Tag: surge

Watch live: Dr. Anthony Fauci and Norah O’Donnell talk COVID-19 surge and government response

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, is speaking with “CBS Evening News” anchor and managing editor Norah O’Donnell in an interview that will be streamed live on Wednesday. They are expected to speak about the fall coronavirus surge and the government’s response in the interview, which will stream at 3:30 p.m. Eastern on CBSNews.com.

Viewers are invited to text Norah their questions at 202-217-1107.


How to watch Norah O’Donnell’s interview with Dr. Anthony Fauci

  • What: Norah O’Donnell interviews Dr. Anthony Fauci
  • Date: October 14, 2020 
  • Time: 3:30 p.m. ET
  • Location: via Zoom
  • Online stream: Live on CBSNews.com in the player above and on the CBS News app

Fauci, the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has publicly diverged from President Trump’s coronavirus messaging in recent days. 

After Mr. Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis and return to the White House earlier this month, the president described the treatment he was given as a “cure.” There are no known cures for COVID-19. Fauci told CBS News the term could lead to unnecessary “confusion.” “We don’t have any indication — I think you really have to depend on what you mean by a ‘cure,’ because that’s a word that leads to a lot of confusion,” Fauci said. “We have good treatments for people with advanced disease who are in the hospital.” 

Fauci has also taken issue with the president’s unauthorized use of his comments in a 30-second ad. Fauci said the decision to use his comments without consent, and out of context, is a form of harassment. “By doing this against my will they are, in effect, harassing me,” he told The Daily Beast in a report posted on Monday. 

Fauci has identified the White House ceremony for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett as a “super spreader” event. At least 24 people in Mr. Trump’s orbit, not all whom attended the event, have tested positive for COVID-19. 

“I think the — the data speaks for themselves,” Fauci said of mask-wearing. “We had a super-spreader event in the White House and it was in a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks. So the data speak for themselves.”

He warned that coronavirus cases are on the rise in a majority of states, with only three seeing fewer cases. “It’s going in the wrong direction right now,” Fauci said. “So if there’s anything we should be doing, we should be doubling down in implementing the public health measures that we’ve been talking about for so long. Which are: Keeping a distance, no crowds, wearing masks, washing hands, doing things outside as opposed to inside.”

Portions of Norah O’Donnell’s interview with Dr. Anthony Fauci will air on the “CBS Evening News” Wednesday evening at 6:30 p.m. ET on CBS and 10 p.m. on CBSN.

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Czech government closes bars, schools in what PM calls ‘one shot’ to curb COVID-19 surge

PRAGUE (Reuters) – The Czech government ordered bars, restaurants and clubs closed from Wednesday and shifted schools to distance learning as it puts new measures in place to curb the fast spread of novel coronavirus cases.

The Czech Republic is experiencing the strongest surge in Europe when adjusted for population as the number of infections detected since the outbreak began has soared to nearly 120,000, from around 25,000 at the beginning of September.



a clock tower in front of a building: The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Prague


© Reuters/DAVID W CERNY
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Prague


Hospitals are starting to feel that strain as the number of patients have doubled since the start of October to over 2,000.

The government has been seeking to avoid repeating the strict lockdowns imposed in the spring, which sent the economy into a record contraction. The summer saw a relaxation of restrictions after the country came through the first wave of the pandemic with far fewer cases than western neighbours.

“We are aware that we have one shot, and one shot that has to be successful so we manage the growth of the epidemic this time as well,” Prime Minister Andrej Babis said told a news conference.

Babis said the priority was for hospitals to be able to manage the sharp increase in infected patients.

From Wednesday, public gatherings would be limited to six people, alcohol consumption in public spaces would be banned and masks would be required at public transport stops. Takeaway orders will still be available until 8 p.m.

Schools, expect for pre-schools, would move to online lessons until Nov. 1 – a measure that companies and especially hospitals have worried would affect staffing. This extends distance learning that had already been in place for secondary schools.

The measures will be in place until the start of November, and the government said that while schools would definitely reopen on Nov. 2, other measures would be relaxed according to the epidemiological situation. The government had already tightened curbs to limit restaurant openings and widen the use of masks.

