Tag: california

New California law considers reparations, and what’s opening in L.A. County

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Plus: COVID outbreak hits Cal State Long Beach, and a man has been charged in Compton cop attack.

I’m Winston Gieseke, philanthropy and special sections editor for The Desert Sun in Palm Springs, wishing you a very happy hump day! It’s hot as usual here in the Coachella Valley, and here are some of today’s hottest California news stories.

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California task force to consider reparations for slavery under bill signed by Gov. Newsom

California Gov. Gavin Newsom the signed Assembly Bill 3121 into law on Wednesday, which opens the door to the state paying reparations to Black Californians. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli, AP)

In breaking news, Deadline reports that California is working on a plan to grant reparations to Black Americans under Assembly Bill 3121, a new law signed today by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“After watching last night’s debate,” Newsom said, referring to President Trump’s reluctance to publicly denounce white supremacy, “this signing can’t come too soon.”

The bill does not outline any specific plans for reparations. Rather, it instructs that a nine-member task force be created to propose ideas on what the reparations should be, whether compensation or restitution, and who should receive them.

The task force will be required to give special considerations to Black Americans who descended from slaves, though not all reparations need to be related to slavery.

While California’s constitution stated that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, unless for punishment of a crime, shall ever be tolerated,” archives suggest that slavery was a common practice in the state in the 19th century.

According to the article, Newsom also signed into law Assembly Bill 979, which requires publicly held California-based corporations “to have at least one director from an underrepresented community by the close of 2021.”

What’s due to reopen in L.A. County

Within the next 10 days, shopping malls in L.A. County are expected to reopen. (Photo: Getty Images)

Since Los Angeles County health officials did not see a surge of COVID infections connected to the Memorial Day holiday weekend, it was announced today that the positivity rate and hospitalization count has reached its lowest level since the start of the pandemic.

As a result, malls and nail salons in Los Angeles County will be permitted to open their doors over the next 10 days to indoor operations with limited capacity, the Los Angeles Times reports. Playgrounds are also permitted to reopen.

Nail salons and indoor malls will be permitted to reopen at 25% capacity, while mall food courts and areas where people congregate will stay closed.

In addition, a motion was passed to allow breweries, wineries and cardrooms to resume outdoor operations.

The reopenings will be staggered over the next 10 days; reopening dates for individual sectors will be announced Friday.

Remains of Palm Springs socialite identified

The Clifford Lambert murder defendants, clockwise from upper left: Kaushal Niroula, Daniel

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California to consider slavery reparations after landmark law passed

California will consider paying reparations to descendants of slavery, becoming the first state in the US on Wednesday to adopt a law to study and develop proposals around the issue.



Photograph: Rich Pedroncelli/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The law establishes a nine-member taskforce to develop recommendations for how California could provide reparations to Black descendants of enslaved people and those affected by slavery, and would look into what form those reparations might take and who would receive them.

Related: Black residents nearly four times as likely to be cited by Los Angeles police, report finds

The recommendations would not be binding. The taskforce must submit a report to the state legislature one year after its first meeting.

Video: The citizens arrest law cited in Ahmaud Arbery’s death was created to control the Black population. (The Washington Post)

The citizens arrest law cited in Ahmaud Arbery’s death was created to control the Black population.

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“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive,” Gavin Newsom, California’s governor, said in a statement. “California’s rich diversity is our greatest asset, and we won’t turn away from this moment to make right the discrimination and disadvantages that Black Californians and people of color still face.”



a person talking on a cell phone: The California assemblywoman Shirley Weber calls on lawmakers to create a taskforce to study and develop reparations proposals for African Americans in June.


© Photograph: Rich Pedroncelli/AP
The California assemblywoman Shirley Weber calls on lawmakers to create a taskforce to study and develop reparations proposals for African Americans in June.

Reparations have been a controversial subject in the US for some time, especially amid the reckoning on racial injustice following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The Union general William Sherman’s promise of “40 acres and a mule” to newly freed people never came to fruition following the end of the American civil war in 1865, and instead, “our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions”, Newsom said.

California entered the US as a “free state” in 1850, 11 years before the start of the civil war. But its history with slavery was much more complicated than that, according to the California Historical Society. Many who took to the Sierra Nevada foothills during the Gold Rush in the years before California’s statehood brought enslaved people with them.

