Tag: Trumps

Unrest in Avon? Trump’s message of law and order, loaded with racist undertones, takes aim at safety and security in Connecticut suburbs

In the eyes of President Donald Trump and some Republicans, electing the Democrats in 2020 would lead to a clear and frightening outcome: tranquil suburbs in Connecticut and elsewhere would be overrun by crime, violent protests, and social decay.

It’s an old message with a new twist, fueled by the backlash against Black Lives Matter protests and demonstrations this summer that were largely peaceful in Connecticut, but turned violent in Portland, Chicago, Los Angeles and other cities.

Referring to the prospect of civil unrest, David X. Sullivan, a Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District, told the Courant that he is “concerned about Avon, Farmington and Simsbury becoming as violent as Portland, New York and Chicago.”

Unrest in Avon?

Trump’s law and order message and its many versions may sound far-fetched to some. But there is a racist undertone to the rhetoric that has proven effective in the past, said Noel A. Cazenave, a professor of sociology at UConn. It reflects a long history of American politicians attempting to secure votes by playing up racial fears.

A Trump campaign video from July conjures up a world of defenseless suburbs under attack, showing a fictionalized scene of an elderly white woman watching a news segment about the defunding of the police as a shadowy intruder breaks into her house. She calls 9-1-1 but there is no dispatcher to pick up. The ad flashes a message: “You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.”

Sullivan said he rejects any implication that there is a racial element to his campaign messaging, which he described as an effort to “promote safety, in our homes, in our workplaces.”

But Cazenave notes that fear-mongering in political campaigns has deep roots in America, from Richard Nixon’s “Law and Order” campaign in the late 1960s to George H. W. Bush’s late 1980s political ad centered on Willie Horton, a Black man incarcerated in Massachusetts who raped a white woman while released on furlough, meant to demonstrate his Democratic opponent’s weak stance on crime. Trump is exploiting those same themes this year, Cazenave said.

“Donald Trump’s appeal to European-American suburban women voters is intended to exploit fear that if Joe Biden is elected, low-income African Americans and African American protestors will invade their suburbs,” Cazenave said. He noted that the tactic is “an extension of the old racist trope of imperiled white women.”

Message resonating?

Many Trump supporters in the state say they find comfort in Trump’s promise of safety and were angered to see Connecticut law enforcement come under attack during Black Lives Matter protests this summer and through the recent police accountability bill signed by Gov. Ned Lamont.

In a Biden White House, Trump supporters say they fear the dismantling of constitutional liberties and a lax approach to public safety.

“We haven’t seen the Democrats come out and really put a squash on the increase in crime or the rioting out West and even though we haven’t seen it here, there is that fear that

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Explainer: How Trump’s Supreme Court nominee applies the law to LGBT+ rights

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court has alarmed many LGBT+ advocates, who fear the appointment of another conservative judge would jeopardise the rights of gay and trans people.

FILE PHOTO: Rainbow flags fly at Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan in support of the LGBT community, prior to the 51st anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, in New York City, New York, U.S., June 26, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

If confirmed, Barrett, who has described conservative judge Antonin Scalia as her mentor, would push the country’s highest court to a 6-3 conservative majority.

At 48, she could serve for decades in the lifetime job, potentially leaving a lasting conservative legacy.

“Confirming Barrett will drag America backwards,” Sarah Kate Ellis, head of the LGBT+ advocacy group GLAAD, said in a statement when she was nominated.

As the U.S. Senate on Monday opened a four-day confirmation hearing, here is a look at Barrett’s record on LGBT+ rights.

DEFENDING DISSENT ON SAME-SEX MARRIAGE

In a 2016 lecture, Barrett defended the justices who dissented against the landmark 2015 ruling that legalized gay marriage nationwide, known as Obergefell v. Hodges.

She suggested that the ruling should have been decided by legislators not the court.

“Those who want same-sex marriage, you have every right to lobby in state legislatures to make that happen, but the dissent’s view was that it wasn’t for the court to decide,” Barrett said then.

“So I think Obergefell, and what we’re talking about for the future of the court, it’s really a who decides question,” she said.

Criticism of the gay marriage ruling was revived this month when Justice Clarence Thomas and Justice Samuel Alito said the ruling continues to have “ruinous consequences” for religious liberty.

LBGT+ advocacy groups took those comments as a worrying sign for same-sex marriage and gay rights on a court moving further rightward.

BATHROOM ACCESS FOR TRANS PEOPLE

Barrett has also argued against extending Title IX protections, federal civil rights laws barring Americans from discrimination on the basis of sex, to trans Americans.

