Tag: Seeks

AG Daniel Cameron seeks to silence grand jurors

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A previous version of this video misstated the total length of recordings based on initial information provided by Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron.

USA TODAY

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron isn’t taking any chances.

His office Friday filed a motion to stay a potential judge’s order granting an anonymous grand juror’s right to speak out about the proceedings in the Breonna Taylor case.

Cameron’s motion says the failure to delay any order lifting the secrecy of the grand jury would immediately result in irreparable harm to the commonwealth because jurors could talk before Cameron’s office could file an appeal.

The grand juror “asks this court to invalidate centuries of practice, custom and tradition that make grand jury proceedings secret,” according to the motion filed by Assistant Attorney General Heather Becker. “But it’s not just practice, custom and tradition; it’s the law.”

Becker cited a 1924 case in which Kentucky’s Supreme Court said “it is the public policy of this commonwealth to keep secret the proceedings of the grand jury.”

Watch: Breonna Taylor’s mom says, ‘the system as a whole has failed her’

The grand juror said in a motion that he is seeking the right to freely discuss how Cameron’s office handled the Taylor case, including evidence, witnesses and charging options that might not have been presented to jurors.

His lawyer, Kevin Glogower, said at a hearing Thursday before Jefferson Circuit Judge Annie O’Connell that Cameron “opened the door” to talking about “all things grand jury” when he held a news conference Sept. 23 following the indictment.

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Glogower is representing one of the grand jurors in the Breonna Taylor case who wants the transcripts of the proceedings released.

Louisville Courier Journal

He told media the grand jury agreed that Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove were justified in returning deadly fire after having been fired upon by Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker.

The officers were serving a search warrant shortly before 1 a.m. March 13 to look for cash and drugs at Taylor’s home. They said they knocked and announced themselves, then used a battering ram to force open the door when no one responded.

Walker said neither he nor Taylor heard the police and he fired a warning shot when the door burst open, thinking someone was breaking in.

Photos: Decision in Breonna Taylor shooting sparks protests around the nation

More: The ‘very troubling’ questions Kentucky’s attorney general isn’t answering on the Breonna Taylor decision

Police say his shot hit Mattingly in the thigh, serving an artery. Mattingly, Cosgrove and Detective Brett Hankison fired 32 rounds in response, hitting the unarmed Taylor six times and killing her in her hallway. 

Cameron has since acknowledged that his office recommended an indictment only of Hankison, who was fired in June, for wanton endangerment for firing into an occupied apartment next to Taylor’s. Hankison has pleaded not guilty.

No one has been charged in Taylor’s death.

Glogower said jurors asked pointed questions during the proceeding

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Trump rape accuser seeks to bar U.S. government from her defamation lawsuit

By Jonathan Stempel

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes slandering women they sexually assaulted,” the lawyers wrote.

The Justice Department and a lawyer for Trump did not immediately respond on Tuesday to requests for comment. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan oversees the case.

Last month, the department said Trump acted “within the scope of his office as president” when speaking with the press about Carroll, and was shielded from her lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

But in Monday’s filing, Carroll’s lawyers Roberta Kaplan and Joshua Matz said that law generally covered lower-level government employees, often in federal agencies, but not the president.

The lawyers also noted that since taking office, Trump has sometimes claimed his business dealings and Twitter activity were “personal” matters. They said this made it incongruous for his comments about Carroll to be “presidential” in nature.

“Only in a world gone mad could it somehow be presidential, not personal, for Trump to slander a woman who he sexually assaulted,” they wrote.

Several women have accused Trump of sexual misconduct occurring before he took office. He has denied their claims.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by David Gregorio)

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Trump Rape Accuser Seeks to Bar U.S. Government From Her Defamation Lawsuit | Top News

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes slandering women they sexually assaulted,” the lawyers wrote.

The Justice Department and a lawyer for Trump did not immediately respond on Tuesday to requests for comment. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan oversees the case.

Last month, the department said Trump acted “within the scope of his office as president” when speaking with the press about Carroll, and was shielded from her lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

But in Monday’s filing, Carroll’s lawyers Roberta Kaplan and Joshua Matz said that law generally covered lower-level government employees, often in federal agencies, but not the president.

The lawyers also noted that since taking office, Trump has sometimes claimed his business dealings and Twitter activity were “personal” matters. They said this made it incongruous for his comments about Carroll to be “presidential” in nature.

“Only in a world gone mad could it somehow be presidential, not personal, for Trump to slander a woman who he sexually assaulted,” they wrote.

Several women have accused Trump of sexual misconduct occurring before he took office. He has denied their claims.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by David Gregorio)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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John McAfee Arrested in Spain, and U.S. Seeks Extradition

John David McAfee, an antivirus software pioneer who fled Belize in 2012 ahead of a murder investigation there, has been arrested in Spain on tax evasion charges, the U.S. Justice Department said on Monday.

Mr. McAfee, 75, is a Silicon Valley legend who earned millions from the computer virus-fighting software company that still bears his surname. In 2012, he disappeared from his home in Belize after the local police sought him for questioning over the death of his neighbor.

He resurfaced in Guatemala City a few weeks later, then largely dropped out of the public eye for years — until 2016, when he attempted to run as a Libertarian candidate for president of the United States.

The Justice Department said on Monday that Mr. McAfee’s extradition from Spain to the United States was “pending.” It did not provide a timeline, and Mr. McAfee could not immediately be reached for comment on Tuesday.

Prosecutors accused Mr. McAfee of failing to file tax returns from 2014 to 2018, even as he earned millions from “promoting cryptocurrencies, consulting work, speaking engagements, and selling the rights to his life story for a documentary,” according to a June indictment in the U.S. court in Tennessee that the Justice Department unsealed on Monday.

The indictment said that Mr. McAfee evaded his tax liability by accepting payments through bank accounts and cryptocurrency exchange accounts that were set up by others. It also said that he tried to dodge the Internal Revenue Service by dealing extensively in cryptocurrency and buying assets — including real estate and a yacht — in other peoples’ names.

Each count of tax evasion carries a maximum prison sentence of five years, and each tax evasion count carries a maximum one year sentence.

A separate complaint, filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday in the Southern District of New York against Mr. McAfee and his bodyguard, Jimmy Gale Watson, provided a few more details of the U.S. government’s allegations.

It said that Mr. McAfee had made more than $23 million from 2017 to 2018 by recommending several “initial coin offerings” — a type of crowdfunding — to his hundreds of millions of Twitter followers, playing it off as impartial investment advice without disclosing that he was being paid to do so.

According to the 55-page complaint, Mr. McAfee was paid about half in Bitcoin and half in “Ether,” the virtual currency of the Ethereum network, a virtual cousin of Bitcoin, by the companies that were selling the securities.

McAfee, the software company that bears his name, was once a household name in computer security software. Intel bought it in 2010 for $7.7 billion, but sold its majority stake six years later to the investment firm TPG. Mr. McAfee has not been associated with the company since the 1990s, and the recent indictment does not suggest that he has had any connection with it since.

In 2012, Mr. McAfee — who was born in Britain and raised in Virginia — was at the

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