Tag: deaths

Olivia’s law call aims to cut young driving deaths

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Olivia Alkir had plans to study architectural engineering at university

Family and friends of a sixth form student killed in a crash caused by two racing drivers are calling for a change in the law for new motorists.

Olivia Alkir, 17, of Efenechtyd, Denbighshire, was a passenger in a car that crashed while the driver was racing another car in June last year.

Drivers Edward Bell, who passed his driving test a day earlier, and Thomas Quick were jailed for five years.

Denbighshire councillors are being urged to back a petition to Parliament.

It calls for new young drivers to have a black box recorder fitted to their vehicles for the first year, to monitor their journeys.

The petition also wants newly-qualified motorists to be limited to one passenger, who must be a qualified driver.

  • Night driving ‘curfew’ for new drivers considered
  • The tech cutting driving costs for young motorists

Olivia’s Ysgol Brynhyfryd school friend Joe Hinchcliffe launched the petition that has been supported by Olivia’s parents Mesut and Jo.

It has attracted 8,500 signatures so far and needs to reach 10,000 for the UK government to respond to the request. If it reached 100,000 by February, it would lead to a debate in Parliament.

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Thomas Quick, 18, was jailed alongside Edward Bell for causing death by dangerous driving

The motion asking for support has been put forward by Ruthin councillor Huw Hilditch Roberts, who is the relative of another teenager injured in the fatal crash.

“These changes should significantly decrease the amount of young road crash fatalities by encouraging safer driving,” Mr Hilditch Roberts’ motion says.

It is due to discussed at a full meeting of Denbighshire council on Tuesday.

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Good Samaritan Society reports 7 COVID-19 deaths at Lennox location

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A sign thanking workers a the Good Samaritan Assisted Living complex is staked in the front yard on Friday, March 1, in Sioux Falls. (Photo: Erin Bormett / Argus Leader)

Seven residents of a senior living facility in Lennox have died from COVID-19, and five of those deaths have occurred in the past 10 days.

As of Friday afternoon, the Good Samaritan Society facility in Lennox has reported seven deaths and 14 active cases of COVID-19. Out of the active cases, nine are residents and five are staffers, said Tess Hedrick, senior media relations specialist for Sanford Health. The facility has reported 47 COVID-19 cases since March.

Todd Anderson, Good Samaritan Society Lennox administrator, said the facility is following CDC guidelines and using personal protective equipment.

“Staff members are screened daily, monitor their health and stay home if they feel sick or have symptoms,” Anderson said.

On Sept. 28, the Lennox facility was reporting 25 active cases and two deaths, Anderson said.

More: Daily COVID-19 cases reach record high again in South Dakota

The Lennox location has the most active cases out of all the Good Samaritan senior living facilities in the Sioux Falls area.

The Sioux Falls Village location on Marion Road in southwestern Sioux Falls has one active case, a resident. Since the pandemic began that location has seen 26 deaths out of 147 COVID-19 cases, Hedrick said. The Argus Leader reported 20 of those deaths occurred before May 12.

Luther Manor in Sioux Falls has no active cases and 12 total resident cases. Three residents have died. Sioux Falls Center has had three resident cases and one death, Hedrick said.

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ISIS fighters charges related to the hostage-taking and deaths of four Americans, the US government announced Wednesday.

Two high-profile ISIS fighters have been indicted on terrorism charges related to the hostage-taking and deaths of four Americans, the US government announced Wednesday.



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Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, who were part of an ISIS execution cell dubbed “the Beatles” because of their British accents, are expected to make their initial appearances in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, Wednesday afternoon. They are in FBI custody.

Kotey and Elsheikh are charged for their involvement in the hostage-taking and murders of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff and American aid workers Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller as well as British and Japanese nationals.

According to the indictment, they are charged with one count of conspiracy to commit hostage-taking resulting in death, four counts of hostage-taking resulting in death, one count of conspiracy to murder US citizens outside of the US, one count of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists — hostage-taking and murder — resulting in death, one count of conspiracy to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization resulting in death.