In the same 2016 lecture, Barrett said that applying Title IX to fight against policies banning trans people from using the bathroom that aligns with their gender identity would be a “strain” of the text.

“When Title IX was enacted, it’s pretty clear that no one, including the Congress that enacted that statute, would have dreamed of that result, at that time,” Barrett said, referring to the extension of the rights to trans Americans.

Instead, Barrett said that the debate should be decided by U.S. Congress.

“Maybe things have changed so that we should change Title IX, maybe those arguing in favor of this kind of transgender bathroom access are right. That’s a public policy debate to have.”

RELIGIOUS EXEMPTIONS

Later this year, the court will decide on a major religious rights dispute involving the city of Philadelphia’s refusal to place children for foster care with a Catholic agency that bars same-sex couples

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Inside Trump’s push to use government funds to save his campaign

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

President Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a campaign rally at Arnold Palmer Regional Airport on September 3, 2020 in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. Trump won Pennsylvania in the 2016 election by a narrow margin. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

If President Donald Trump loses to former Vice President Joe Biden in this year’s presidential election, two of the main reasons are likely to be his response to his COVID-19 pandemic and his health care policy — specifically, Trump’s push to eliminate the Affordable Care Act and its protections for people with preexisting conditions. One desperate move that Trump is making in the hope of saving his campaign is promising senior citizens drug discount cards, and Politico’s Dan Diamond is reporting that Trump wants them to be available before November 3.

Diamond reports:

Caught by surprise by President Donald Trump’s promise to deliver drug-discount cards to seniors, health officials are scrambling to get the nearly $8 billion plan done by Election Day, according to five officials and draft documents obtained by Politico. The taxpayer-funded plan, which was only announced two weeks ago and is being justified inside the White House and the Health Department as a test of the Medicare program, is being driven by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, the officials said.

The $200 cards, Diamond notes, “would resemble credit cards” and “would need to be used at pharmacies” — and they “would be paid for by tapping Medicare’s trust fund.”

Politico has obtained a copy of a draft proposal for the plan that has been circulated in the White House, and according to the proposal, “The goal is to begin the test by distributing cards starting in October 2020.”

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Trump’s idea for drug discount cards for seniors comes at a time when many polls are showing his support among seniors falling. And Rep. Frank Pallone, the Democrat who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee, isn’t the least bit impressed by the proposal. Pallone told Politico, “It’s a shameless stunt that steals billions from Medicare in order to fund a legally dubious scheme that’s clearly intended to benefit President Trump’s campaign right before Election Day.”

An official for the Department of Health and Human Services, quoted anonymously, told Politico, “It’s turning into this last-minute, thrown-together thing.” And another HHS official interviewed by Politico said, “This is a solution in search of a problem and a bald play for votes in the form of money in pockets.”

Stacie Dusetzina, a professor at Vanderbilt University who has studied Medicare’s drug program, went over the draft proposal — and Dusetzina told Politico, “There are a lot of things that seem problematic. It’s an incredibly large amount of money to be spending, (and) it’s not really solving any systemic problem.”

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Twitter has had plenty of reactions to Diamond’s article and Trump’s drug card proposal. Juliette Cubanski, deputy director of the Program on Medicare Policy, tweeted,

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As Donald Trump’s Law-and-Order Message Fails In Minnesota, Campaign Moves Money to Must-Win Florida

The release on bail of Derek Chauvin, the officer charged in George Floyd’s death, prompted yet another surge of unrest in Minnesota. But even as demonstrations filled the streets for a second night, Donald Trump’s campaign was pulling ad money out of the state. The president’s law-and-order message, which campaign officials had expected to resonate in the protest-torn state, wasn’t working.



a group of people posing for the camera: Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.


© KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images
Law and order? Protesters lock arms during a demonstration after the release on bail of former police officer, Derek Chauvin, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 7, 2020.

Trump taking down the fabled “blue wall” of Rust Belt states—Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan—was the most shocking component of his historic upset in 2016. Just as unexpected, to Democrats, pollsters and political pundits, was this: he nearly won Minnesota, falling just 1.5 points behind Hillary Clinton in what was supposed to be the bluest of blue states. Democrats have won in Minnesota every presidential cycle since 1976, the longest streak in the nation.

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The Trump campaign went all in this time around, convinced it could flip the state and give him some electoral breathing room should, say, Wisconsin (which, like Minnesota, has ten electoral votes) flip back to the Democrats. It has 79 paid staffers in the state, Trump staged rallies there three times in the last three months, and campaign surrogates have been in the state repeatedly.