(Reporting by Jan Lopatka and Jason Hovet; Editing by Chris Reese and Grant McCool)

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Czech COVID-19 cases surge, government warns on hospital capacity

PRAGUE (Reuters) – New coronavirus infections in the Czech Republic reached a daily record of 4,457 on Tuesday, the health ministry said, as separate data showed the country now has the highest number of cases per 100,000 in Europe, surpassing Spain.

Data published by the health ministry on Wednesday showed the rise in new cases during the previous 24 hours had exceeded the previous one-day record of 3,794, to bring the total number of cases in the country since March to 90,022.

Separate data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control showed that in the two weeks to Monday, Oct. 6, the Czech Republic reported 326.8 cases per 100,000 people. That compared with 302.4 cases per 100,000 in Spain, which has been one of the countries worst hit by the pandemic.

The Czech government has already reimposed restrictions on businesses and public events after relaxing them during the summer, including banning outdoor gatherings of more than 20 people and shutting secondary schools from Monday.

More measures are expected to follow on Friday to prevent hospitals being overwhelmed by the spike in cases.

“If the government does not launch measures planned from next week, there is a real threat that by the end of October, healthcare capacity would be completely clogged,” Interior Minister Jan Hamacek said. “We cannot allow that to happen.”

Like other European governments, the Czechs are anxious to avoid a strict lockdown of the kind that closed shops, restaurants, schools and many factories in the spring, battering the economy in the second quarter.

While the government has said the health system could cope with several times more COVID-19 patients, adding pandemic capacity has already forced some hospitals to start reducing non-urgent care.

A spike in positive tests to an average 16% of all tests in the past week, more than three times the level seen as indicative the epidemic is under control, has worried health experts.

Some 1,387 people are currently hospitalised with COVID-19, six times higher than a month ago, including 326 in intensive care, an increase of more than five times.

Deaths have also accelerated, peaking at 29 per day on Oct. 4 — nearly 10% of average daily deaths seen in the country of 10.7 million before the pandemic. In total, 794 Czechs diagnosed with COVID-19 have died, including 145 in the week to Oct. 5.

For interactive graphics, please click on: https://tmsnrt.rs/2SxDhgD

(Reporting by Jason Hovet, Robert Muller, Jan Lopatka; Editing by Toby Chopra and Catherine Evans)

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Shares of Philippine Media Giant Shut by Government Surge 50% in Comeback

(Bloomberg) — Philippine media giant ABS-CBN Corp. rose by the 50% daily limit after announcing the return to free-to-air television of some of its entertainment shows three months since it was denied a congressional permit.

Shares closed at 13.50 pesos each on Wednesday in Manila trading, the highest since July 22, even as the index fell by 0.7%. It also rallied by 50% on Monday, then slumped 15% the next day. Shares of its parent company Lopez Holdings Corp. also rose by 21% on Wednesday.



a group of people standing in front of a store: Operations At The ABS-CBN Broadcasting Center as Media Giant Asks Top Court to Halt Closure


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Operations At The ABS-CBN Broadcasting Center as Media Giant Asks Top Court to Halt Closure

Technical staff work on videos and other reports inside the newsroom of the ABS-CBN Corp. Broadcasting Centre in Metro Manila, the Philippines, on May 12.

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Photographer: Veejay Villafranca/Bloomberg

Philippine Media Giant Criticized by Duterte Returns to Free TV

ABS-CBN has stopped broadcast since May when the government ordered it to shut its free TV and radio stations after its franchise expired. The network — often the target of President Rodrigo Duterte’s tirades — said Tuesday that some of its shows and movies will be seen on Channel 11 through an agreement with Zoe Broadcasting Network Inc.

It will, however, take some time, for the media network’s earnings and share price to rebound to pre-shutdown levels, said Nicky Franco, head of research at Abacus Securities Corp. “The block time deal will probably give the company just a fraction of its old airtime, geographic reach and margins,” he said.

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©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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Oil Rises After Biggest Surge Since May on Stimulus Optimism

(Bloomberg) — Oil rose further after the biggest gain since May on growing optimism for more U.S. fiscal stimulus and as Hurricane Delta heads for the Gulf of Mexico.

Futures added 3% in New York, following Monday’s surge above $39 a barrel. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will resume talks on Tuesday on another round of pandemic relief funding, but there’s no sign yet they are close to a deal despite Trump’s urging to get it done.

