Tag: Digital

Salesforce Live – The Nottingham Building Society rethinks digital strategy in light of COVID-19

(Image sourced via The Nottingham Building Society Facebook )

The Nottingham Building Society was founded back in 1849 by a small group of Nottingham businessmen, led by local Quaker Samuel Fox. The first ever branch used to open between 6pm and 9pm on the first Tuesday of each month and the vision for the building society was to help people own their own home, as well as offer them a safe and secure place for their savings.

Since then The Nottingham (as it’s more commonly known) has grown to serve over a quarter of a million members across the UK and now has 67 branches across 11 counties. Gone too are the days of a three hour opening window once a month, with the building society expanding its use of digital services for members rapidly.

The Nottingham has had a digital strategy in place for over three years, which served it well in the initial fallout from COVID-19. But as CEO David Marlow outlined at the Salesforce Live UK & Ireland event this week, the rapid changes in consumer expectations and the workplace are forcing the building society to go deeper with its transformation.

Part of this involves moving to the Salesforce Financial Services Cloud to completely reengineer the organisation’s process for the digital, with the aim of creating an immersive experience for members.

Marlow explained that COVID-19 has shifted thinking at The Nottingham in two fundamental ways. Firstly, regarding the move to distributed working. And secondly, the additional expectations from consumers on digital services. He said:

I think the working from home element is a major item. Here I am at home, somebody who never worked from home over the last 20 years. How we make the most of that and leverage it is really important. Accommodating the changes that we see both positive and negative for people remote working. That implication has an enormous knock on effect to our business continuity arrangements, and we’ve got some big changes to put through in how we organise ourselves in business continuity terms. Just as example, historically we had a building on the outside of Nottingham that was just left empty. When we had a crisis we would all move out to that. Well, we don’t need that sort of capability any longer, we would all just work from home.

And then finally I think the major item for us has been the enormous shift in expectations from customers and members and the public at large around digital. Not only in terms of the access that they expect, but the richness of the service that they now see as the norm, not as a bonus.

A solid foundation

As noted above, The Nottingham has been working on its digital strategy for three years now and Marlow said that this put the organisation in a good position when demand for its services increased during the height of the pandemic. However, he added, that with the enormous shift in customer expectations, he soon

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China hands out $1.5m of digital currency in cashless society trial

  • Authorities in Shenzhen, southern China, have handed out $1.5 million of a new digital currency as part of a trial of a cashless society.
  • Last Friday authorities gave 50,000 lottery winners the equivalent of $30 each to spend digitally by October 16, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.
  • The digital currency is not like a cryptocurrency, and is issued and controlled by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.
  • The PBoC said it plans to formally launch the digital payment system in late 2020, according to the BBC.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Chinese city has handed out 10 million yuan, or $1.5 million, in digital currency to trial what citizens would do in a cashless society.

On Friday, 50,000 people living in the Luhou district of Shenzhen were given digital “red envelopes,” each containing around 200 yuan ($30) worth of the digital currency, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.

The digital currency not a cryptocurrency, like bitcoin or ethereum, but a digitized version of the country’s renminbi currency that is run by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.

The country’s four largest state-owned banks are taking part in the Shenzhen trial, China Daily reported.

The trial requires people to download the government’s digital currency app and spend their money between October 12 and October 16 in 3,000 participating stores in the district, CNBC and China Daily reported. One of those participating stores is Walmart, CNBC reported, citing the Shenzhen government.

FILE PHOTO:  A woman wearing a mask walks past the headquarters of the People's Bank of China, the central bank, in Beijing, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of the new coronavirus, February 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jason Lee/File Photo/File Photo

A pedestrian walks past the headquarters of the People’s Bank of China in Beijing on February 3, 2020. The PBoC is in charge of issuing the digital currency.

Reuters


So far, around 113,300 such digital currency apps — or “digital currency wallets” — have been set up in various pilot programs across China, with more than 1.1 billion yuan ($163 million) of transactions carried out so far, Fan Yifei, the PBoC’s deputy governor, told China Daily.

