Tag: Research

Syneos Health Wins Society for Clinical Research Sites Eagle Award for Fourth Consecutive Year

MORRISVILLE, N.C., Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Syneos Health® (Nasdaq:SYNH), the only fully integrated biopharmaceutical solutions organization, today announced that it was awarded the Society for Clinical Research Sites (SCRS) Eagle Award, sweeping the CRO category for the fourth consecutive year. Presented at SCRS’s Global Site Solutions Summit, the award recognizes the CRO that best exemplifies a site-focused approach to clinical trial management, demonstrating outstanding leadership, professionalism, integrity, passion and dedication to advancing the clinical research profession through strong site partnerships.

“We are honored that sites have consistently selected Syneos Health as their CRO of choice in recent years, pointing to the progress we’ve made in streamlining pain points in the clinical trial process,” said Tara Fitzgerald, President, Clinical Development Services, Syneos Health, who accepted the award on behalf of the company at the Summit. “It’s especially humbling in a year where we’ve been proud to work side-by-side with sites to navigate the challenges of COVID-19, transforming approaches to deliver impact for patients and continuing to unlock data to change lives. We thank our dedicated employees and the investigative sites we work with who continuously strive to improve the clinical development process.”

This year’s winners were selected by investigative sites – nearly 10,000 research sites in 47 countries – who voted for the CRO they believe best demonstrates a strong commitment to site partnerships. Selection criteria included availability of qualified staff to support sites, willingness to collaborate, protocol design and execution, financial consideration and partnering with sites for future work.

“Syneos Health has won the SCRS Eagle Award for three previous years in the CRO category, and this fourth win is in a very different landscape,” said Allyson Small, SCRS COO. “The pandemic disruption stretched operational systems in clinical research, making relationships critically important, with the sites recognizing Syneos Health in particular for their prioritization of the site partnership.”  

Learn more about Syneos Heath’s site and patient engagement programs, including the Company’s Catalyst Site Program that delivers proven predictability in clinical trial delivery for for Early Phase, Oncology, Psychiatry, Vaccine, Ophthalmology and Post-Operative Pain and Pain trials: syneoshealth.com/catalyst

About Syneos Health
Syneos Health (Nasdaq:SYNH) is the only fully integrated biopharmaceutical solutions organization. Our company, including a Contract Research Organization (CRO) and Contract Commercial Organization (CCO), is purpose-built to accelerate customer performance to address modern market realities. Created through the merger of two industry leading companies – INC Research and inVentiv Health – we bring together approximately 24,000 clinical and commercial minds with the ability to support customers in more than 110 countries. Together we share insights, use the latest technologies and apply advanced business practices to speed our customers’ delivery of important therapies to patients. To learn more about how we are shortening the distance from lab to life® visit  syneoshealth.com or subscribe to our podcast.

Source Article

Continue reading

Intel, IIIT-Hyderabad, PHFI And Telangana Government Launch Applied Artificial Intelligence Research Center

What’s New: Today at the inaugural all.ai 2020 Virtual Summit, Intel India in collaboration with the government of Telangana, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) and Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) announced the launch of INAI, an applied artificial intelligence (AI) research center in Hyderabad. INAI is an initiative to apply AI to population scale problems in the Indian context, with a focus on identifying and solving challenges in the healthcare and smart mobility segments through strong ecosystem collaboration.

“With its unique strengths of talent, technology, data availability, and the potential for population-scale AI adoption, India has this tremendous opportunity to lead human-centric applications and democratize AI for the world. Our aspiration is to make AI synonymous with India as we strive to achieve the true potential of AI in critical segments like healthcare, smart mobility and the future of work by advancing innovation, research, technology and skills. The launch of the Applied AI Research Center, initiatives to train students on AI readiness skills and the all.ai 2020 Summit reinforce our commitment towards realizing the exponential impact of AI in an inclusive, collaborative and responsible manner.”
–Nivruti Rai, Intel country head for India and vice president of the Data Platforms Group

How It Will Work: INAI will act as a catalyst to accelerate India’s leadership in AI by driving innovation and entrepreneurship, creating national assets such as curated datasets, computing infrastructure, tools and frameworks with the aim to attract global talent for high-impact research towards social sector development. This collaborative effort, championed by Intel and catalyzed by the Government of Telangana, is anchored at IIIT-H and brings multiple institutions together to work on solutions that have societal-scale impact. PHFI is the founding healthcare partner in this initiative.

Why It Matters: As India continues its transformation, adoption of technology-led innovations becomes important to solve the country’s societal challenges in the critical areas of healthcare, smart mobility and the future of work. The need of the hour is for industry, government, academia and the public to work together to support development of technology with thoughtful consideration of its application in an ethical and inclusive manner. INAI will leverage the broader computing strengths and academic expertise of IIIT-H, the technology leadership and architecture strength of Intel, the public health expertise of PHFI, as well as expertise from other domain and technology players to drive targeted outcomes in technology innovation, entrepreneurship development, job creation and international collaboration.