With Trump currently trailing in all the Blue Wall states he won in 2016, the need to carry Minnesota looks more urgent than ever. The problem for Trump: the state appears to be slipping away. According to Real Clear Politics, an aggregation of recent polling done through the month of September shows the president trailing in the state by nine points. And the demographic break downs of those polls—the so-called “internals”— are even more dispiriting for the Trump Team. They show the president underperforming relative to 2016 in his key constituency: white males without college degrees.

The fact that Trump hasn’t drawn closer in Minnesota suggests that a key strategic shift in the Trump campaign in the late summer—its emphasis on ‘law and order” in the wake of urban unrest across the country—has not worked. Late this spring, Minnesota became ground zero for two issues that have since roiled the country: the death of George Floyd at the hands of three police officers fueled outrage nationwide, prompting large demonstrations demanding racial justice and significant change in law enforcement. In many cases, however, the protests turned violent, something the Trump campaign seized on.

Election Day 2020: Where Trump, Biden Stand In The Polls 30 Days Before Nov. 3

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“Law and order” became a campaign catchword—a nightly staple on Fox News—and the campaign cut TV ads emphasizing the looting and violence, trying to tie it to Biden and the Democrats. Trump strategists were convinced the chaos in Minneapolis and elsewhere would redound to the president’s benefit, particularly in largely white, middle-class suburbs.

Video:

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Trump’s law-and-order mantra goes missing in wake of domestic terror plot against Democratic governor

Over the summer, as racial justice demonstrations swept through American cities, President Donald Trump warned he would wield the powers of government to suppress violence. Embracing a “law and order” mantle, Trump himself announced from the East Room a surge of federal agents and castigated groups such as Black Lives Matter as cultivating “hate.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a flag: NEWPORT NEWS, VA - SEPTEMBER 25: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport on September 25, 2020 in Newport News, Virginia. President Trump is scheduled to announce his nomination to the Supreme Court to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday afternoon at the White House. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
NEWPORT NEWS, VA – SEPTEMBER 25: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport on September 25, 2020 in Newport News, Virginia. President Trump is scheduled to announce his nomination to the Supreme Court to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday afternoon at the White House. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

“My first duty as President is to protect the American people, and today I’m taking action to fulfill that sacred obligation,” he declared.

A few months later, Trump’s only acknowledgment of his government taking down an alleged domestic terrorism plot to kidnap the Democratic governor of Michigan was to wonder why he hadn’t been thanked.

How Trump chooses to promote his administration’s efforts to enforce “law and order” follow a clear pattern of political calculation; in instances when the Justice Department finds cases that bolster his claims of fraudulent voting, rampant urban crime or deep state corruption, Trump is eager to participate.

But when the government has worked to combat extremist anti-government groups — which even his own FBI says present the most pressing threat to the nation — Trump has at best ignored the efforts and at worst used them to fan the very resentments held by the groups’ followers.

The situation could only become more fraught as the election nears and as some extremist groups seek to retaliate against continued lockdown orders. Trump himself has railed against continued restrictions and has pointedly refused to call for post-election calm, even as he makes false claims about a rigged vote.

Former officials and others familiar with the situation say Trump has demonstrated little interest in making efforts to combat domestic terrorism a priority for his administration, despite warnings from law enforcement officials, members of Congress and groups that track extremism about the increasing threat of extremist and far-right groups. Some have claimed White House officials attempted to suppress use of the phrase “domestic terrorism” altogether over the course of the Trump administration.

Others said it was evident Trump recognized his own supporters were among those being labeled “domestic terrorists” and believed it would damage his standing with his base to warn of their danger.

Animated instead by immigration enforcement and a crackdown on urban crime — issues he believes galvanize his voters — Trump has publicly downplayed the threat posed by armed militia groups and sought to focus attention elsewhere.

After the FBI investigated whether local officials in Pennsylvania improperly discarded ballots, Trump was briefed personally on the matter by Attorney General Bill Barr and revealed details of it during a Fox interview before they were made public.

He has also

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Perdue rebuked for violating ethics law by boosting Trump’s reelection

Citizens for Ethics and Responsibility in Washington, a nonpartisan watchdog group, filed a formal complaint that Perdue’s remarks were a clear violation of the Hatch Act. The special counsel’s office on Thursday concluded that Perdue had indeed crossed the line and ordered him to reimburse the government for travel expenses and other costs of his involvement in the North Carolina event.

“Taken as a whole, Secretary Perdue’s comments during the August 24 event encouraged those present, and those watching remotely, to vote for President Trump’s reelection,” the office wrote. “His first words were not about USDA, but about the president’s 2016 and 2020 campaigns.”

