policy worked. The spending bolstered state budgets, helping to prevent massive layoffs and prompt the start of a recovery.

Nationwide, education spending averages about 30% of state budgets, with two-thirds of the funds supporting K-12 education. More specifically, the average state expenditures are 21% on elementary and secondary education and 10% on higher education.

After Republicans swept Congress in 2010, however, the

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NSW government sets public cloud as default standard for agencies

Adopting public cloud will now be the default for all government state agencies under a new principle that has been introduced by the New South Wales government under its new cloud strategy.

Under the new principle, Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello said all agencies would embed a “public cloud by default” principle for all IT procurement decisions and have the “highest security, privacy, and contractual safeguards” when going to market for computing services.  

“It is a move that will accelerate innovation, modernise service delivery, and create better outcomes for the citizens of NSW,” Dominello said in a statement on Friday.

“A modern and reliable cloud strategy and cloud policy will enable government-wide adoption of public cloud services in a united and secure manner.”

According to the state government, the strategy has been designed to provide government agencies with a “common vision, direction, and approach for consuming cloud services”.

It also touted that the strategy has been designed to lower cybersecurity and privacy risks. 

Last month, Service NSW revealed that the personal information of 186,000 customers was stolen because of a cyber attack earlier this year on 47 staff email accounts.  

Following a four-month investigation that began in April, Service NSW said it identified that 738GB of data, which compromised of 3.8 million documents, was stolen from the email accounts. 

Service NSW said it would progressively notify affected customers by sending personalised letters via registered post containing information about the data that was stolen and how they could access support, including access to an individual case manager to help with possibly replacing some documents. The agency expects to complete notifying customers in December.  

The introduction of cloud strategy is part of the state government’s digital transformation program.

Most recently, Dominello vowed to make the state the digital capital of the southern hemisphere in the next three years and released the inaugural artificial intelligence strategy to help achieve that goal.

Prior to that, the NSW government launched its Smart Places Strategy and Smart Infrastructure Policy, which outlined how it plans to build sensors and technology into infrastructure and buildings.

Under that strategy, the government hopes to see all smart places be embedded with sensors and communications technology in infrastructure and the natural environment; see sensors and technology solutions be used to capture, safely store, and make government-acquired data available; and be able to communicate information and insights using the data to drive decisions. 

Dominello boasted that building smart tech into infrastructure and buildings would create jobs, enhance security, improve quality of life, reduce environmental impacts, and promote data sharing.

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Uncharted Society Brings Socially Distanced Adventure To Public Lands

Powersports company partners with outfitters to take travelers to “hidden playgrounds.”

Sea-Doo wants you to rip through the water-bound canyons of Lake Powell. Can-Am hopes you’ll leave a trail of dust through the Mojave Desert. Ski-Doo wants to see you summiting the powdery slopes of the Rocky Mountains. And each of these power sport brands is hoping to lure Americans into the outdoors under the banner of their new, joint experience called Uncharted Society.

Uncharted Society launched in June, with around 40 curated experiences focused on adventuring in America’s public lands. “These vehicles are allowing people to discover hidden playgrounds and lands that are not always accessible otherwise, such as snowy mountain tops or sand dunes in the desert,” says BRP-X Innovation Lab Program Lead Véronique Lacroix.

Those hidden playgrounds include Yosemite, California; Bryce Canyon, Utah; Vail, Colorado; Madeira Beach, Florida; and Las Vegas, Nevada among others.

According to BRP, sales of powersports vehicles were up 40% this summer. Uncharted Society hopes to capitalize on that momentum by making powersports more accessible to travelers who may not be owners of equipment themselves. “Our experiences are managed by independent outfitters,” adds BRP Global Consumer Public Relations Lead Brian Manning. “Our outfitters’ activities are running full-throttle, and our pilot project has shown to be successful since the launch.”

Manning says Uncharted Society outfitters like Wilderness Collective and Up Lake Adventures are notching a greater than 90% satisfaction level on experiences—a figure that is pushing BRP to develop more partnerships and expand the number of available opportunities.

Adventure with Amenities

Uncharted Society trips come fully-loaded with a laundry list of features aimed to give each outing an air of exclusivity. From the moment guests depart, food and beverages (including alcohol) are included. Riding equipment like helmets and gloves or personal floatation devices are provided. $100,000 worth of travel insurance is standard. And overnight trips come equipped with tents, chairs and camp kitchens—in addition to a personal chef, videographer and photographer.

That means every adventurer on every Uncharted Society trip will come home with an Instagram feed worth of content from their excursion, all without ever having to take a single selfie.

The introduction of Uncharted Society coincides with a nationwide trend of increased participation in outdoor recreation. According to the Outdoor Industry Roundtable—a coalition of organizations including the American Sportfishing Association, RV Industry Association, National Marine Manufacturers Association, Outdoor Industry Association and Motorcycle Industry Council—81% of Americans have spent leisure time outside during the COVID-19 pandemic. 31% of those Americans, the roundtable says, are doing so for the very first time.

Within the $887 billion U.S. outdoor recreation economy, sales of lifestyle products like ATVs and motorcycles are

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