“The launch of INAI, the Applied AI Research Center in Hyderabad, is a key milestone in our digitalization journey,” said Sri K. T. Rama Rao, Hon’ble Minister for IT, Industries, MA & UD, government of Telangana. “I strongly believe it is imperative for all ecosystem stakeholders to collectively work with a synchronous effort towards realizing our AI vision for enabling better governance and elevating quality of life for our people.”

In the smart mobility domain, INAI will advance research in the area of road safety with the aim of using AI to reduce road accidents

Continue reading

Important research delayed by COVID, says Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Davis

Fallout from COVID-19 hasn’t only stopped charities and other important causes from stagin their usual fundraising and public awarness event this year, it’s also having an impact on research.

“This year, because of COVID, everything has changed. Light the Night is the signature fundraising for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, which is the largest blood cancer serving organization in North America. So, it’s a large organization throughout North America, its important to the blood cancer community, and it also significantly supports blood cancer research, which would never happen on its own if it wasn’t for organizations such as the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada,” said survivor, former premier, and LLSC Board member Paul Davis, adding that about 60 percent of the boards revenue comes in between September and November.

He said that the virtual event a 90- minute live, national broadcast which will air in Newfoundland at 8:30 pm, will, like other years, be a time to hear the stories of survivors, honour heroes, remember loved ones who have been lost, and raise lanterns just like any other year.

“This national broadcast will bring all provinces, all Leukemia and Lymphoma Societies, together, and we’re all going to celebrate together, so that’s a first for that,” said Davis.

He said that much of the Society’s work is supporting and coordinating blood cancer research, which has unfortunately ground to half due to the pandemic.

“There have been more than 600 cancer research trials that have ben suspended or cancelled in Canada because of COVID, and researchers haven’t yet returned to their labs to being to fully resume work. So, that’s an impact that we’re concerned about,” said Davis, who himself knows firsthand the importance of ongoing research.

“I was diagnosed with blood cancer in 2011, and my doctor tells me now, that if I were to relapse today, my treatment today would be different than if I relapsed three years ago, because of research. So, research is very, very important. People quite often don’t fully understand the benefit of research, and how things change,” he said.

Those who do have a form of blood cancer may take extra precautions during the pandemic, as the cancer may compromise a person’s immune system.

“Blood cancer impacts people’s immune system, be it through leukemia or lymphoma, the two major types of blood cancer. They impact your immune system directly, weakening your immune system, making it more difficult from things such as colds or flus,” said Davis.

“If you have a compromised immune system, thigs such as colds or flus can be ore difficult to overcome, and the same could hold true for COVID.”

Last years event, held in Paradise Park, raised about $160,000.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

Source Article

Continue reading

Beyond Good Embarks Upon Second Phase of Research with Bristol Zoological Society To Study … | Money

In 2016, conservation scientists embarked on phase one of the research. They spent six months working with cocoa farmers, conducting lemur surveys and monitoring plantations using night cameras and acoustic units. The research identified five species of lemurs, including three categorized as Endangered on the IUCN Red List, living in the plantations. All 3,263 share trees in the plantations were also surveyed to understand which trees the lemurs were using.

In phase two, researchers will assess and increase connectivity between cocoa plantations and forest fragments to begin active development of habitat corridors and bolster biodiversity. Additionally, researchers will work with farmers to make agroforestry decisions that impact sustainable livelihoods and conservation.

In June 2020, a local field team on the ground in Madagascar began agroforestry and biodiversity framework to prepare for when Malagasy researchers from Bristol Zoological Society can travel to the research site. The research is expected to conclude in 2024.

The environmental stakes in Madagascar are high. Approximately 90% of plants and animal species found in Madagascar are endemic. However, because of Madagascar’s extreme rate of poverty, 90% of its original forest has been lost.

According to the World Cocoa Foundation, 70% of the world’s cocoa is grown in Africa; however, less than 1% of the world’s chocolate is produced there. Supply chain fragmentation drives poverty, exploitation, and environmental degradation in cocoa-producing countries. Most farmers earn less than $1USD a day. The traditional African cocoa supply chain involves three to five layers of intermediaries and requires up to 120 days in transit from farm to factory.

Source Article

Continue reading

Ethics, Society and Technology Hub embeds ethics in teaching and research

In recent decades, ideas originating with Stanford students and faculty brought technologies that have disrupted industries, revolutionized business and eased communication in our daily lives. But they have also been linked to societal problems such as widening inequality, racial bias and lack of privacy.