At the same time Hurricane Delta is hurtling toward the Gulf of Mexico, where it will likely force oil production to shut down. Gasoline futures gained Monday as the storm’s track became clearer, and continued to outpace gains in crude Tuesday.



chart: Oil reverses last week's losses when it plunged to a three-week low


© Bloomberg
Oil reverses last week’s losses when it plunged to a three-week low

Crude started the week by getting swept up in a broader market relief rally, and was aided by a strike in Norway that has shut fields and is curbing flows. Masses of people in China are vacationing during the Golden Week holiday, displaying the country’s confidence in its economic rebound and public health measures. But the outlook for global oil demand remains patchy with stricter lockdowns coming into force in parts of Europe.

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“This week is shrouded in upside risks, placing demand concerns to the background,” said Kevin Solomon, analyst at brokerage StoneX Group in London. “The promise of fiscal stimulus will continue to be a supporting factor.”

Prices
West Texas Intermediate for November delivery rose $1.18 to $40.40 a barrel as of 9:07 a.m. New York timeBrent for December settlement gained $1.1, or 2.7%, to $42.41 on the ICE Futures Europe exchange

Moves in the oil futures curve were more circumspect on Monday, signaling underlying weakness. The nearest timespread for Brent, which helps gauge the health of the market, gained only 1 cent and later contracts remain more expensive than nearer ones, showing oversupply. There have also been a flurry of options trades that would profit a buyer from lower prices in recent days.

See also: The World’s Biggest Oil Trader Wants to Buy Your Used Car

With a storm heading toward the U.S. Gulf attention is once again focusing on American oil balances. The American Petroleum Institute will release its weekly oil inventory update later, while the Energy Information Administration’s monthly report will also be released, giving clues about U.S. production.

Other oil-market news:
U.S. oil pipeline operators are slashing fees to encourage customers in Texas to keep using their networks to ship barrels to the Gulf Coast as the pandemic wreaks havoc on profits.JPMorgan Chase & Co. agreed to take over a bankrupt shale explorer that failed to lure other bidders.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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Coronavirus latest: UK cases surge as government says technical fault affects testing data

Jasmine Cameron-Chileshe in London

The number of positive coronavirus cases within the UK surged again on Sunday, with the government admitting that “technical” issues had caused delays in the publication of test results.

A record 22,961 new coronavirus cases were confirmed on Sunday, an increase of more than 10,000 compared with 12,872 on Saturday.

The government said a technical issue had been identified overnight on Friday “in the automated process that transfers positive cases data” to Public Health England.

As a result, the number of coronavirus cases announced on Saturday and Sunday included 15,841 additional cases from between September 25 and Friday. Last night, the government said that the issue, though resolved, would affect case numbers in the next few days.

A message on the coronavirus data dashboard on Saturday warned that data published in the next few days would “include some additional cases” from between September 24 and October 1.

In an interview with BBC’s The Andrew Marr Show on Sunday, UK prime minister Boris Johnson argued that government testing data was still “reliable” and called the recent problems a “computing error.”

He said: “All the people who had a positive test have now been notified and I think the data that we have is realistic, and again it’s very useful in helping us to identify you know where the incidence is and what we need to do to tackle it.”

Boris Johnson, left, is interviewed by the BBC’s Andrew Marr on Sunday

Mr Johnson defended his testing system, arguing that while it was not “perfect” and he remained “frustrated” with it, testing had “made a huge difference” to the government’s ability to track the virus’ growth.

“I think by international comparators it is really very, very good indeed and yes it could be a lot better, but we’re going to get a lot better. And by the way they’re going to get up to 500,000 tests a day by the end of this month,” he added.

The latest figures follow growing criticism from Labour who have accused the government of “serial incompetence” and have called for greater “clarity”.

Speaking to Andrew Marr ahead of Mr Johnson’s interview, shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth argued that the testing system was “simply not working” and said the lockdown rules appeared to “chop and change all over the place.”

He said: “We support local restrictions, but what people want is clarity… So we need clarity on why an area goes into restrictions, clarity on how an area gets out of restrictions.”

Mr Ashworth said local authorities should have control over the testing system and the tracing system. “The Serco call centre is simply not working. In Bradford, in Oldham it’s around 50 per cent of contacts are getting traced. No wonder they’re failing to get on top of the infection.”

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