Tag: Race

Tight race in St. Louis County’s 6th District could help shape county government | Politics

Two other seats are up for grabs in strongly Democratic council districts. Incumbent Kelli Dunaway, the Democrat elected to replace Page in the 2nd District last year, and soundly defeated Creve Coeur Mayor Barry Glantz in the primary, faces Republican Jerry Bowen and Libertarian Arnold Trembley. Shalonda Webb, who upset incumbent Rochelle Walton Gray in the Democratic primary for the 4th District, faces Republican Curtis Faulkner and Libertarian Eric S. Harris.

Trakas has been in battle his entire term. The attorney from Oakville overcame a shadowy recall petition and a lawsuit to remove him from office on the theory that his legal work for outstate school districts disqualified him from serving — each of which he blamed on Stenger.

But the county also settled a sexual harassment complaint against Trakas by his former legislative aide, and Trakas has at times exploded at the county’s legal staff. And, in recent weeks, he’s lost support from several within his party who think he is too close to Page. Trakas said the lack of support from Republicans didn’t bother him.

‘Do the right thing’

“I don’t subscribe to any type of gospel,” he said. “I’m always going to try and do the right thing as God gives me the eyes to see what to do.”

Burns easily defeated two strong candidates in the August primary and has been supported by Councilman Tim Fitch, R-3rd District. While Days hasn’t made any appearances for Burns, she said she supports him as a party mate.

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Democrat’s praise of strict gun law roils Kansas Senate race

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Republicans on Sunday circulated a video of the Democrats’ candidate for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas praising strict Australian gun laws that she said “took them all away” to undercut her campaign as a political moderate in what’s been an unexpectedly tough red-state race for the GOP.



U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., the Republican nominee for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas, speaks during a stop in a GOP bus tour of the state, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, in Topeka, Kan. Asked about President Donald Trump's tweet after being treated for coronavirus that people should not fear COVID-19, Marshall told reporters, "Of course, I think everyone should respect the virus." (AP Photo/John Hanna)


© Provided by Associated Press
U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., the Republican nominee for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas, speaks during a stop in a GOP bus tour of the state, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, in Topeka, Kan. Asked about President Donald Trump’s tweet after being treated for coronavirus that people should not fear COVID-19, Marshall told reporters, “Of course, I think everyone should respect the virus.” (AP Photo/John Hanna)

Democrat Barbara Bollier’s spokeswoman accused Republican Roger Marshall’s campaign of being “duplicitous” in highlighting the video from an Oct. 3 “lawn chair chat” at a Kansas City-area park. Bollier’s campaign released longer audio from the same event that included moments in which Bollier said she supports the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protecting gun rights and recalled hunting with her father.

The race appears to be close between Marshall, a two-term congressman for western and central Kansas, and Bollier, a Kansas City-area state senator who was a lifelong moderate Republican before switching parties late in 2018. As the GOP fights to keep its 53-47 majority in the Senate, Marshall and his supporters have attacked Bollier on issues that favor Republicans in much of the state, including gun rights.

Both a 2 1/2-minute video clip provided to The Associated Press by the Marshall campaign and longer audio from Bollier’s show that she noted that an adult daughter lives in Australia and praised a law there that in the 1990s forced owners of 700,000 guns to sell them to the government as “this amazing thing.”

“They have no guns. They don’t allow them. They just took them all away,” Bollier told her audience. “And you know what? It’s pretty darn safe.”

Bollier also noted that Australia imposes licensing and training requirements for gun owners. Kansas law allows adults to carry weapons openly, and it allows them to carry concealed firearms without a permit — a policy Bollier opposed as a legislator when it was enacted in 2015.

“Who thinks you can just go out and have a gun? Seriously,” Bollier said. “You can’t drive a car without training. You can’t basically do anything without some kind of training. This is a lethal weapon.”

As the video clip began circulating, Bollier tweeted Sunday afternoon: “I do not support gun confiscation. I never have. I never will.”

Republicans have not lost a Senate race in Kansas since 1932, but Bollier has flooded the airwaves with ads that have included testimonials from former GOP state lawmakers.

The race had seen a Kansas record of $32 million in advertising as of last week, with Marshall and his allies being outspent, according to the media advertising firm Advertising Analytics.

Bollier’s campaign

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Democrat’s Praise of Strict Gun Law Roils Kansas Senate Race | Political News

By JOHN HANNA, AP Political Writer

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Republicans on Sunday circulated a video of the Democrats’ candidate for an open U.S. Senate seat in Kansas praising strict Australian gun laws that she said “took them all away” to undercut her campaign as a political moderate in what’s been an unexpectedly tough red-state race for the GOP.