“Provided that immediate corrective action is taken and the U.S. Treasury is reimbursed for such costs, OSC will decline to pursue disciplinary action and instead consider this file closed with the issuance of the cure letter,” it added.

The special counsel’s office also noted that, when asked to explain Perdue’s remarks, USDA argued that “at no point did the secretary encourage or direct the crowd to vote for the president,” but merely “predicted future behavior based on the president’s focus on helping ‘forgotten people,’” farmers and unemployed workers. But the office said that USDA “offered no legal basis for its conclusion.”

The department did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the final decision.

Ethics authorities have already issued warnings to a dozen Trump administration officials for violating the Hatch Act, but Perdue’s straightforward appeal to reelect Trump was seen as especially flagrant.

“Even in an administration that has racked up a record number of Hatch Act violations, it is still shocking to see a Cabinet secretary violate the law in such an egregious manner,” said CREW Executive Director Noah Bookbinder in a statement.

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Trump’s doctor leans on health privacy law to duck questions

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president’s treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient’s condition.



Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, center, and other doctors, walk out to talk with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, center, and other doctors, walk out to talk with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley’s selective disclosures appears to be Trump’s comfort level in fully revealing his medical information.



Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, talks with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, talks with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

“That’s a little head-scratcher,” said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It’s quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.”

At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges.



White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, seated left, and Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, listen as doctors talk with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, seated left, and Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, listen as doctors talk with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

But when reporters pressed for details on the results of lung scans and when Trump had last tested negative for COVID-19, the doctor demurred, citing HIPAA, as the law is commonly known.

“There is no special protection for lung scans,” McGraw pointed out.

“It really is what the president authorizes to be disclosed,” she explained. “So I am going to have to assume there was a judgment call on what information the president was comfortable releasing to the public.”

The selective disclosure raised more questions about what the president’s doctors aren’t telling the public. Trump returned to the White House later Monday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it’s “disconcerting” that information coming from Trump’s physicians “must be approved by the president.”

Pronounced “hippah,” the law essentially prohibits disclosure of a person’s medical information without their consent. Many people hear about HIPAA when they call the hospital seeking information about the condition of a relative and they’re told they can’t have it because of the law.

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Trump’s Doctor Leans on Health Privacy Law to Duck Questions | Health News

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president’s treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient’s condition.

But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley’s selective disclosures appears to be Trump’s comfort level in fully revealing his medical information.

“That’s a little head-scratcher,” said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It’s quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.”

At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges.

But when reporters pressed for details on the results of lung scans and when Trump had last tested negative for COVID-19, the doctor demurred, citing HIPAA, as the law is commonly known.

“There is no special protection for lung scans,” McGraw pointed out.

“It really is what the president authorizes to be disclosed,” she explained. “So I am going to have to assume there was a judgment call on what information the president was comfortable releasing to the public.”

The selective disclosure raised more questions about what the president’s doctors aren’t telling the public. Trump returned to the White House later Monday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it’s “disconcerting” that information coming from Trump’s physicians “must be approved by the president.”

Pronounced “hippah,” the law essentially prohibits disclosure of a person’s medical information without their consent. Many people hear about HIPAA when they call the hospital seeking information about the condition of a relative and they’re told they can’t have it because of the law.

”HIPAA kinda precludes me from going into too much depth in things that, you know, I’m not (at) liberty or he doesn’t wish to be discussed,” said Conley, who holds the rank of Navy commander.

McGraw said there’s a question about whether the White House physician may even be covered by HIPAA. The law is written to apply to doctors and entities that bill for insurance coverage.

That said, a president, like any other individual, has the right to control personal medical information, said Iliana Peters, who also served as a career lawyer overseeing HIPAA enforcement at the Department of Health and Human Services.

“As the person who is the subject of the records, (Trump) owns the right to privacy over his medical record and he gets to decide how that information is shared certainly with the public, and certainly wit the media,” said Peters. “That is the case with any one of us as a patient.”

Peters said “there may be multiple things going on here in that certain disclosures have been authorized and others haven’t.”

Speaking on MSNBC, Pelosi argued

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Trump’s recklessness with COVID stalls government

Since the earliest warning signs that the coronavirus could become a catastrophic pandemic, President Trump has refused to take it seriously. In fact, Trump and his Republican colleagues have gone such great lengths to ignore public health protocols that the president of the United States — ostensibly the most shielded human being on the planet — managed to contract the virus along with several other top government officials, including three United States senators. And now, after so gravely mishandling the pandemic that has killed over 210,000 Americans, the president and his party have effectively brought the federal government to a halt through their own reckless personal behavior, leaving two branches of government compromised while the nation and the world deal with several crises of unprecedented scale.