The Shenzhen pilot scheme appears to be the country’s largest so far, according to CNBC. Shenzhen is China’s tech hub, and home to companies like Tencent and Huawei.

According to The Guardian, some 2 million people in Luhou had applied to be part of the trial before 50,000 were selected.

The PBoC said it will formally launch the digital currency late this year, the BBC reported, but is yet to confirm a date.

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A Chinese city is handing out $1.5 million in digital ‘red envelopes’ to lottery winners to trial a cashless society



a view of a city with tall buildings in the background: Futian district in Shenzhen, China. A different district, Luhou, took part in the digital currency pilot. Prisma by Dukas/Universal Images Group via Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Futian district in Shenzhen, China. A different district, Luhou, took part in the digital currency pilot. Prisma by Dukas/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

  • Authorities in Shenzhen, southern China, have handed out $1.5 million of a new digital currency as part of a trial of a cashless society.
  • Last Friday authorities gave 50,000 lottery winners the equivalent of $30 each to spend digitally by October 16, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.
  • The digital currency is not like a cryptocurrency, and is issued and controlled by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.
  • The PBoC said it plans to formally launch the digital payment system in late 2020, according to the BBC.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Chinese city has handed out 10 million yuan, or $1.5 million, in digital currency to trial what citizens would do in a cashless society.

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On Friday, 50,000 people living in the Luhou district of Shenzhen were given digital “red envelopes,” each containing around 200 yuan ($30) worth of the digital currency, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.

The digital currency not a cryptocurrency, like bitcoin or ethereum, but a digitized version of the country’s renminbi currency that is run by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.

The country’s four largest state-owned banks are taking part in the Shenzhen trial, China Daily reported.

The trial requires people to download the government’s digital currency app and spend their money between October 12 and October 16 in 3,000 participating stores in the district, CNBC and China Daily reported. One of those participating stores is Walmart, CNBC reported, citing the Shenzhen government.



a statue in front of a building: A pedestrian walks past the headquarters of the People's Bank of China in Beijing on February 3, 2020. The PBoC is in charge of issuing the digital currency. Reuters


© Reuters
A pedestrian walks past the headquarters of the People’s Bank of China in Beijing on February 3, 2020. The PBoC is in charge of issuing the digital currency. Reuters

So far, around 113,300 such digital currency apps — or “digital currency wallets” — have been set up in various pilot programs across China, with more than 1.1 billion yuan ($163 million) of transactions carried out so far, Fan Yifei, the PBoC’s deputy governor, told China Daily.

The Shenzhen pilot scheme appears to be the country’s largest so far, according to CNBC. Shenzhen is China’s tech hub, and home to companies like Tencent and Huawei.

According to The Guardian, some 2 million people in Luhou had applied to be part of the trial before 50,000 were selected.

The PBoC said it will formally launch the digital currency late this year, the BBC reported, but is yet to confirm a date.

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Japan must revise BOJ law to speed digital yen, enshrine inflation goal: senior official

By Leika Kihara and Takahiko Wada



Kozo Yamamoto wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Yamamoto speaks in Tokyo


© Reuters/Kim Kyung Hoon
FILE PHOTO: Yamamoto speaks in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan must swiftly revise laws to allow the central bank to issue a digital currency, a move that could provide a chance to reform the Bank of Japan’s existing mandates and enshrine its inflation target, a senior ruling party official said on Monday.

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Kozo Yamamoto, head of the Liberal Democratic Party’s (LDP) council on financial affairs, said the BOJ risked being overtaken by private players who could launch their own digital currencies that could undermine the yen.

“If something too convenient pops up from the private sector, people might start to doubt whether they need yen as a currency unit. We must prevent this from happening,” he said. “This is fundamentally about protecting Japan’s currency sovereignty.”

Yamamoto said he would prod the government and relevant agencies to speed up efforts to draft a revised BOJ law and other necessary legislation for issuing central bank digital currencies (CBDC).

However, more broadly, Yamamoto has been a vocal advocate of making changes to the BOJ law, which sets out the central bank’s mandates.