The state constitution proclaimed “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, unless for punishment of a crime, shall ever be tolerated”, yet the legislature passed a fugitive slave law “specifically targeting Blacks who escaped in California and had not fled from slave states”.

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Historic California law establishes path to reparations for Black people, descendants of slaves

California is the first state to adopt a law paving the way for Black residents and descendants of slaves to receive reparation payments.

The legislation, which was authored by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a Democrat representing San Diego and chair of California’s Legislative Black Caucus, does not commit to any specific payment. Instead, it establishes a nine-person task force that will study the impact of slavery on Black people in California and recommend to the Legislature what kind of compensation should be provided, who should receive it and what form that compensation will take.

Gov. Gavin Newson signed the law Wednesday afternoon.

“After watching last night’s debate, this signing can’t come too soon,” he said during a video conference with lawmakers and other stakeholders, including rapper Ice Cube, who used his celebrity to champion the bill.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive. Our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions,” Newsom said in a statement.

In a year filled with protests and calls for racial reckoning, the law received bipartisan support in the state Legislature. Advocates hope it will become a model for other states and make amends not just for slavery, but for some of the institutional practices that continued to disproportionately affect Black people in the U.S.

“This is an extremely important time for all of us,” Weber said Wednesday. “California tries to lead the way in terms of civil rights, and we have a responsibility to do that.”

Born in Arkansas, Weber said she and her family relocated to California because they saw “tremendous opportunity.” But, Weber added, California has more work to do in acknowledging the state’s history with race and inequality.

“California has come to terms with many of its issues, but it has yet to come to terms with its role in slavery,” she said. “After 400 years, we still have the impact.”

California was founded as a free state, or a state where slavery was illegal, in 1850, yet several laws made significant allowances for residents to retain enslaved people so long as they lived in California temporarily or purchased the slaves prior to statehood.

Slavery became illegal throughout the United States in 1865.

A similar proposal to study reparations for Black Americans was first introduced in Congress in 1989. It never passed, but Congress held a hearing on the proposal last year.

Weber’s bill was authored last year before the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody triggered national protests. It was also written before the coronavirus exposed disparities in the country’s health care system, which made testing, treatment and prevention less accessible to communities of color.

“This is not just because of the circumstances we face. What happened is that, of course, those circumstances reinforced the fact that what we were saying all along was true,” Weber said. “Some think we’re just responding

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Newsom signs law mandating more diversity in California corporate boardrooms

Many California corporations will have to increase the diversity of their boards of directors under a new law signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom to address a shortage of people of color in executive positions.



Gavin Newsom wearing a suit and tie: Gov. Gavin Newsom has acted on a bill requiring more diversity on corporate boards in California. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)


© (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)
Gov. Gavin Newsom has acted on a bill requiring more diversity on corporate boards in California. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

The law requires some 625 publicly held corporations headquartered in California to include at least one person from an underrepresented community by the end of next year, with additional appointments required in future years.

Newsom said during an online signing ceremony that the law is necessary to promote diversity in corporate boardrooms as part of a broader effort to improve racial equity in the U.S.

“When we talk about racial justice, we talk about empowerment, we talk about power, we need to talk about seats at the table,” Newsom said.

The new law is likely to be challenged in court by conservative groups including Judicial Watch, which sued to contest a 2018 law that required a minimum number of women on corporate boards.

“It’s a quota, and quotas are unconstitutional,” said Thomas Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, regarding the law signed by Newsom. Fitton made the same argument in a pending lawsuit about the law requiring women on corporate boards.

Fitton said his organization is reviewing the new law before deciding whether to go to court.

“We are deeply concerned about the new legislation,” Fitton said. “It’s a violation of the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution. It undermines the core legal concept of equal protection.”

Other constitutional law experts disagree that the measure is on weak ground, including Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the UC Berkeley School of Law. He said the laws on the subject are unclear and will have to be decided by the courts.

“I believe that there is a compelling need to enhance diversity on corporate boards,” Chemerinsky said. “The question is whether a court will find these laws to be sufficiently narrowly tailored. Because there are few other alternatives, I think there is a strong argument that such laws are constitutional.”

Under Assembly Bill 979, publicly held corporations headquartered in California are required to have at least one director from an underrepresented community by the close of 2021.

By the end of 2022, corporate boards with four to nine members must have two people from underrepresented communities, and those with more than nine members must have at least three people from those communities.

Directors from an underrepresented community include those who self-identify as Black, African American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian or Alaska Native, or who self-identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.