Political science professors Margaret Levi and Rob Reich will co-lead the Ethics, Society and Technology (EST) Hub. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)

As a way of ensuring that technological advances born at Stanford address the full range of ethical and societal implications, the Long-Range Vision launched the Ethics, Society and Technology (EST) Hub, co-led by Margaret Levi and Rob Reich, both professors of political science.

“Stanford is home to outstanding ethicists and social scientists but they haven’t been well integrated into the ways we teach about, or do research related to, technology,” said Debra Satz, the Vernon R. and Lysbeth Warren Anderson Dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences (H&S). “The EST Hub will bring their insights into the conversation with scientists and engineers about such matters as how we might consider the choices we make regarding technologies that have the potential for widespread societal consequences.”

The EST Hub will help coordinate and amplify the teaching, research and activities on campus at the intersection of ethics, society and technology.

“The wider world knows Stanford for its leading role in technology innovation and disruption,” said Reich, who is also director of the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society. “This initiative is born out of the desire that Stanford also be known for advances in our understanding of the ethical and social dimensions of technology.”

Like many initiatives formed through the Long-Range Vision, the EST Hub doesn’t create a new permanent entity. Instead, it is expected to have a three to five-year lifespan, with its activities eventually finding homes among Stanford’s existing institutes, centers and programs.

“It’s about culture change in those we touch and incorporating ethics into our practices. We want to jumpstart that activity and then make sure it lasts,” said Levi, who is also the Sara Miller McCune Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Ethics in the classroom

Reich helped launch a class called CS 182: Computers, Ethics and Public Policy, co-taught by Jeremy Weinstein, professor of political science, and Mehran Sahami, professor of computer science, which explores the intersection of technology, ethics and policy.

Move responsibly and think about things

In the course CS 181: Computers, Ethics and Public Policy, Stanford students become computer programmers, policymakers and philosophers to examine the ethical and social impacts of technological innovation.

“It’s the only class I know of where students have to complete technical assignments, policy papers and philosophy papers,” Reich said. He’s now exploring similar classes on topics like bioengineering and climate science. “We want to take this idea beyond computer science,” he said.

The EST Hub, in collaboration with Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) and the computer science department, has also begun working with a

Continue reading

Milo Phillips-Brown receives inaugural MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award | MIT News

Milo Phillips-Brown, a postdoc in the ethics of technology in MIT Philosophy, was recently named the inaugural recipient of the MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award, which provides support to promising PhD candidates or postdocs conducting interdisciplinary research on the societal and ethical dimensions of computing.

Phillips-Brown is being recognized for his work teaching responsible engineering practices to computer scientists. At MIT, he teaches two courses, 24.131 (Ethics of Technology) and 24.133 (Experiential Ethics), and has been an active participant in the activities of the Social and Ethical Responsibilities of Computing (SERC), a new cross-cutting area in the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing that aims to weave social, ethical, and policy considerations into the teaching, research, and implementation of computing.

“We are delighted to be able to work so closely with Milo,” says Julie Shah, an associate professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, who along with David Kaiser, the Germeshausen Professor of the History of Science and professor of physics, serves as associate dean of SERC. “Over this past spring semester, Milo was a great thought partner in the design of SERC-related materials, including original homework assignments and in-class demonstrations for instructors to embed into a wide variety of courses at MIT,” says Shah.

“We knew we had an exceptional colleague when we selected Milo as our inaugural postdoc. We look forward to collaborating with him and his continued contributions to SERC,” adds Kaiser.

In addition to active learning projects, Phillips-Brown has been working with Shah and Kaiser on preparing the first set of original case studies on social and ethical responsibilities of computing for release in the coming months. Commissioned and curated by SERC, each case study will be brief and appropriate for use in undergraduate instruction and will also be available to the public via MIT’s open access channels.

“I’m thrilled to be the inaugural recipient of the MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award. This is a time when we need to be exploring all possible avenues for how to teach MIT students to build technologies ethically, and the award is enabling me to help just do that: work with professors and students across the Institute to develop new models for ethical engineering pedagogy,” says Phillips-Brown.

Phillips-Brown PhD ’19 received his doctorate in philosophy from MIT and his bachelor’s in philosophy from Reed College. He is a research fellow in digital ethics and governance at the Jain Family Institute and a member of the Society for Philosophy and Disability. From 2015 to 2018, he directed the Philosophy in an Inclusive Key (PIKSI) Boston, a summer program for undergraduates from underrepresented groups. In January 2021, he will begin an appointment at Oxford University as an associate professor of philosophy in the Faculty of Philosophy and the Department of Computer Science.

The MAC3 Society and Ethics in Computing Research Award was established through the MAC3 Impact Philanthropies which provides targeted support to organizations and initiatives that impact early childhood, health and education,

Continue reading