Tag: director

After vandals target Oregon Historical Society, director vows, ‘Our mission will be undeterred’

Amid violent protests Sunday night in downtown Portland, several prominent statues were toppled, windows at Portland State University were smashed and police said gunshots were fired into an empty restaurant.

But the vandalism that seemed to gather the most ire from city and state officials occurred at the Oregon Historical Society, a bastion of diverse artifacts and exhibits on the 1200 block of Southwest Park Avenue.

Nearly a dozen windows in the institution’s pavilion were smashed, said Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. Flares were tossed into the lobby, and a priceless quilt was taken. Preliminary estimates to repair the damage were about $25,000, Tymchuk told The Oregonian/OregonLive, though costs could end up higher.

The vandalism occurred during a protest organizers billed as an “Indigenous Day of Rage.” The action was eventually declared a riot, and three people were arrested.

Tymchuk was troubled that the society was targeted, especially given the institution’s recent efforts to tell a full and complete version of Oregon’s history, which is replete with ugly instances of white supremacy.

“We have been doing so much in leading the conversation, the uncomfortable conversation, on Oregon’s past and telling the unvarnished truth through our programming, exhibits, lectures and publications,” Tymchuk said.

Late last year, the society devoted an entire issue of its quarterly publication to Oregon’s unseemly history of racism. Earlier this year, the institution unveiled a permanent exhibit, meant to be the cornerstone of the museum, called “Experience Oregon.” Tymchuk said curators worked diligently with Oregon’s nine federally recognized tribes “to make sure we were telling their story correctly and accurately.”

The quilt taken from the society’s lobby was a bicentennial heritage quilt, stitched by 15 African American women in the mid-1970s. The artifact had traveled the nation before going on display in Portland.

It was the society’s commitment to featuring exhibits that showed the diversity in Oregon’s history that made the vandalism so hard to fathom, said Rep. Tawna Sanchez, a descendent of the Shoshone-Bannock, Ute and Carrizo tribes who represents parts of North and Northeast Portland.

“The fact that someone would hijack Indigenous People’s Day to commit more violence is not appropriate,” she said at a Monday morning news conference. “The destruction of the Oregon Historical Society in any way, shape or form is unconscionable because that place is so amazingly part of the actual truth of our state.”

Amid the shattered glass and singed carpet were elements of hope, though. The windows could be repaired and none of the exhibits were damaged. Tymchuk said police recovered the stolen quilt a few blocks from the museum, wet but mostly undamaged.

Tymchuk has been inundated with texts and emails of support as news of the vandalism has spread, but when he arrived at the society Monday morning, he found a handwritten note on a napkin, wrapped around a single dollar bill.

“Hello,” the note began. “I’m homeless so I dont have much to give to you, just some of my bottle collecting money, but I saw your windows

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“I wish for a more inclusive society,” says Hichki director Siddharth P. Malhotra, who wants to make the world a happier place with his brand of cinema : Bollywood News

With his critically acclaimed superhit Hichki, Siddharth P. Malhotra has established himself as a film-maker who has a distinct voice in Bollywood. The director is celebrating his birthday with his parents today and he spoke to us on his career milestone moments. Read on…

"I wish for a more inclusive society," says Hichki director Siddharth P. Malhotra, who wants to make the world a happier place with his brand of cinema

What has been your career milestone moments and how does Hichki fit into those moments particularly?

My career milestone moments, I think I started with TV. My TV milestones, I created some kind of pathbreaking TV which I am still known for, Sanjivani or Dil Mil Gaye or Ek Haazaron main Meri Behna Hai or Ek Hasina Thi, Dil Dosti Dance these were shows which created a new niche and are still remembered including the new ones which I’ve created now, so I did a comical take on Naagin called the Ichhapyaari Naagin, so I think career milestones moments, I got to work with Sooraj Barjatiya, as a associate director in Vivah, I got to work with Karan in Kal Ho Na Ho, I got to direct We are Family so that was a milestone moment when you get to direct Kajol and Kareena in one film with Arjun, for Karan Johar. Karan is someone I’ve always looked upto.

How does Hichki fit into these moments – Hichiki is basically about befriending your tourette, and when I’m saying tourette, all of us have Tourette. Tourette’s are our weak points, are thoese points which people don’t really want to look at and accept . After We are Family didn’t do well, I went through a pretty dark phase in my life, a phase where I almost attempted suicide twice. At that point, Hichki was the only film I wanted to say and no one was letting me say it. Everybody wanted to change the script, somebody wanted Tourettes out of the film, somebody wanted 9F out of the film, no one was seeming to get it and what was happening is that everytime I would leave that script and do something else, I would come back to Hichki. And then one day how Naina Mathur in the film got this class, I got Aditya Chopra in my life. He came into my life, he heard the script, he said I’ve not seen We are Family but the way you’ve narrated Hichki, I’m pretty sure you will make a good film out of this, and please dont change anything and make the film you want to make. Those were music to my ears. Looking back, Hichki actually made me understand and accept myself and befriend my tourettes and also find my voice as a director .

