Tag: job

Ballet dancer could reskill with job in cyber security, suggests UK government ad | Oliver Dowden

The culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, has condemned a “crass” advertising campaign which suggested a ballet dancer could “reboot” their career by moving into cyber security.

The advert, part of the government’s Cyber First campaign, featured a young dancer tying up her ballet pumps alongside the caption: “Fatima’s next job could be in cyber (she just doesn’t know it yet).”

It adds the slogan: “Rethink. Reskill. Reboot.”

The poster, one of a series which featured people from a variety of other professions, was heavily criticised on social media, prompting the intervention from Dowden.

The government has been approached for more information about when the campaign launched.

Among the critics was the singer Darren Hayes, who posted on Twitter: “Stick with your dreams, don’t listen to this shit campaign written by people who, when not working, turn to the arts – music, tv, film, theatre, dance, photography, etc etc for joy. Making joy is our job. Reboot your terrible advertisement.”

Author Caitlin Moran responded: “I don’t know if the government know they appear to have recently created a ‘Hopes & Dreams Crushing Department’, but for a country already depressed and anxious, I would suggest it’s a bit of a ‘Not now, dudes’ moment?”

The shadow mental health minister, Dr Rosena Allin-Khan, tweeted: “Fatima, you be you. Don’t let anyone else tell you that you aren’t good enough because you don’t conform to their preconceived social norms.”

Shortly after “Fatima” began trending on Twitter, Dowden responded: “To those tweeting re #Fatima. This is not something from DCMS & I agree it was crass. This was a partner campaign encouraging people from all walks of life to think about a career in cyber security.”

He added: “I want to save jobs in the arts”, pointing to the government’s culture recovery fund, which announced its first recipients on Monday.

The controversy came after the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, denied encouraging workers in the struggling arts industry to retrain.

Sunak insisted he was talking generally about the need for some workers to “adapt” and suggested there would be “fresh and new opportunities” available for those who could not do their old jobs.

According to Arts Council England, the arts and culture industry contributes more than £10bn a year to the UK economy, with £3 spent on food, drink, accommodation and travel for every £1 spent on theatre tickets.

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UK government expands its job support program with stricter virus lockdowns due next week

The U.K. government has expanded its jobs support program as the country gears up for tighter coronavirus restrictions set to be announced next week.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak leaves 10 Downing Street after attending a Cabinet meeting on 14 February, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak leaves 10 Downing Street after attending a Cabinet meeting on 14 February, 2020.

Finance Minister Rishi Sunak said Friday that firms whose premises have to shut over the winter period as part of local or national restrictions will receive grants to pay the wages of staff who cannot work.

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Two weeks ago, Sunak announced the Job Support Scheme — a new emergency package of measures to contain unemployment, replacing the U.K.’s furlough scheme which is due to expire at the end of October.

It will directly top up the wages of employees working fewer hours due to suppressed business demand, enabling workers to keep their jobs on shorter hours rather than being made redundant.

The original furlough scheme in the summer had subsidized 80% of wages for millions of workers furloughed as a result of the pandemic. But Sunak confirmed in July that it would be wound down as the country began to emerge from coronavirus lockdown measures.

—CNBC’s Elliot Smith contributed to this article.

This is a breaking news story, please check back for more

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Australia to Run Record Budget Deficit as Government Cuts Tax, Boosts Job Support | Investing News

By Sam Holmes and Colin Packham

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia pledged billions in tax cuts and measures to boost jobs on Tuesday to help pull the economy out of its historic COVID-19 slump in a budget that tips the country into its deepest deficit on record.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s conservative government has unleashed A$300 billion in emergency stimulus to prop up growth this year, having seen the coronavirus derail a previous promise to return the budget to surplus.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg on Tuesday announced A$17.8 billion in personal tax cuts and A$5.2 billion in new programmes to boost employment in a recovery plan aimed at creating one million new jobs over the next four years.

Those measures are forecast to push the budget deficit out to a record A$213.7 billion, or 11% of gross domestic product, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2021.

“There is no economic recovery without a jobs recovery,” Frydenberg said in prepared remarks to parliament. “There is no budget recovery without a jobs recovery.”

Australia’s unemployment rate hit a 22-year high of 7.5% in July as businesses and borders closed due to strict lockdown measures to deal with the coronavirus.

While the number of deaths and infections in Australia from COVID-19 has been low compared with many other countries, the hit to GDP has been severe. Underlying the budget forecasts was an assumption that a vaccine would be developed in 2021.

Australia’s A$2 trillion economy shrank 7% in the three months ended June, the most since records began in 1959.

In its new projections, the government expects unemployment to rise to 7.25% by the end of the current fiscal year and then fall to 6% by June 2023. Australia’s GDP is expected to shrink 1.5% for the current fiscal year before returning to growth of 4.75% in the next.

S&P Global Ratings said Australia remained only one of 11 countries with the highest credit rating of AAA, albeit with a negative outlook, and said fiscal recovery would take years.

“While debt is markedly higher than the past, servicing costs remain manageable, as the interest-rate environment will remain favourable for a number of years,” said Anthony Walker, a director at the rating agency.