“While some corporations were already leading the way to combat implicit bias, now all of California’s corporate boards will better reflect the diversity of our state,” said Assemblyman Chris Holden (D-Pasadena), one of the authors of the bill, on Wednesday. “This is a win-win,

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A law-and-order California GOP congressional campaign is violating federal law

  • Buzz Patterson’s California congressional campaign hasn’t filed mandatory federal campaign finance disclosures since late 2019. His campaign tells Insider that ‘technological difficulties’ are the culprit.
  • It’s rare for a competitive congressional campaign to repeatedly miss these legally mandated filings. Patterson’s campaign could face a Federal Election Commission audit and significant fines.
  • How fast will Patterson file his campaign disclosures? As ‘soon as we can,’ he said.
  • Patterson, a Republican and decorated Air Force veteran, is challenging Democratic Rep. Ami Bera in California’s 7th congressional district.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Buzz Patterson has a fighting chance of becoming one of California’s newest congressional lawmakers.

But as the Sacramento-area Republican battles four-term Democratic Rep. Ami Bera, Patterson’s campaign committee is breaking federal law.

Patterson’s committee has failed to file four mandatory disclosures detailing how much money it’s raised and spent, as well as the identities of those funding and earning money from it, an Insider review of Federal Election Commission records indicates.

The missed filings, which span nearly a year, could trigger a costly FEC audit and hefty civil fine. The Department of Justice — responsible for prosecuting “knowing and willful” criminal violations of federal campaign laws — could also investigate, although it rarely pursues cases that strictly involve disclosure.

Patterson, who last week declared there “cannot be a Democratic Republic without law and order,” told Insider that he’s aware of his campaign’s screw-ups. He vowed to fix the situation.

“The onus is on my campaign and our inability to file on time,” Patterson said. “It was never our intention to be here, but we are and we know we must fix it. As soon as we can.”

Patterson campaign treasurer Lou Baglietto said a “series of technological difficulties” prevented the campaign from properly submitting its financial disclosures through the FEC’s internet-based document filing system. 

Baglietto said he didn’t realize that the FEC wasn’t receiving the campaign’s disclosures and recently discovered FEC error emails in his spam folder. He now plans to this week send the FEC a compact disc containing the campaign finances from late 2019 to the present.

“It’s my fault,” Baglietto said. “I thought everything was OK.”

Asked to estimate the Patterson campaign’s current finances, Baglietto told Insider that the campaign has raised about $220,000 and spent about $190,000 during the campaign. It currently has $30,000 in available cash, he said.

Earlier this year, one of Patterson’s campaign consultants sued the campaign for breach of contract, accusing it of not paying bills. Patterson previously called the lawsuit “frivolous,” the Orange County Register reported in May. The Patterson campaign’s yet-to-be-filed FEC documents would ostensibly reveal more details about this situation.

The Bera campaign entered July with nearly $1.9 million in reserve and about $273,000 in debt, according to its latest financial statement.

Potential ‘enforcement action’

FEC spokesperson Judith Ingram declined to discuss specifics of Patterson’s situation, but noted that “political committees are required to submit filings on time and in full in

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Uber, Lyft look to kill California law on app-based drivers

FILE - In this Oct. 29, 2019, file photo, Carla Shrive, right, who drives for various gig companies, joined other drivers to support a proposed ballot initiative challenging a recently signed law that makes it harder for companies to label workers as independent contractors, in Sacramento, Calif. A battle between the powerhouses of the so-called gig economy and big labor could become the most expensive ballot measure on Nov. 3, 2020, in California history. Voters are being asked to decide via Proposition 22 whether to create an exemption to a new state law aimed at providing wage and benefit protections to Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers.

FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2019, file photo, Carla Shrive, right, who drives for various gig companies, joined other drivers to support a proposed ballot initiative challenging a recently signed law that makes it harder for companies to label workers as independent contractors, in Sacramento, Calif. A battle between the powerhouses of the so-called gig economy and big labor could become the most expensive ballot measure on Nov. 3, 2020, in California history. Voters are being asked to decide via Proposition 22 whether to create an exemption to a new state law aimed at providing wage and benefit protections to Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers.

AP

Californians are being asked decide if Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers should remain independent contractors or be eligible for the benefits that come with being company employees.

The battle between the powerhouses of the so-called gig economy and labor unions including the International Brotherhood of Teamsters could become the most expensive ballot measure in state history. Voters are weighing whether to create an exemption to a new state law aimed at providing wage and benefit protections to drivers.