If convicted, Kotey and Elsheikh face a maximum penalty of life in prison for each count.

“My message to other terrorists is this — if you harm an American, you will face the same fate as these men. You will face American arms on the battlefield, and if you survive, you will face American justice in an American courtroom with the prospect of many years in an American prison. Either way, you will never live in peace — you will be pursued to the ends of the earth. No matter how long it may take, we will never forget, and we will never quit,” Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers said at a press conference Wednesday.

‘We will remember them for the way they lived their good and decent lives’

In his remarks, Demers called it a “good” but “solemn day.”

“Today we remember the four innocent Americans whose lives were taken by ISIS: James Wright Foley, Steven Joel Sotloff, Peter Edward Kassig, and Kayla Jean Mueller.”

“Many around the world are familiar with the barbaric circumstances of their deaths. But we will not remember these Americans for the way they died. We will remember them for the way they lived their good and decent lives.”

In a joint statement Wednesday released by the Foley Foundation, the families welcomed the news.

“James, Peter, Kayla and Steven were kidnapped, tortured, beaten, starved, and murdered by members of the Islamic State in Syria. Now our families can pursue accountability for these crimes against our children in a U.S. court,” they said.

“We are hopeful that the U.S. government will finally be able to send the important message that if you harm Americans, you will never escape justice. And when you are caught, you will face the full power of American law,” the Foleys, Sotloffs, Kassigs and Muellers said.

‘A brutal hostage-taking scheme’

The 24-page indictment alleges that Kotey and Elsheikh “were leading

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U.S. government tried to “intimidate” California county health department to keep poultry plant open after COVID deaths, director says

There have reportedly been tens of thousands of coronavirus cases at meat and poultry plants. More than 44,000 workers nationwide have tested positive for the virus, and more than 200 have died, according to the Food & Environment Reporting Network, an investigative nonprofit.

In late April, President Trump issued an executive order urging plants to stay open. Since then, CBS News has only been able to identify a couple of plants that were temporarily closed by government agencies due to COVID-19 outbreaks. One is the Foster Farms poultry plant in California’s Merced County.

Despite what it says was political pressure, the small county’s health department closed down the plant in Livingston for one week due to a COVID-19 outbreak that claimed some workers’ lives. 

One of those workers was Perla Meza’s 61-year-old father Filiberto, who she says worked unloading trucks at Foster Farms for years until he came down with COVID-19. 

“He was in quarantine for three days when everything got worse,” Meza said. 

In August, he went to the hospital and then into a coma for three days, Meza said. He later died.  

Some 2,600 people work at the plant. Merced County public health officials declared an outbreak there in late June, and during a visit, recommended Foster Farms test all of its workers, said department director Rebecca Nanyonjo-Kemp.

“You need to conduct universal screening of all of your staff. You have way too many staff here to be able to control one factor. You’re being controlled by the factors because you have so many people here,” Nanyonjo-Kemp said. “Don’t let your illness take over your facility.”

The plant said they would listen to the advice, Nanyonjo-Kemp said.

“Unfortunately, that did not materialize,” she told CBS News consumer investigative correspondent Anna Werner.

Only limited testing occurred, she said. In July, two workers died of COVID-19.  

The county continued to monitor the outbreak, and on August 7, Foster Farms provided a list showing the number of workers actively infected and those whose cases they described as “resolved.”

But county health officer Dr. Salvador Sandoval noticed the list contained no deaths, even though county health staff said workers had told them there were more.

So the health department emailed Foster Farms to ask if there were “any known deaths,” and the next week, received a new list. This time, Sandoval said, five names previously listed only as “resolved” were now listed as “deaths.”

The company put the names “in a category that made it difficult for our investigators to tag them as being people who had died,” Sandoval said.

He described what the company did as “misleading.” “I feel it’s wrong,” he said.

The company told CBS News, “There was no intentional effort on the part of Foster Farms to deceive the Merced (County) Public Health Department,” and said, “All issues related to the reporting of data were quickly resolved.”

But late in August, with eight deaths and over 350 confirmed cases, county health officials told Foster Farms the plant would

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