You gave India a sensitive, progressive, inclusive film with Hichki – do you wish for a more inclusive society on your birthday?

I really wish for a more inclusive society in every way. May it be gender, may it be religion, I really believe in the triumph of Human Spirit. There is nothing bigger than humanity

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Secret Society of Second-Born Royals Director on Planning Sequels

secret-society-of-second-born-royals-cast-sliceFrom director Anna Mastro and based on an original story by Alex Litvak, Andrew Green and Austin Winsberg, the Disney+ original film Secret Society of Second-Born Royals follows Sam (Peyton Elizabeth Lee), a rebellious teenager whose royal lineage makes her second-born status something of an afterthought to her family. But when she learns that she has superpowers because of a genetic trait attributed only to those that are like her, it’s up to her to find her inner superhero and create her own legacy.

During this 1-on-1 phone interview with Collider, filmmaker Anna Mastro talked about how she got attached to direct this project, blending the royal family genre with the superhero genre, the elements of the story that most spoke to her, the journey she’s taken as a director, how much the script changes over the course of making the movie, assembling this team of young actors, setting up a possible new franchise, and what she’d like to do next.

secret-society-of-second-born-royals-peyton-elizabeth-lee-image

Image via Disney+

Collider: How did this project and script come your way? Was it a random opportunity or were you looking for something like this?

ANNA MASTRO: Well, I’m always looking for inventive coming of age stories and I am always looking for things that involve action and teenage girls, especially. I had been looking for something to do with Disney for awhile and an exec who works there had been my boss’ assistant at an agency, probably 19 years ago, and every job she goes to, she sends me a project. This project, I thought was great. I thought it had so much potential. I thought it was pretty interesting. I loved the idea of doing original IP, especially for Disney. And so, it seemed like this really cool opportunity.

It’s cool because it’s this original thing, but then it also blends the royal family genre with the superhero genre, in a way that seems really new.

MASTRO: Thank you. That was definitely the goal. I just wanted to elevate what’s been in this space before but doing it in a different way and with a really diverse cast. I think that was exciting.

Were there elements about the story itself or the specific characters that most appealed to you and that you thought were most interesting?

MASTRO: Yeah, I love that idea of a kid in that coming of age genre, who’s looking for their place and they feel like they don’t fit in, within their family, within their world, and within their friend group. They just feel different and it makes them feel like something’s wrong with them. I think a major theme about this movie is that when you figure out really what makes you different or unique, that’s what makes you special and you’ll figure out what you can do with that. That theme was the one that really stuck out to me.

secret-society-of-second-born-royals-cast-02

Image via Disney+

You directed a movie early on in your career, but then did a

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Amanda Yancey named Executive Director for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Georgia – South Carolina Region

ATLANTA, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Amanda Yancey has been named the executive director of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) Georgia – South Carolina Region, as of September 1, 2020. Yancey takes the position from Piper Medcalf, who was promoted to a national position within the organization.

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society logo (PRNewsfoto/The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society)

Yancey joined LLS in 2011 with LLS’s Team In Training campaign. Since then, she has held leadership positions in Advancement and in the fundraising campaigns Man & Woman of the Year and Students of the Year. Most recently, she was a senior director, responsible for overseeing three large campaigns in Atlanta with a combined revenue goal of over $4,000,000. During her tenure as senior director, Yancey had exceptional success growing corporate and volunteer leadership and experienced exponential revenue growth in all areas. In particular, she grew the Atlanta Man & Woman of the Year campaign from $1,100,000 to $2,400,000 and recruited and managed two national title winners, including the 2020 National LLS Man of the Year All-Star, who raised over $420,000.

In addition to LLS, Yancey worked as the development director for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, where she was responsible for their endurance programs and special events. Yancey graduated from Georgia College & State University with a Bachelors of Science in Psychology.

“I am thrilled for this opportunity to continue my career with LLS and honored that I was chosen to lead the strong team already in place in the Georgia – South Carolina Region. Together, we will move the LLS mission forward getting us closer to a world without cancer,” said Yancey.

About The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society® (LLS) is a global leader in the fight against cancer. The LLS mission: cure leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care.

Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit www.LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., ET.

The GeorgiaSouth Carolina (GA-SC) Region of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, headquartered in Atlanta, helps those diagnosed with blood cancers with financial and emotional support through a variety of programs. including the Patti Robinson Kaufmann First Connection Program, the Susan Lang Pay-It-Forward Patient Travel Assistance Program, and the Urgent Need Program, which last year provided over $400,000 to patients region-wide. Currently, the GA-SC Region is funding $3.7 million towards research grants in multi-year agreements with Emory Winship Cancer Institute. Each year in the GA-SC Region, over 8,500 people are diagnosed with a blood cancer, and over 2,500 patients do not survive their disease.