Uber and Lyft have fought a losing battle in the Legislature and courts, so now — with help from app-based food delivery companies DoorDash, Postmates and Instacart — they are spending more than $180 million to take their fight directly to voters in the Nov. 3 election.

Early voting in California starts Monday. Uber and Lyft, both headquartered in San Francisco, have said they may leave the state if the measure fails.

The landmark labor law known known as AB5 threatens to upend the app-based business model, which offers great flexibility to drivers who can work whenever they choose. But they forego protections like minimum wage, overtime, health insurance and reimbursement for expenses.

“What’s at stake is the future of labor, the nature of work, how conditions are changing for households amidst the pandemic and recession,” said David McCuan, chair of California’s Sonoma State University political science department.

Labor-friendly Democrats in the Legislature passed the law last year to expand upon a 2018 ruling by the California Supreme Court that limited businesses from classifying workers as independent contractors.

Uber and Lyft have maintained that their drivers meet the criteria to be independent contractors, not employees. They also have argued the law didn’t apply to them because they are technology companies, not transportation companies, and drivers are not a core part of their business.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra took the companies to court, and a San Francisco Superior Court judge ruled the companies are subject to the new employment standards. But that ruling has been put on hold while the companies appeal.

Any ruling could be undone by the outcome of the vote, though further litigation is likely.

If Proposition 22 passes, it would exempt app-based transportation and delivery companies from the labor law and drivers would remain independent contractors exempt from mandates for overtime, sick leave and expense reimbursement.

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Kobe Bryant crash prompts California law on unauthorized photos

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday approved legislation prompted by the helicopter crash that killed Kobe Bryant and eight other people that makes it a crime for first responders to take unauthorized photos of deceased people at the scene of an accident or crime.

Reports surfaced after the Jan. 26 crash that killed Bryant, his daughter Gianna and the others that graphic photos of the victims were being shared.

Eight deputies were accused of taking or sharing graphic photos of the scene, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva said then, adding that he had ordered the images deleted. He said the department has a policy against taking and sharing crime scene photos, but it did not apply to accident scenes.

REMEMBERING THE LEGEND: Kobe Bryant would have turned 42 in August

Scene of the hillside where the helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant crashed in Calabasas, California. (Photo: Jayne Kamin-Oncea, USA TODAY Sports)

The measure that will take effect Jan. 1 makes it a misdemeanor with fines up to $1,000 per offense to take such photos for anything other than an official law enforcement purpose.

Bryant’s widow, Vanessa Bryant, has sued the department over the photos.

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Fatal cases of COVID-19 at nursing facilities prompt new California law

With skilled nursing homes hit particularly hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a law requiring those facilities in California to report disease-related deaths to health authorities within 24 hours during declared emergencies.



a group of people that are standing in the grass: Patients were moved from Riverside's Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in April after staff failed to show up. Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law requiring the reporting of deaths during health emergencies. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)


© (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)
Patients were moved from Riverside’s Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in April after staff failed to show up. Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law requiring the reporting of deaths during health emergencies. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

The law was written in response to concerns that health agencies were slow to respond to outbreaks in skilled nursing facilities because they did not receive timely information about them.

So far, more than 5,630 residents and staff at skilled nursing facilities in the state have died from COVID-19 — 36% of California’s fatalities from the coronavirus. The percentage “reveals the significant weaknesses in the reporting system currently required by these facilities,” said Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg), who introduced the legislation.

COVID-19 outbreaks have occurred at some 1,164 skilled nursing homes and 379 assisted-living facilities in California, according to the state Department of Public Health. The spread at such facilities is alarming to health officials, who note that the virus is especially deadly for the elderly and for those with underlying medical problems.

Wood’s bill requires that records of deaths be compiled into a weekly report on the department’s website, and that residents of the facilities and their families be notified of COVID-19 cases.

“This data, which will be reported in a manner that protects an individual’s privacy, will help the state receive more timely data, helping us respond much more quickly to the spread of communicable diseases, such as COVID-19, and save lives,” said Wood, who is a dentist.

The measure, AB 2644, also puts into law current Department of Public Health guidance that facilities have a full-time staff member who is trained in infection prevention and control.

In the early weeks after the pandemic was declared in March, much of what the public knew about COVID-19 in nursing homes did not come from public health agencies but from relatives, staff members and facility administrators.