Democrat Barbara Bollier’s spokeswoman accused Republican Roger Marshall’s campaign of being “duplicitous” in highlighting the video. Bollier’s campaign released longer audio from the same event that included moments in which Bollier said she supports the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protecting gun rights and recalled hunting with her father.

The race appears to be close between Marshall, a two-term congressman for western and central Kansas, and Bollier, a Kansas City-area state senator who was a lifelong moderate Republican before switching parties late in 2018. As the GOP fights to keep its 53-47 majority in the Senate, Marshall and his supporters have attacked Bollier on issues that favor Republicans in much of the state, including gun rights.

Both a 2 1/2-minute video clip provided to The Associated Press by the Marshall campaign and the longer audio from Bollier’s show that she noted that an adult daughter lives in Australia and praised a law there that in the 1990s forced owners of 700,000 guns to sell them to the government as “this amazing thing.”

“They have no guns. They don’t allow them. They just took them all away,” Bollier told her audience. “And you know what? It’s pretty darn safe.”

Bollier also noted that Australia imposes licensing and training requirements for gun owners. Kansas law allows adults to carry weapons openly, and it allows them to carry concealed firearms without a permit — a policy Bollier opposed a legislator when it was enacted in 2015.

“Who thinks you can just go out and have gun? Seriously,” Bollier said. “You can’t drive a car without training. You can’t basically do anything with some kind of training. This is a lethal weapon.”

As the video clip began circulating, Bollier tweeted Sunday afternoon: “I do not support gun confiscation. I never have. I never will.”

Republicans have not lost a Senate race in Kansas since 1932, but Bollier has flooded the airwaves with ads that have included testimonials from former GOP state lawmakers.

The race had seen a Kansas record of $32 million in advertising as of last week, with Marshall and his allies being outspent, according to the media advertising firm Advertising Analytics.

Bollier’s campaign had spent more than $9 million, with outside groups paying for about $8 million more. Nearly 90% of the roughly $14.5 million in ads for Marshall were covered by outside groups, with the Marshall campaign spending about $1.5 million, according to Advertising Analytics.

Bollier’s remarks on guns first were reported Sunday by The Washington Free Beacon conservative site. Marshall’s campaign manager, Eric Pahls, texted a 36-second excerpt to The Associated Press. He later provided a link to a longer

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Government must focus on the public interest in race to a vaccine

The first presidential debate was less an argument over policies and ideas than a boxing match. But there was at least one brief exchange that bordered on an ideological debate.

“We prefer a vaccine,” said Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Sanders endorses more than 150 down-ballot Democrats Debate commission cancels Oct. 15 Trump-Biden debate MORE about the COVID-19 pandemic. “But I don’t trust [President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE] at all, and neither do you. I know you don’t. What we trust is a scientist.”

“You don’t trust Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer?” the president responded.

Unfortunately, the discussion then drifted to trading blows about who spends more time golfing.

Reading between the lines, the candidates were debating the role of government in public health and other public goods. Should people trust private corporations over public institutions? What’s the government’s responsibility in making sure everyone has access to essential public goods, like vaccines, clean water and a quality education?

Virologists and other trusting scientific experts agree that when it comes to the eventual rollout of a vaccine, administering them will be a massive government operation, in which “good management skills and logistics” will be necessary.

This aligns with what’s worked in other places. Vietnam, a country of 95 million people, has suffered only 35 deaths due to the virus. Experts chalk that up to the government’s swift and coordinated implementation of mass testing, lockdowns, contact tracing and compulsory mask wearing.

Such a public response is hard to imagine in the U.S. because we’ve been swimming in anti-government ideology since at least the Reagan administration — which gets to the heart of what was briefly debated in Cleveland. 

How can we trust big drug companies? Hundreds of legal cases have been filed against some of them related to the opioid epidemic, which has so far claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. 

But it goes beyond a few companies with bad track records. It goes to the very nature of market competition versus the responsibility of public institutions in American life.

We’re repeatedly told that market competition — the pursuit of profit and choice — is the only way to make progress and prosperity happen. 

Yes, competition can be a positive force — it drives people to do better and companies to come up with better products and services. But corporations have a clear interest that doesn’t always align with, nor benefit, the public.

That’s why we can’t trust corporations to provide public goods by themselves. It is why things we all rely on, like vaccines, need government coordination and regulation, and other things, like the U.S. Postal Service, should be wholly public. It is why in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine

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