Tag: shutdown

Cineworld’s zero-hours staff face no pay as it confirms UK shutdown

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Cineworld workers on zero-hours contracts in the UK could be left without pay beyond Thursday after the cinema chain confirmed it will temporarily close its 127 sites in Britain this week, putting 5,500 jobs at risk.



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The UK’s largest cinema operator declined to say how many of its staff are on zero-hour contracts – which do not guarantee any hours of work – but Cineworld workers contacted by the Guardian said that the majority of employees at the average Cineworld site are employed on zero-hour terms.

Cineworld employees first found out that their jobs were under threat via media reports on Saturday evening. On Monday afternoon employees had not received communication about their pay for the next month, according to workers who asked to remain anonymous because the terms of redundancy had not been settled.

Cineworld’s cinemas are generally run by a small team of salaried managers and a larger group of workers whose contracts give them no guaranteed hours of

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Trump signs stopgap spending bill to avert government shutdown

Washington — President Trump signed a stopgap government spending bill just after midnight Thursday that funds the government into December, averting a partial government shutdown.

The measure was passed with bipartisan support by the Senate on Wednesday and approved by the House last week. It was sent to the White House on Wednesday evening and signed by Mr. Trump after he returned to Washington, D.C., from a campaign swing through Minnesota, White House spokesman Judd Deere said.

The bill, known as a continuing resolution, keeps the government funded through December 11 and delays further congressional debate on routine government spending until after the presidential election. Negotiations over a new relief bill to address the coronavirus crisis are continuing.

While funding officially lapsed at midnight and Mr. Trump signed the bill after the deadline, federal operations were unaffected.

The spending bill is the result of a bipartisan deal between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. It includes an additional $8 billion for nutrition assistance programs and renews provisions of public health and transportation programs.

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Trump signs bill averting government shutdown

President Donald Trump signed Thursday a spending bill that averts a government shutdown and extends funding weeks beyond the November 3 presidential election, after Democrats reached a deal with the White House and Republicans.

The bipartisan text easily cleared the Senate Wednesday by 84 votes to 10 a week after it passed the House of Representatives.

It then went to Trump, who signed the so-called Continuing Resolution in the wee hours of Thursday, White House spokesman Judd Deere said.

Trump needed to sign the stop-gap measure by 11:59 pm Wednesday to avoid a partial government shutdown, as fiscal year 2021 technically begins on October 1.

He signed shortly after midnight, after returning from campaign stops, so technically there was in fact a mini-shutdown.

The short-term legislation keeps government federal agencies operating at current funding levels until December 11, easing pressure on Congress — and presidential candidates Trump and Democrat Joe Biden — to address the issue during a heated election.

The measure adds nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for children and families, and extends funding for community health centers to continue to address Covid-19 and health disparities.

Last week on the day the measure cleared the House, the United States surpassed the grim milestone of 200,000 coronavirus-related deaths.

Separate from the federal budget, lawmakers are in the middle of negotiating a much-needed, trillion-dollar-plus relief package for thousands of communities and millions of families suffering during the pandemic.  

Congress, which is deeply divided along party lines, would not likely have been able to reach a broader agreement on a new 2021 budget before the end of the fiscal year.

“I hope members of Congress can come back to the negotiating table in the coming weeks and work in a spirit of cooperation to pass a comprehensive funding bill,” Senate Republican Roger Wicker said.

“A continuing resolution is no substitute for a full appropriations package,” he added.

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Trump signs stopgap bill to avoid U.S. government shutdown

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting an event commemorating the repatriation of Native American remains and artifacts from Finland in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump signed a stopgap funding bill on Thursday that would keep the federal government open through December 11, the White House said in a statement.

Trump signed the measure into law shortly after government funding ran out at midnight.

The law would maintain current funding levels for most programs, avoiding a government shutdown in the middle of a pandemic just weeks ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election.

It would also give lawmakers more time to work out budget details for the fiscal year that ends on Sept. 30 2021, including for military operations, healthcare, national parks, space programs, and airport and border security.

On Tuesday, the Senate voted 82-6 on a procedural motion to advance the temporary funding bill.

The Democratic-led House of Representatives approved the measure a week ago after Democrats struck a deal with the White House and Republicans on farmers’ aid and nutritional assistance for children.

Reporting by Aishwarya Nair in Bengaluru; Editing by Shri Navaratnam and Peter Graff

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Trump signs temporary government funding bill, averting shutdown

President Trump has signed a bill to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a government shutdown when the new fiscal year starts Thursday.

Trump signed the bill, which was approved by sweeping bipartisan agreement Wednesday, into law early Thursday morning shortly after returning from campaigning in Minnesota.

The temporary extension will set the stage for a lame-duck session of Congress later this year, where the agenda will be largely determined by the outcome of the presidential election.