Contact: Carey Stadler
[email protected] 404-720-7884

 

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Amanda Yancey named Executive Director for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Georgia – South Carolina Region | News

ATLANTA, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Amanda Yancey has been named the executive director of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) Georgia – South Carolina Region, as of September 1, 2020. Yancey takes the position from Piper Medcalf, who was promoted to a national position within the organization.

Yancey joined LLS in 2011 with LLS’s Team In Training campaign. Since then, she has held leadership positions in Advancement and in the fundraising campaigns Man & Woman of the Year and Students of the Year. Most recently, she was a senior director, responsible for overseeing three large campaigns in Atlanta with a combined revenue goal of over $4,000,000. During her tenure as senior director, Yancey had exceptional success growing corporate and volunteer leadership and experienced exponential revenue growth in all areas. In particular, she grew the Atlanta Man & Woman of the Year campaign from $1,100,000 to $2,400,000 and recruited and managed two national title winners, including the 2020 National LLS Man of the Year All-Star, who raised over $420,000.

In addition to LLS, Yancey worked as the development director for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, where she was responsible for their endurance programs and special events. Yancey graduated from Georgia College & State University with a Bachelors of Science in Psychology.

“I am thrilled for this opportunity to continue my career with LLS and honored that I was chosen to lead the strong team already in place in the Georgia – South Carolina Region. Together, we will move the LLS mission forward getting us closer to a world without cancer,” said Yancey.

About The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society® (LLS) is a global leader in the fight against cancer. The LLS mission: cure leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care.

Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit www.LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., ET.

The GeorgiaSouth Carolina (GA-SC) Region of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, headquartered in Atlanta, helps those diagnosed with blood cancers with financial and emotional support through a variety of programs. including the Patti Robinson Kaufmann First Connection Program, the Susan Lang Pay-It-Forward Patient Travel Assistance Program, and the Urgent Need Program, which last year provided over $400,000 to patients region-wide. Currently, the GA-SC Region is funding $3.7 million towards research grants in multi-year agreements with Emory Winship Cancer Institute. Each year in the GA-SC Region, over 8,500 people are diagnosed with a blood cancer, and over 2,500 patients do not survive their disease.

Contact: Carey Stadler
[email protected] 404-720-7884

 

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U.S. government tried to “intimidate” California county health department to keep poultry plant open after COVID deaths, director says

There have reportedly been tens of thousands of coronavirus cases at meat and poultry plants. More than 44,000 workers nationwide have tested positive for the virus, and more than 200 have died, according to the Food & Environment Reporting Network, an investigative nonprofit.

In late April, President Trump issued an executive order urging plants to stay open. Since then, CBS News has only been able to identify a couple of plants that were temporarily closed by government agencies due to COVID-19 outbreaks. One is the Foster Farms poultry plant in California’s Merced County.

Despite what it says was political pressure, the small county’s health department closed down the plant in Livingston for one week due to a COVID-19 outbreak that claimed some workers’ lives. 

One of those workers was Perla Meza’s 61-year-old father Filiberto, who she says worked unloading trucks at Foster Farms for years until he came down with COVID-19. 

“He was in quarantine for three days when everything got worse,” Meza said. 

In August, he went to the hospital and then into a coma for three days, Meza said. He later died.  

Some 2,600 people work at the plant. Merced County public health officials declared an outbreak there in late June, and during a visit, recommended Foster Farms test all of its workers, said department director Rebecca Nanyonjo-Kemp.

“You need to conduct universal screening of all of your staff. You have way too many staff here to be able to control one factor. You’re being controlled by the factors because you have so many people here,” Nanyonjo-Kemp said. “Don’t let your illness take over your facility.”

The plant said they would listen to the advice, Nanyonjo-Kemp said.

“Unfortunately, that did not materialize,” she told CBS News consumer investigative correspondent Anna Werner.

Only limited testing occurred, she said. In July, two workers died of COVID-19.  

The county continued to monitor the outbreak, and on August 7, Foster Farms provided a list showing the number of workers actively infected and those whose cases they described as “resolved.”

But county health officer Dr. Salvador Sandoval noticed the list contained no deaths, even though county health staff said workers had told them there were more.

So the health department emailed Foster Farms to ask if there were “any known deaths,” and the next week, received a new list. This time, Sandoval said, five names previously listed only as “resolved” were now listed as “deaths.”

The company put the names “in a category that made it difficult for our investigators to tag them as being people who had died,” Sandoval said.

He described what the company did as “misleading.” “I feel it’s wrong,” he said.

The company told CBS News, “There was no intentional effort on the part of Foster Farms to deceive the Merced (County) Public Health Department,” and said, “All issues related to the reporting of data were quickly resolved.”

But late in August, with eight deaths and over 350 confirmed cases, county health officials told Foster Farms the plant would

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