Even as Trump planned to leave the hospital Monday evening, it was clear he was dealing with serious symptoms of COVID-19, as evidenced by the medications prescribed to him. As of now, the president’s health might still be posing a national security risk. He is on a medication known to have serious behavioral side effects, and experts are warning that foreign adversaries might exploit this moment. Russia, for example, could use his condition to further spread misinformation as part of its election interference strategy, and countries like China could see this as an opportunity to advance regional claims. But the president and his team have yet to take this problem seriously. Though Trump himself is probably unable to perform all the duties of the presidency while he deals with the deadly disease, he so far appears unwilling to make plans to temporarily transfer his powers to the vice president should he fall more seriously ill.

For his part, Mike Pence — who is continuing to travel and host campaign events — is not taking the precautionary measures necessary to keep himself safe from the coronavirus, casting doubt on whether he will be able to assume the presidency if required. In effect, the executive branch is on the brink of calamitous dysfunction, and the only response on the president’s part so far is simply to hope for the best.

Congress is also facing its challenges as a result of Trump’s utter disregard for public health protocols. After three Republican senators tested positive for COVID-19 — possibly from what may have been a super-spreader event at the White House — Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was left with little choice but to postpone any legislative activity for at least two weeks, leaving the legislative branch unable to deal with the pandemic or economic crisis. This postponement comes in the midst of negotiations for the next coronavirus relief package, which Americans desperately need. Every day that passes without federal action leaves more Americans vulnerable either to contracting the virus or falling into poverty — or, as has unfortunately been the case so far, both.

And yet, despite all this chaos, uncertainty, and violation of guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, McConnell is still trying

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Iran university professor and government advisor says ‘ordinary Iranians’ are praying for Trump’s recovery

In the days since President Donald Trump was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus and subsequently transferred to the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), one Tehran-based sociology professor has taken to social media to depict the “two groups” of Iranians “praying” for the infected commander in chief.

“It is not surprising that Donald Trump has been hospitalized for coronavirus; anyone, including the president of any country, can get sick. But it is very strange that those in Iran, among the people whose lives have suffered the most since Trump’s presidency, wish him well,” wrote Mohammad Fazeli, an Iranian sociologist and assistant professor at Tehran’s Shahid Beheshti University, who is also reported to serve as an advisor to the Iranian Minister of Energy and is the deputy director of the Research Center of the Presidential Office, in an Instagram post over the weekend. “I have seen people wishing Trump was released from the hospital safe and sound since morning.”

In his post, Fazeli depicted two distinct groups of Iranians turning to divine intervention to propel the president’s recovery.

“The first group of Trump praying people are often ordinary people who think that although the Trump presidency and the return of sanctions and maximum pressure have caused terrible damage to the Iranian economy and made life difficult for the people, there is no hope for reform inside,” he explained. “Except for external pressure. The economic fundamentals, rethinking governance practices, and turning away from wrong paths.”

POMPEO: U.S.’ FULLY PREPARED’ AGAINST ‘MALIGN ACTORS’ AS TRUMP BATTLES CORONAVIRUS

As for the second group of “Trump health praisers,” Fazeli characterized them as Iranians “who think that his possible death from Corona will increase Joe Biden’s chances of victory, and the opening up of the economic situation and even the psychological impact of this victory will improve the situation of Hassan Rouhani’s administration, and this is not what they like.

“This situation raises a big question for our rulers. The rulers should think about what they have done to bring the first group of worshippers to the point where they hope to exert pressure from their enemies in order to find an opening in their present life and future prospects,” Fazeli surmised. “The second group of Trump health advocates is afraid that his death will lead to an opening in the government and improve its image.”

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani adjusts his face mask in a meeting of the national headquarters of the fight against the COVID-19, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 18, 2020. He estimated as many as 25 million Iranians could have been infected with the coronavirus since the outbreak's beginning, citing an Iranian Health Ministry study that has so far not been made public, the state-run IRNA news agency reported. Writing in Farsi at top right reads, "The Presidency." (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani adjusts his face mask in a meeting of the national headquarters of the fight against the COVID-19, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 18, 2020. He estimated as many as 25 million Iranians could have been infected with the coronavirus since the outbreak’s beginning, citing an Iranian Health Ministry study that has so far not been made public, the state-run IRNA news agency reported. Writing in Farsi at top right reads, “The Presidency.” (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)

SPOTLIGHT ON WALTER REED MEDICAL CENTER BRINGS BACK POWERFUL MEMORIES FOR US WOUNDED WARRIORS

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