The state was slow to report to the public which skilled nursing facilities were dealing with outbreaks.

The reporting requirements in the new law will also help the state meet its mandate to send data on virus infections to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The measure was supported by groups advocating for the elderly, including the California Commission on Aging.

“This pandemic has highlighted the ongoing problems of poor infection control, understaffing and poor regulation of nursing homes here and across the nation,” Betsy Butler, the commission’s chairwoman, said in a letter to lawmakers, adding that the bill “takes meaningful steps to address these issues.”

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Uber, Lyft Look to Kill California Law on App-Based Drivers | Business News

By BRIAN MELLEY, Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Californians are being asked decide if Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers should remain independent contractors or be eligible for the benefits that come with being company employees.

The battle between the powerhouses of the so-called gig economy and labor unions including the International Brotherhood of Teamsters could become the most expensive ballot measure in state history. Voters are weighing whether to create an exemption to a new state law aimed at providing wage and benefit protections to drivers.

Uber and Lyft have fought a losing battle in the Legislature and courts, so now — with help from app-based food delivery companies DoorDash, Postmates and Instacart — they are spending more than $180 million to take their fight directly to voters in the Nov. 3 election.

Early voting in California starts Monday. Uber and Lyft, both headquartered in San Francisco, have said they may leave the state if the measure fails.

The landmark labor law known known as AB5 threatens to upend the app-based business model, which offers great flexibility to drivers who can work whenever they choose. But they forego protections like minimum wage, overtime, health insurance and reimbursement for expenses.

“What’s at stake is the future of labor, the nature of work, how conditions are changing for households amidst the pandemic and recession,” said David McCuan, chair of California’s Sonoma State University political science department.

Labor-friendly Democrats in the Legislature passed the law last year to expand upon a 2018 ruling by the California Supreme Court that limited businesses from classifying workers as independent contractors.

Uber and Lyft have maintained that their drivers meet the criteria to be independent contractors, not employees. They also have argued the law didn’t apply to them because they are technology companies, not transportation companies, and drivers are not a core part of their business.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra took the companies to court, and a San Francisco Superior Court judge ruled the companies are subject to the new employment standards. But that ruling has been put on hold while the companies appeal.

Any ruling could be undone by the outcome of the vote, though further litigation is likely.

If Proposition 22 passes, it would exempt app-based transportation and delivery companies from the labor law and drivers would remain independent contractors exempt from mandates for overtime, sick leave and expense reimbursement.

But it also would put in place policies that require those companies to provide “alternative benefits,” including a guaranteed minimum wage and subsidies for health insurance if they average 25 hours of work a week.

Supporters say drivers enjoy the independence and flexibility of the current model.

“If I want to work four hours and say, ‘I’m done,’ I can do that,” said Doug Mead, a Palm Springs retiree who delivers meals for Uber Eats and Postmates and estimates he makes about $24 an hour. “Where is there an employer on the planet where I can do that?”

Opponents say the companies exploit

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Land Trusts In California

One of the biggest question (if not the biggest) surrounding the entire topic of the Law of Attraction or The Secret, is time; how long does it take to manifest my needs? The college of thought based on the Law of Attraction tells us that “as we expect, so shall or not it’s.” The idea that we create our life experiences is reflected in generally-used phrases corresponding to “you reap what you sow” and “like attracts like.” The philosophy dates way back to Hermes Trismegistus’ Emerald Tablet (rediscovered in roughly 1350 BC).

It is the Law which regulates the structure of a rustic, the power and functions of government, right and duties of the individual and provides cures for unconstitutional acts. There are various times when a Federal or Postal worker is rarely knowledgeable of his or her separation from the Federal Government or the Postal Service.

Not all of us need to have our own weapons, but we wan’t our country. On this case, as the property is mechanically vested in the Settlor’s private representatives and the belief is constituted. Because the law stands at present a person should produce their own medical marijuana to legally get hold of medical marijuana.

Go to Contact Us” and ask them for a duplicate of their pamphlet Abstract of California Gun Laws & Fundamental Security Guidelines”. Second, petitioners have freedom and are deprived of liberty and property without due process and are denied the equal protection of the laws, each right in reality are guaranteed by the 14th Modification.

I discover the 2 laws about weapons fairly worrying. Other property – including belongings held jointly with one other individual, a “life property” reserved in a deed, and assets held in revocable and irrevocable trusts – have been excluded from estate restoration.…

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