Gross debt is projected to surpass A$1 trillion in 2021/22, from A$684 billion in 2019/20, and then rise to around A$1.14 trillion by 2023/24.

The government said it will spend A$4 billion over the next year to pay businesses that hire those under the age of 35 as it targets youth unemployment.

The budget also brings forward previously legislated tax cuts for middle-income earners and extends tax breaks for individuals offered in last year’s budget for low- and middle-income earners.

Some of these cuts will be retrospectively backdated to July 1, 2020.

The government’s highly expansionary budget comes shortly after the central bank’s policy decision on Tuesday, at which it kept interest rates at a record low and flagged reducing high unemployment rate as a national priority.

The Reserve Bank of Australia

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Why thousands of labor activists protest Indonesia Job Creation Law

Bandung and Jakarta, Indonesia

Thousands of Indonesian students and workers protested on Wednesday against a new law they say will cripple labor rights and harm the environment, with some clashing with police. 

The new Job Creation Law, which was approved Monday, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labor system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labor Law, the Spatial Planning Law, and Environmental Management Law.

It is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people. Supporters of the law say it will increase employment at a time when a recession looms and when Indonesia is competitively falling behind other Southeast Asian countries.

Seven parties in the House of Representatives approved the legislation while two others rejected it, with their members walking out of the plenary session.

The Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions, known as KSPI, said about 2 million workers representing 32 labor unions would take part in mass rallies and strikes in various cities for several days starting Tuesday.

Authorities in Bandung, the capital of West Java province, blocked streets leading to the local parliament building and city hall, where clashes between rock-throwing students and riot police broke out late Tuesday when police tried to disperse the protesters.

On Wednesday, more than 3,000 protesters, including workers and high school and university students, attempted to reach the heavily guarded parliament building. Protesters set fires to tires near blocked streets and pelted police with rocks and gasoline bombs and broke down a gate of the parliament compound. Riot police responded by firing tear gas and water cannons.

Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Jakarta’s satellite cities of Tangerang and Bekasi where large factories are located, and many cities on Sumatra and Sulawesi islands.

National Police spokesman Argo Yuwono said riot police used only tear gas and rubber bullets in dispersing the protesters. He said authorities are still investigating the violence in Bekasi in which both students and police were injured.

Mr. Yuwono urged protesters to convey their views in an orderly and good mannered way, and always wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Thousands of workers from factories in Karawang, in West Java, and Serang, in Banten province, also protested outside their factories.

Police in the capital, Jakarta, prevented labor groups from holding a mass rally in front of Parliament.

KSPI President Said Iqbal released a statement saying the new law will hurt workers, including by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labor by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly wages into hourly wages.

“We reject the entire contents of the omnibus law which is very detrimental to workers,” Mr. Iqbal said. “It must be canceled immediately. The workers are already suffering a lot from the COVID-19 crisis.”

Some academics from prominent universities also expressed disappointment on

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‘Danger sign’: State, local government job losses grow as Congress stalls on relief

The new data undercut a Republican argument that state and local governments have gotten enough help from Washington, with some citing an uptick in revenue for many states this summer that outpaced initial projections. But the job losses suggest that economic relief that Congress approved in the CARES Act in late March gave a temporary boost to local economies that’s now drying up.

Not all Republicans have rejected more state aid outright. In an interview, Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) cited three Republican cosponsors — Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi and Susan Collins of Maine — for his bill to provide $500 billion in flexible grants to help state and local governments.

“One of the lessons we should take from the Great Recession was that massive layoffs and tax increases at the state and local level acted as an anchor and weighed down our economic recovery for years to come,” Menendez said. “We shouldn’t repeat that.”

He pointed to a Moody’s Analytics report this month that predicted the fiscal shock for state and local governments could run as high as $450 billion, or 2.2 percent of the economy. However, that figure assumes an additional stimulus, projected at approximately $1.5 trillion, from the federal government arriving sometime in the fall.

Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), a member of the House Republican leadership and a senior appropriator, told POLITICO that if lawmakers fail to reach agreement soon, the economy could “lose the momentum that we created over the summer.”

“There’s a lot of things that were actually generating revenue for states that are ending,” Cole said, referring to unemployment benefits, stimulus checks and coronavirus support funds.

Even though many of his fellow Republicans think no more aid is needed, the “political reality is if you want a package, there’s going to have to be state and local and tribal aid in it, period,” Cole said.

Meanwhile, local budget officials have kept up a steady call for more aid. They also warn that federal funds already provided can’t be used the same way by all states.

Colorado Treasurer Dave Young said that even though the state managed to fill shortfalls earlier this year using reserves, the drawdown led to automatic spending cuts because a certain level of reserve funds is required by statute.

Young said the state also has difficulty using the Municipal Liquidity Facility, which the Federal Reserve set up in April as a backstop emergency lending source for states in financial distress. With so few states using the facility, Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) has suggested that officials wind it down.

But Young said the facility, which lends short-term debt at above-market rates to be paid off over a maximum of three years, isn’t a viable option for Colorado, because state law requires that any borrowing must be paid off in the same fiscal year it is made.

“When they say, ‘Well, you’re not utilizing it!’ Well, there’s a number of reasons we’re not utilizing it. None of them have

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