The measure would keep the government running through Dec. 11 and passed by a 84-10 vote. The House passed the bill last week.

The stopgap spending bill is required because the GOP-controlled Senate has not acted on any of the 12 annual spending bills that fund the 30% of the government’s budget that is passed by Congress each year. If Democratic nominee Joe Biden wins the White House in November, it’s likely that another stopgap measure would fund the government into next year and that the next administration and Congress would deal with the leftover business.

The measure is the bare minimum accomplishment for Capitol Hill’s powerful Appropriations committees, who pride themselves on their deal-making abilities despite gridlock in other corners of Congress.

The legislation — called a continuing resolution, or CR, in Washington-speak — would keep every federal agency running at current funding levels through Dec. 11, which will keep the government afloat past an election that could reshuffle Washington’s balance of power.

The measure also extends many programs whose funding or authorizations lapse on Sept. 30, including the federal flood insurance program, highway and transit programs, and a long set of extensions of various health programs, such as a provision to prevent Medicaid cuts to hospitals that serve many poor people.

It also finances the possible transition to a new administration if Biden wins the White House and would stave off an unwelcome COVID-caused increase in Medicare Part B premiums for outpatient doctor visits.

Farm interests won language that would permit Trump’s farm bailout to continue without fear of interruption. In exchange, House Democrats won $8 billion in food aid for the poor.

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Trump Signs Stopgap Funding Bill to Avert a Government Shutdown

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump signed stopgap spending legislation early Thursday to avert a government shutdown weeks before the presidential election, the White House said.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie


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Donald Trump

The spending authority of the U.S. had lapsed at midnight. The White House announced that he had signed the bill shortly after he returned from a campaign trip to Minnesota.

The bill will keep the government operating through Dec. 11 at current spending levels. The Senate on Wednesday approved the bill, which easily passed the House last week.

Congressional Democrats and Republicans, along with White House officials, last week removed the final stumbling block, by agreeing to provide aid to farmers and more food assistance for low-income families.

The bill provides as much as $30 billion for the Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corp., which the administration has used to send virus relief payments to farmers. Democrats got almost $8 billion for a pandemic program to feed children who normally receive school lunches.

With the temporary spending bill finished, lawmakers will try to complete work on the 12 annual appropriations bills for fiscal 2021 in the post-election lame-duck session in November and December. The Senate hasn’t drafted any of the bills so far, and there’s likely a battle ahead over paying for Trump’s wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and replacing military funds he redirected to pay for border security last year.

It was an impasse over the border wall that led to a 35-day government shutdown — the longest ever — beginning in December 2018.

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Senate passes stopgap funding measure to avoid government shutdown

The Senate passed a resolution with broad bipartisan support Wednesday to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a shutdown before the new fiscal year begins at midnight.



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Trump, who was holding a re-election rally in Minnesota, was expected to sign the measure when he returned to the White House. The stopgap measure passed by an 84-10 vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. The Democratic-controlled House passed the legislation, known as a continuing resolution, last week on a 359-57 vote.

The legislation includes a bailout for farmers — which Trump and Republicans fought to include — in exchange for boosts in funding for nutrition benefits for poor families requested by Democrats. It also continues to fund various parts of the federal government.

Farming and food benefits for poor families appeared to be the only coronavirus-related items included in the resolution as top Democrats, the White House and Republicans continue to haggle over continued Covid-19 relief for families.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., met Wednesday with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to again discuss the next round of coronavirus aid. The House plans to vote Thursday on an updated aid package that includes compromises Democrats have made, she said.

“We will be proceeding with our vote … on the updated Heroes Act in order to formalize our proffer to Republicans in the negotiations to address the health and economic catastrophe in our country,” she said in a statement.

Mnuchin said Wednesday on Fox Business that the updated $2.2 trillion, which was slimmed down from the $3.4 trillion bill the House passed in May, is something “we’re not going to do.”

“The good news is the speaker has come down from her $3.4 trillion deal. If there’s a fair compromise, we’re prepared to do it,” he said.

The interim spending bill also sets up a potential political fight toward the end of the year when it expires and lawmakers have to pass another temporary spending resolution or an annual spending bill just before a new Congress is sworn in, along with, potentially, a new administration.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., criticized the process last week, saying that the resolution is only temporary and that both chambers need to work on passing traditional spending bills.

“I’m hopeful that everyone will put their heads together to get the appropriation process done, and we’ll probably do it in an omnibus, not single appropriation bills, which is not a good way to do it, either,” he said.

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Senate passes stopgap government funding measure to avoid government shutdown

The Senate on Wednesday passed a resolution with broad bipartisan support to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a shutdown before the new fiscal year begins at midnight.



a man wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by NBC News


Trump, who is holding a re-election rally in Minnesota, is expected to sign the measure before the deadline. The stopgap measure passed by an 84-10 vote in the GOP-controlled Senate. The Democratic-controlled House passed the legislation, known as a continuing resolution or “CR,” last week with a 359-57 vote.