Revising the law to include digital currencies would also present a good opportunity to make other changes such as adding an inflation target and job creation to the mandates, much like the U.S. Federal Reserve, he added.

“The new law should also clarify that 2% inflation is the BOJ’s policy target,” he told Reuters.

The BOJ does currently set 2% as its inflation target, introduced in 2013. But the target is not stipulated under the BOJ law, which says only that its role is to ensure Japan’s price moves and financial system are stable.

Central banks globally have been reviewing their strategic goals, with the European Central Bank widely expected to follow in the footsteps of the Fed in aiming for inflation of 2% on average, meaning that periods when prices grow too slowly can be compensated for with faster increases at another time.

‘TOO LATE’

Central banks began looking closely at digital currencies after Facebook last year announced its yet-to-be-launched digital token Libra that would be backed by a mixture of major currencies and government debt.

Japan has been cautious about moving too quickly on digital currencies given the social disruptions it could cause in a country that has the world’s most cash-loving population.

But China’s steady progress toward issuing digital currencies has prompted the government to reconsider, and pledge in this year’s policy platform to look more closely at the idea.

Other major central banks have also accelerated studies on CBDCs, given the recent rapid innovation in financial technology.

The BOJ said on Friday it would begin experimenting in the next fiscal year on how to operate its own digital currency.

Yamamoto said the BOJ’s timeframe was “too late,” adding that the first phase of tests should begin during the current fiscal year to March 2021.

CBDCs would also help regional banks, reeling from shrinking margins due

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NIC Secures New Contracts in Florida and Iowa for Payment Processing and Digital Government Solutions

Digital government solutions firm NIC Inc. has won new multi-year contracts with the states of Florida and Iowa following competitive bid processes.

“We are excited by the confidence Florida and Iowa have placed in NIC solutions as we continue to expand our payment processing and digital government services across the country,” said Harry Herington, NIC CEO and Chairman of the Board. “These wins further reinforce the momentum NIC has experienced in 2020.”

In Florida, NIC has been awarded a contract to provide transaction-funded payment processing services for all state agencies. The five-year transaction-funded contract, which may be extended by up to five additional years, also provides the ability for cities and municipalities to work with NIC for payment processing services, promoting a comprehensive and seamless financial transaction experience for Florida citizens and businesses.

For its fiscal year ended June 2018, the state of Florida processed 74 million transactions for a total of $52 billion in payments across 19 state agencies and processed 21 million transactions for a total of more than $1 billion across more than 90 localities.

In Iowa, NIC will once again serve as the state’s enterprise digital government solutions partner after a 15-year partnership concluded in 2017. Under the new five-year transaction-funded contract, which includes five one-year renewal options, NIC’s Des Moines-based team will work with state leadership to consolidate digital services into a unified experience for all Iowans.

“We are very excited for our digital solutions partnership with NIC in Iowa, first starting with payment processing services,” said Annette Dunn, Iowa’s Chief Information Officer. “We have many large agencies across the state that can benefit not only from a strategic, streamlined approach to payment processing but also from the many digital solutions NIC provides. These solutions happen to align perfectly with Governor Reynolds’ vision for the state, where technology is centered around the citizen and all transactions are stored in a digital wallet.”

About NIC Inc.

NIC (Nasdaq: EGOV) is a leading digital government solutions and payments company, serving more than 7,000 federal, state and local government agencies across the nation. With headquarters in Olathe, Kan., NIC partners with the majority of U.S. states to deliver user-friendly digital services that make it easier and more efficient to interact with government – providing valuable conveniences like applying for unemployment insurance, submitting business filings, renewing licenses, accessing information and making secure payments without visiting a government office. In the COVID-19 era and beyond, NIC helps government agencies rapidly deliver digital solutions to provide essential services to citizens and businesses alike. Having served the public sector for nearly 30 years, NIC continues to evolve with its federal, state and local government partners to deliver innovative and cost-effective digital government to constituents. Learn more at www.egov.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201007005965/en/

Contacts

Kara Cowie | NIC Inc.
Director of Corporate Communications
816-813-2350 | [email protected]

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