The legislation includes a bailout for farmers — which Trump and Republicans fought to have included — in exchange for boosts in funding to nutrition benefits to poor families requested by Democrats. It also continues to fund various parts of the federal government.

Farming and food benefits to poor families appeared to be the only coronavirus-related items included in the resolution as top Democrats, the White House and Republicans continue to haggle over continued Covid-19 relief to families.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., held a meeting with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on Wednesday to again discuss the next round of coronavirus aid. The House plans to vote on an updated aid package on Thursday that includes compromises Democrats have made, she said.

“We will be proceeding with our vote … on the updated Heroes Act in order to formalize our proffer to Republicans in the negotiations to address the health and economic catastrophe in our country,” she said in a statement.

Mnuchin said Wednesday on Fox Business that the updated $2.2 trillion, which was slimmed-down from the $3.4 trillion bill passed by the House in May, is something “we’re not going to do.”

“The good news is the speaker has come down from her $3.4 trillion deal. If there’s a fair compromise, we’re prepared to do it,” he said.

The interim spending bill also sets up a potential political fight toward the end of the year when it expires and lawmakers have to pass another temporary spending resolution or an annual spending bill just before a new Congress is sworn in and, potentially, a new administration.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., however, criticized the process last week, saying that the resolution is only temporary and both chambers need to work on passing traditional spending bills.

“I’m hopeful that everyone will put their heads together to get the appropriation process done and we’ll probably do it in an omnibus, not single appropriation bills, which is not a good way to do it either,” he said.

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US Senate passes stopgap to prevent government shutdown

The US Senate passed a budget bill Wednesday that avoids an imminent government shutdown and extends funding weeks beyond the November 3 presidential election, after Democrats reached a deal with the White House and Republicans.

The bipartisan text, which easily cleared the Senate 84 votes to 10 a week after it passed the House of Representatives, now goes to the White House.

President Donald Trump would need to sign the stop-gap measure by 11:59 pm Wednesday to avoid a partial government shutdown, as fiscal year 2021 technically begins on October 1.

The short-term legislation would keep government federal agencies operating at current funding levels until December 11, easing pressure on Congress — and presidential candidates Trump and Democrat Joe Biden — to address the issue during a heated election.

The measure adds nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for children and families, and extends funding for community health centers to continue to address Covid-19 and health disparities.

Last week on the day the measure cleared the House, the United States surpassed the grim milestone of 200,000 coronavirus-related deaths.

Separate from the federal budget, lawmakers are in the middle of negotiating a much-needed, trillion-dollar-plus relief package for thousands of communities and millions of families suffering during the pandemic.  

Congress, which is deeply divided along party lines, would not likely have been able to reach a broader agreement on a new 2021 budget before the end of the fiscal year.

“I hope members of Congress can come back to the negotiating table in the coming weeks and work in a spirit of cooperation to pass a comprehensive funding bill,” Senate Republican Roger Wicker said.

“A continuing resolution is no substitute for a full appropriations package,” he added.

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Senate Passes Stopgap Funding Bill to Avert Government Shutdown

(Bloomberg) — The Senate Wednesday passed a stopgap spending bill needed to prevent an Oct. 1 shutdown of the federal government on an 84 to 10 vote.



a large building: The U.S. Capitol building stands in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Senate returns today with the Trump administration and Democrats no closer to agreement on a new virus relief package than they were when talks broke off in early August, despite the pressure of the U.S. election in 56 days.


© Bloomberg
The U.S. Capitol building stands in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The Senate returns today with the Trump administration and Democrats no closer to agreement on a new virus relief package than they were when talks broke off in early August, despite the pressure of the U.S. election in 56 days.

The bill, H.R. 8337, which easily passed the House last week, now heads to President Donald Trump’s desk. He is expected to sign it before the midnight deadline.

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The funding bill would keep the government operating through Dec. 11 at current spending levels.

Congressional Republicans and Democrats, along with White House officials, last week removed the final stumbling block, striking a deal by agreeing to provide aid to farmers and more food assistance for low-income families.

The bill provides as much as $30 billion for the Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corp., which the Trump administration has used to send virus relief payments to farmers. Democrats got almost $8 billion for a pandemic program to feed children who normally receive school lunches.

With the temporary spending bill finished, lawmakers will try to complete work on the 12 annual appropriations bills for fiscal 2021 in the post-election lame-duck session in November and December. The Senate hasn’t drafted any of the bills so far, and there’s likely a battle ahead over paying for Trump’s wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and replacing military funds he redirected to pay for border security last year.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin agreed earlier this month to keep discussion of a coronavirus relief package separate from the stopgap bill. The two leaders on Wednesday held their first in-person talks since August, and while no deal on the stimulus was reached, they plan to continue discussions.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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